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Chord Hugo - Page 556

post #8326 of 8333

I really like your poignant comment that "In the internet age all customers are local customers" as this is very true and should be acknowledged by all online retailers selling worldwide. 

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by Pepsican View Post
 

 

I wouldn't :-) He bought from Custom Cable and they already replied that they would help him. Custom Cable take their business very seriously and seem to understand that in the internet age all customers are local customers.

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post #8327 of 8333
Quote:
Originally Posted by x838nwy View Post
 

When you say "large", how large are we talking about? I've certainly received a few of those reserve battery for mobile phones via air DHL no problem.

 

 

The situation is like this:

 

Batteries that are classed as dangerous goods by the latest edition of the International Civil Aviation Organization’s (ICAO) Technical Instructions are prohibited. This includes lithium ion/polymer/metal/alloy batteries sent in isolation or with equipment.

 

Lithium ion/polymer/metal/alloy batteries when sent contained in equipment such as a mobile phone or digital camera are allowed.

 

Each package must contain no more than four cells or two batteries installed in equipment. The maximum net quantity of cells or batteries is 5kg per package. Watt-hour rating must not exceed 20Wh per cell or 100Wh per battery. Each cell and battery must be of a type proven to meet the requirements of each test in the UN Manual of Tests and Criteria, Part III, section 38.3. Batteries are subject to these tests irrespective of whether the cells of which they are composed have been so tested.

 

Cells and batteries must be manufactured under a quality management programme as specified in the International Civil Aviation Organization’s Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods by Air. Cells or batteries that are defective for safety reasons, or that have been damaged, are forbidden. Any person preparing or offering cells or batteries with or in equipment for transport must receive adequate instruction on the requirements commensurate with their responsibilities. Cells and batteries must be protected against short circuit.

 

The equipment containing cells or batteries must be packed in strong rigid packaging and must be secured against movement within the outer packaging and packed to prevent accidental activation. The sender’s name and return address must be clearly visible on the outer packaging.

 

 

............ they don't make it easy ...

 

   

Edited by joeexp - Today at 1:22 am
post #8328 of 8333
Quote:
Originally Posted by joeexp View Post
 

 

 

The situation is like this:

 

Batteries that are classed as dangerous goods by the latest edition of the International Civil Aviation Organization’s (ICAO) Technical Instructions are prohibited. This includes lithium ion/polymer/metal/alloy batteries sent in isolation or with equipment.

 

Lithium ion/polymer/metal/alloy batteries when sent contained in equipment such as a mobile phone or digital camera are allowed.

 

Each package must contain no more than four cells or two batteries installed in equipment. The maximum net quantity of cells or batteries is 5kg per package. Watt-hour rating must not exceed 20Wh per cell or 100Wh per battery. Each cell and battery must be of a type proven to meet the requirements of each test in the UN Manual of Tests and Criteria, Part III, section 38.3. Batteries are subject to these tests irrespective of whether the cells of which they are composed have been so tested.

 

Cells and batteries must be manufactured under a quality management programme as specified in the International Civil Aviation Organization’s Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods by Air. Cells or batteries that are defective for safety reasons, or that have been damaged, are forbidden. Any person preparing or offering cells or batteries with or in equipment for transport must receive adequate instruction on the requirements commensurate with their responsibilities. Cells and batteries must be protected against short circuit.

 

The equipment containing cells or batteries must be packed in strong rigid packaging and must be secured against movement within the outer packaging and packed to prevent accidental activation. The sender’s name and return address must be clearly visible on the outer packaging.

 

 

............ they don't make it easy ...

 

   

 

Thanks, dude. I've actually backed a battery campaign on IGG recently… I best get in touch with them quick...

post #8329 of 8333

I'm not one for cross-thread postings, but given that some here seem to get a kick out of seeing the Hugo with different gear I think a reflection on why Chord went with a brushed aluminum look may be in order  ;)

 

http://www.head-fi.org/t/667711/new-schiit-ragnarok-and-yggdrasil/2940#post_10903636

 

I guess if you cant beat the herd you may as well join it - a gunmetal-grey Hugo with simulated bullet holes would be awesome. 

 

post #8330 of 8333

 Yes Please :D

post #8331 of 8333
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilW View Post
 

 Yes Please :D


Any other mods other than the colour?

post #8332 of 8333

No other mods to the Black Edition no!

post #8333 of 8333
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pepsican View Post
 

 

I wouldn't :-) He bought from Custom Cable and they already replied that they would help him. Custom Cable take their business very seriously and seem to understand that in the internet age all customers are local customers.

 

the advise I gave is valid as the Hugo will have to be returned to the UK no matter to whom, it was also the advice I was instructed to give to another Head-Fi'er who had a similar problem a few months back by Chord(a different UK dealer)... Phil has a good reputation on these boards and no doubt things will be sorted with a positive outcome.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lockeray View Post
 



Thanks Paul for the information =) I have just checked with fedex and I asked them what i should take note of for shipping of defective electronic products to UK.

The fedex guy mentioned that I needed an import license or custom license of some sort even if I'm shipping it for repair and he mentioned that it applies to all electronic items that are being shipped to UK. Without this license, it will be stuck at UK customs. Can anyone kindly advice me on this?

 

there's a couple of solutions available but I must hasten to add that I've never encountered getting a 'license' before when importing gear with batteries into the UK... if you put the value of the Hugo on the Customs-Form the receiver in the UK will be hit with VAT & Customs. The obvious way to send the Hugo back would be 'for repair, with no value' via a Courier, wherever possible I try to use UPS as they are the easiest to deal with... you might also want to consider sending the Hugo via EMS-Tracked, I've used this service from Japan & Hong-Kong with no problems whatsoever though the service takes 1-2days longer... if you're sill encountering problems about sending 'for repair', send it as a 'product sample with no value' that should negate any problems but ensure you use a Courier as delivery will be guaranteed, hth.


Edited by OK-Guy - Today at 6:21 am
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