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Best Studio Headphones - Page 16

post #226 of 311

I've heard a lot of great things about the Alpha Dogs and my short term impressions were that they are neutral and detailed in the highs while sounding very natural. Also they sound open which is unheard of for most closed cans. The mids sound fantastic and I need more time evaluating them again but they are unmatched IMO for $600. A pretty penny for some headphones but 6Moons audio talked about how they even outmatched the Audeze LCD2.2 in some areas.

 

EDIT: And they isolate :]

post #227 of 311
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kierkes View Post
 

your own exaggerated perception of your voice's bass frequencies. 

 

What do you mean?

post #228 of 311
Thread Starter 

Possible weaknesses of good headphones:

 

post #229 of 311
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sinocelt View Post
 

Possible weaknesses of good headphones:

 

 

Looks like it got rained on too. :tongue_smile: 

post #230 of 311
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sinocelt View Post
 

 

What do you mean?

 

You know how people are surprised when they hear recordings of themselves the first time. It always sounds thinner in third-person. Recording vocals with bassy headphones is something I and most people I know have difficulty with, because the sound "bottoms out" when the signal starts stacking with your hearing your own voice directly. I don't know any headphones that I'd consider good for monitoring AND critical listening.

post #231 of 311
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kierkes View Post
 

You know how people are surprised when they hear recordings of themselves the first time. It always sounds thinner in third-person.

 

Because your own voice resonates through your own body when you speak, and the lower a frequency the more it resonates. OK, I see your point. (Actually, I saw it before, but I wasn't sure I did. Thanks for clarifying.)

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kierkes View Post
 

Recording vocals with bassy headphones is something I and most people I know have difficulty with, because the sound "bottoms out" when the signal starts stacking with your hearing your own voice directly. I don't know any headphones that I'd consider good for monitoring AND critical listening.

 

But that makes it impossible to recommend a pair of monitoring headphones for vocalists in general. For instance, as a low baritone, I produce lower frequencies than a tenor, so I would need headphones with less bass than a tenor to compensate for the additional body resonance.

 

At that point, I guess using hardware equalization would be the only solution. But for that purpose, headphones able to produce at least neutral bass would be better (as equalizing down is cleaner than equalizing up).

post #232 of 311
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sinocelt View Post
 

But that makes it impossible to recommend a pair of monitoring headphones for vocalists in general. For instance, as a low baritone, I produce lower frequencies than a tenor, so I would need headphones with less bass than a tenor to compensate for the additional body resonance.

 

It's always hard to recommend headphones in general. :P You definitely have a great point though!

 

Obviously, there are other factors, like isolation; it's why a lot of singers like to monitor in mono through one ear and leave the other to hear themselves. Besides, perceived pitch of the voice is the sympathies between higher harmonics, especially in males. It's why I pay more attention to timbre than range; I know lots of basses with crispy and sizzly voices that can actually use a bass bump when EQing. What I've found is that the "silk" of the male voice can be brought up while mixing somewhere between 150 and 250 Hz, and a lot of headphones, especially closed pairs, have a lot of trouble with that region. I prefer to err on the side of "thin" just to be safe from that bassy drone that happens when midbass frequencies stack like crazy.

 

And sometimes the microphone you're using is dead wrong for the singer, haha! The big bad wolf huffing and puffing into a Shure SM7b will probably sound incomprehensible to himself regardless of his headphones! :P

post #233 of 311
Quote:
Originally Posted by Claritas View Post
 

 

Looks like it got rained on too. :tongue_smile: 

 

That raindrop paint job is surprisingly nice in person ;) Mine developed a crack as well. (See: http://www.head-fi.org/t/702029/focal-spirit-professional-appreciation-society/345#post_10405414)

 

It didn't seem to be structurally damaging in the short-term and I certainly wouldn't discount them over it. I actually predicted that this was going to happen in my FSP review. The headband is really poorly designed.

 

Re: the list in the first post, I'd definitely move LFF's Paradox up into the first tier category of Best All Purpose Closed Studio headphones. I should have a Head Fi review done in the (hopefully) next two weeks. Just incredible headphones - simply stunning - and really my new benchmark for a neutral listening response. 

post #234 of 311
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by AustinValentine View Post
 

It didn't seem to be structurally damaging in the short-term and I certainly wouldn't discount them over it. I actually predicted that this was going to happen in my FSP review. The headband is really poorly designed.

 

... and the earcups are too small. Great. Did they even test that thing for more than a few minutes? :( I mean, sure, all reports point to great sound, but if it isn't comfortable for long sessions and breaks within a few weeks ... :triportsad:

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by AustinValentine View Post
 

Re: the list in the first post, I'd definitely move LFF's Paradox up into the first tier category of Best All Purpose Closed Studio headphones. I should have a Head Fi review done in the (hopefully) next two weeks. Just incredible headphones - simply stunning - and really my new benchmark for a neutral listening response. 

 

There's no tier in the first post. There are three categories: best headphones marketed as studio monitors; best headphones not marketed as studio monitors but worth considering for that purpose; and open cans.

 

Are you going to compare the Paradox to the Alpha Dog and the ZMF x VIBRO? :biggrin:

post #235 of 311
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sinocelt View Post

 

There's no tier in the first post. There are three categories: best headphones marketed as studio monitors; best headphones not marketed as studio monitors but worth considering for that purpose; and open cans.

 

 

The following is not meant as an attack, but just because I’m nit picky: That isn’t how you’ve structured the first post at all.  “Possible Contenders” is in no way coterminous with “best headphones not marketed as studio monitors.” “Possible contenders” is term that implies both questionable valuation and contingency.  i.e. That the first set are trusted or known elements because they were marketed as such, and that the second set should be met with some skepticism and hesitation.

 

Even though it might be unintended, I think a tiered system is the result of the way that the first post is currently structured.  I think that the use of “marketed as” as a taxonomic system: first, privileges headphones that have heavy marketing departments and are large established houses, with multiple headphone lines that require marketing for differentiation; next, implies that said marketing is actually trustworthy. I think both of these are pretty problematic.  

 

Because I want to be helpful, and honestly believe that this thread is/can continue to be a helpful one: Far be it for me to be in any way critical without providing some sort of alternative. I actually think that simply having categories by form factor is probably the better bet if you want to avoid that kind of privilege I mentioned above. (Coincidentally, this is also what Tyll does on the Wall of Fame and I think he does so for many good reasons.) Category Recommendations: Closed Studio, Closed Portable, Open, and IEM. Adding an IEM category allows for tools like the UERM and various other CIEM’s that are currently employed in a professional environment. This category could also be folded into the Closed Portable category. Another way of doing it would be by separating headphones based on types of audio work, but I believe that would get way way too convoluted.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sinocelt View Post

 

Are you going to compare the Paradox to the Alpha Dog and the ZMF x VIBRO? :biggrin:

 

 

Re: Am I going to make a multiple T50RP comparison? No, but those comparos are all over the web currently, with multiple on Head-Fi itself.  (Even ones that include Smeggy’s Thunderpants!) The Paradox provides an important litmus test for thinking through the logic of the use of “marketed as” in first post though: Luis Flores (LFF) designed the Paradox for personal use as a work headphone in his own job as a mastering and sound restoration engineer. It was never marketed as a mastering and recording headphone because – as far as I can tell – it was never actually marketed at all. 

post #236 of 311
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by AustinValentine View Post
 

The following is not meant as an attack, but just because I’m nit picky: That isn’t how you’ve structured the first post at all.  “Possible Contenders” is in no way coterminous with “best headphones not marketed as studio monitors.” “Possible contenders” is term that implies both questionable valuation and contingency.  i.e. That the first set are trusted or known elements because they were marketed as such, and that the second set should be met with some skepticism and hesitation.

 

I replaced "possible contenders" by "possible top contenders."

 

The "top contenders" are headphones that are marketed toward studio use; most of them are commonly used in studios, which makes them a known quantity. The "possible top contenders" are headphones that are not marketed toward studio use, not commonly used in studios, yet worth considering for that purpose.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by AustinValentine View Post
 

Even though it might be unintended, I think a tiered system is the result of the way that the first post is currently structured.  I think that the use of “marketed as” as a taxonomic system: first, privileges headphones that have heavy marketing departments and are large established houses, with multiple headphone lines that require marketing for differentiation; next, implies that said marketing is actually trustworthy. I think both of these are pretty problematic.  

 

Not quite. If Luis Flores, for instance, writes on his page that the Paradox are suitable for mixing/mastering, then I'll move them to the other list. I'm not asking for a company to spend millions on a specific campaign or to have dozens of different headphones with very specific niches.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by AustinValentine View Post
 

Because I want to be helpful, and honestly believe that this thread is/can continue to be a helpful one: Far be it for me to be in any way critical without providing some sort of alternative. I actually think that simply having categories by form factor is probably the better bet if you want to avoid that kind of privilege I mentioned above. (Coincidentally, this is also what Tyll does on the Wall of Fame and I think he does so for many good reasons.) Category Recommendations: Closed Studio, Closed Portable, Open, and IEM. Adding an IEM category allows for tools like the UERM and various other CIEM’s that are currently employed in a professional environment.

 

This thread was started in the "Headphones (Full Size)" forum, so IEMs weren't included. It was moved to the current forum without my knowledge, I don't even know when.

 

CIEMs are tricky. More people have the opportunity to compare headphones than IEMs, and a lot more have the opportunity to compare either than CIEMs. Moreover, if you record someone else and want them to hear what you hear, you can lend them your headphones (or have more than one pair); not so with CIEMs. It doesn't mean the UE IERM, the Noble 4S, and the CA Pro 210, to name just a few, aren't top contender in their own right; indeed, if you only record yourself, they may very well be the best possible choice.

 

Universal IEMs are numerous and, except for the Etys, none of them are marketed toward studio use. This would make drawing a proper list very difficult and time-consuming.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by AustinValentine View Post
 

Re: Am I going to make a multiple T50RP comparison? No, but those comparos are all over the web currently, with multiple on Head-Fi itself.  (Even ones that include Smeggy’s Thunderpants!) 

 

I have seen the Mad Dog being compared to other mods, and the Alpha Dog to the Thunderpants, but not the Alpha Dog to the Paradox or the ZMF.

post #237 of 311
Thread Starter 
post #238 of 311
Thread Starter 
post #239 of 311
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sinocelt View Post
 

A review of the HD 6 Mix.

lol I love reviews from people that know nothing about audio. Sure, I bet you can hear the 8Hz really well...

It says something that they gave the 280pro such a high rating too.

post #240 of 311
Quote:
Originally Posted by kraken2109 View Post

lol I love reviews from people that know nothing about audio. Sure, I bet you can hear the 8Hz really well...

LOL
Great observation. I'm sure that he tested the <20hz response as well wink.gif

I wouldn't put a lot of stock some of the specific statements in that review, either, other than that the reviewer liked it and liked the bass.
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