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I designed a pair of wooden lasercut headphones!

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 
Hi all,
I'm an industrial design student at metro state in Denver,co. Last semester I designed a pair of wooden headphones that were cut on a laser. This was for a project where we were just learning a program called autocad. It was my absolute favorite project that I've done since I transferred here last January, and I just mustered up some courage to take a shot at showing the project to all of the audiophiles here biggrin.gif. You can see them here in my profile picture, and I would post more pictures but I guess since I just made an account I don't have access to that just yet. If you want a couple more pictures http://www.coroflot.com/EtonM/portfolio heres my tiny tiny portfolio. So yeah! Tell me what ya think smily_headphones1.gif

I used a pair of 50 mm audio technica drivers that I ordered from them for about 20 bucks. The wood I used is 1/4" birch plywood. The speaker wire was stolen from a shoddy pair of headphones I had lying around. At the moment they're just a prototype, so the sound quality is nowhere near what I want it to be, so any suggestions you guys have to improve the design would be great. I think the main flaws in the design are the boxy cup shape, the thin wire and the lack of power being put through the drivers. Thanks!
post #2 of 8

The aesthetic of the design is great, as is the way you have cut the wood to allow the headband to flex.

 

Looking at your other pictures, it seems the cups are closed back. The audio performance is related to whether the cups are open or closed back, and audio technica make both types. You will need to look into this in order to tune the audio performance, which is also affected by the dimensions and the shape of the cavities. The simplest thing, obviously, is to mimic the design these drivers are intended for.

 

Many people will feel that solid wood is preferable to ply.

 

Some CNC cut cups for electrostatics I'm working on:-

 

 

 

Some other interesting threads:-

 

http://www.head-fi.org/t/673999/designing-and-3d-printing-dt770-headband-yoke-replacement

 

http://www.head-fi.org/t/679185/the-3d-printer-thread-d

 

w

post #3 of 8

That adjustable headband is ingenious, but the padding underneath it could've been done better (imo). I actually like the boxy cup shape but as said above, an open back design might be better soundwise.

post #4 of 8

That is a neat design, so how do they sound?

post #5 of 8
Wow! I really like the way you make your headband. For an ultimate DIY headphones, you'll want to try to make a pair of electrostatic headphones. smily_headphones1.gif

http://www.head-fi.org/t/498292/my-diy-electrostatic-headphones
post #6 of 8
Thread Starter 

Thanks to everyone for the compliments on the aesthetics! I'm currently working on a better way for these to be more rigid and adjustable. It has been pretty difficult to get a good ergonomic band shape, because the wood likes to bend back to being straight. I'm thinking that I'm going to make 2 small dados on the top side of the headband and inlay some kind of brushed aluminum or stainless steal rod and change the adjustability interface so it's a little bit more customizable. The way it's designed right now forces your to choose between only a couple sizes instead of allowing you to get just the right fit. 

 

Another part of the design I'd like to tweak is that I want to design some sort of planar magnetic or electrostatic driver that doesn't have to be plugged into an amp to be enjoyed. Any suggestions on how to go about this?

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by wakibaki View Post
 

The aesthetic of the design is great, as is the way you have cut the wood to allow the headband to flex.

 

Looking at your other pictures, it seems the cups are closed back. The audio performance is related to whether the cups are open or closed back, and audio technica make both types. You will need to look into this in order to tune the audio performance, which is also affected by the dimensions and the shape of the cavities. The simplest thing, obviously, is to mimic the design these drivers are intended for.

 

Many people will feel that solid wood is preferable to ply.

 

Some other interesting threads:-

 

http://www.head-fi.org/t/673999/designing-and-3d-printing-dt770-headband-yoke-replacement

 

http://www.head-fi.org/t/679185/the-3d-printer-thread-d

 

@Wakibaki- Audio Technica gave me drivers that are actually from a pair of discontinued headphones, so I honestly have no idea whether they're meant to be closed or open backed cups. Are there any distinguishing differences between the two types of driver?

 
 
 

Quote:

Originally Posted by bootdsc View Post
 

That is a neat design, so how do they sound?

At the moment, they sound pretty terrible in all honesty. They're golden in the high frequency ranges for the most part, but as I turn the volume up the bass quickly deteriorates and I'm left with almost screechy hi frequency sound. Does anybody have a good solution for this?

 

 

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by chinsettawong View Post

Wow! I really like the way you make your headband. For an ultimate DIY headphones, you'll want to try to make a pair of electrostatic headphones. smily_headphones1.gif

http://www.head-fi.org/t/498292/my-diy-electrostatic-headphones

Thanks :D. I love the way you've done the cups on your pair. What are some of the most difficult challenges you had to get through when making your pair? I really want to do my own driver, and I'm trying to decide between the different types of drivers.

post #7 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eton View Post

 

Thanks :D. I love the way you've done the cups on your pair. What are some of the most difficult challenges you had to get through when making your pair? I really want to do my own driver, and I'm trying to decide between the different types of drivers.

 

To be honest, the most difficult part for me to make right now is the headband.  It would be a big challenge for me to make a good looking one like yours.  :)

post #8 of 8
You can run electrostatics from a regular (speaker) amp with the aid of a transformer. I bought a 15w amp and PSU on ebay that I was going to dedicate to the purpose. I think I can get enough voltage swing from it, but this is undetermined as of yet. You need an HT bias supply too, but these are simple to make and can run off the same 12V DC. Google 'rod elliott electrostatic ht supply'. The advantage of the electrostatics is that making the drivers is quite do-able if you have access to a CNC mill. You might be able to make them with a laser cutter with a bit of ingenuity.

As for the planar magnetics, I haven't dug into that myself just yet.

w
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