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High Fidelity Fuses

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

All I have to say is...really!! Are you kidding me!

post #2 of 12

Really, they are for real. They lie somewhere near the top of the hi-fi gullibility pyramid: just a tad below the teleportation tweak but above the magic pebbles. (Go for the cryogenic ones.) Really!!

post #3 of 12

I believe it is said and measured that there is some slight nonlinear characteristic across them. So yes, this has an impact on the input or performance of the power supply of something, which in turn has its own marginal effect all the way down the chain.

 

I don't know if you'd be able to measure anything different at the output of any device as the result of a change in fuse (most probably not), much less hear the difference.

post #4 of 12

Unless the power supply section consisted of a rectifier and zero filtering, it isn't plausible that the fuse can have an effect on anything. The math just doesn't work out...

 

Cheers

post #5 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by ab initio View Post
 

Unless the power supply section consisted of a rectifier and zero filtering, it isn't plausible that the fuse can have an effect on anything. The math just doesn't work out...

 

Cheers


Depends on which math you are referring to. 

 

Cost of gold plated or other exotic fuse, not likely to exceed a couple bucks. 

Retail can be dozens of times that much if you market it correctly. 

Much profit can accrue. 

post #6 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by esldude View Post
 


Depends on which math you are referring to. 

 

Cost of gold plated or other exotic fuse, not likely to exceed a couple bucks. 

Retail can be dozens of times that much if you market it correctly. 

Much profit can accrue. 


Oh! I stand corrected!

 

Step 1: Apply micron-thick layer of gold

Step 2: ???

Step 3: Profit!!!

 

Yup, totally legit.

 

Cheers!

post #7 of 12

Yeah, I don't even know what kind of test circuit you would build to highlight any possible difference, unless you're building something to effectively magnify the distortion, like they do for testing top-performing gear. I mean, even if you stick it on the output, you're probably not going to hear it.

post #8 of 12

Those extra ~40 mOhms is a real performance killer!

post #9 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by mikeaj View Post
 

I believe it is said and measured that there is some slight nonlinear characteristic across them.

 

Which is of course not much of an issue considering that the fuse is followed by a rectifier that (by design) has more than just slight non-linearity. The unwanted effects of the highly non-linear rectified sine wave are then filtered out by capacitors, regulation (optional, but cheap for low power devices including headphone amplifiers), and the PSRR of the audio circuits.

post #10 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by stv014 View Post

Which is of course not much of an issue considering that the fuse is followed by a rectifier that (by design) has more than just slight non-linearity. The unwanted effects of the highly non-linear rectified sine wave are then filtered out by capacitors, regulation (optional, but cheap for low power devices including headphone amplifiers), and the PSRR of the audio circuits.

Yeah. It's like worrying about what's going on below the thermal noise of a length of wire.

se
post #11 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by ab initio View Post
 

Those extra ~40 mOhms is a real performance killer!

 

For those people who believe fuses make a difference to sound, I sell The Final Solution(tm): A slug of solid copper, the same size and shape as a standard fuse.

post #12 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Don Hills View Post
 

 

For those people who believe fuses make a difference to sound, I sell The Final Solution(tm): A slug of solid copper, the same size and shape as a standard fuse.


Kinda defeats of the whole "fuse" aspect of the device however it does work from an audiophile perspective.

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