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Asgard 2 + Bifrost (Uber Analog) Achieved—Few Final Questions!

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

Hey Head-Fi'ers,

 

After much research and budget breaking decisions, I finally got my hands on an amazing DAC (Bifrost), and AMP (Asgard 2)! :D

 

Holy jesus, I have been missing out.  I matched the duo with a pair of Sennheiser HD 650's.  I think I honestly had an eargasm for the first time, lol.

 

Joking aside, I have a few final questions before I stop harassing this website any further.  Before I ask however, I'll briefly explain my setup to avoid confusion.  Right now from my computer SPDIF, (which has a built in sound card that goes up to 24 Bits 192000 Hz) I have optical out connecting to the DAC.  Following that of course I have the RCA (Red+White) going to the AMP.  From the AMP; I'm using the Sennheiser HD 650 @ 300 Ohms.

 

 

Easy Question:

 

On the Asgard 2; would you recommend a Low Gain 1.5 (3.5db) or High Gain 6 (15.7db)?

 

I'm switching back and forth whilst controlling the volume levels from the dial so I don't blow my ears/headphones out, and can't figure out if there is a significant difference worth mentioning.  What would you guys recommend, and why?

 

Hard Question:

 

How come when I switch my sound to 24 Bits 192000 Hz; there is no sound?

 

Right now it's at 24 Bits 96000 Hz and it's working fine.  I remember reading that the DAC+AMP combo is capable of doing what I sought above, but no avail.  I was curious if the advertised setting it was capable of going up to is the USB version only with the Driver installed from their website.  Albeit the sound is beyond amazing; it will bug me a little I can't push my sound card from the computer a little further.

 

I will mention if I put the sound to 19k Hz repeatedly, I do hear a very slight quarter of a millisecond white noise before it's gone.  I'm curious if this DAC is actually unscrambling the music so it's playing at 19k Hz if that makes any sense—but I have no idea.

 

 

Thank you so very much again for taking the time to read, and I sincerely look forward to any of your replies.  This website has been beyond amazing, and will recommend it to everyone.

post #2 of 12
Thread Starter 

Well, I finally figured out my second question.  I'm speaking with Asus directly right now hoping they can help me out.

 

Number 2 relates to me best.  Already checked my BIOS, curious if I update anything.

 
Quote from Schiit Troubleshooting DAC Problems:
No 24/176.4 or 24/192 from Optical
 
1. Apple computers lock down the optical output above 24/96. If you’re using a Mac, that’s all you get. Complain to Apple.
 
2. Many PCs also cannot output anything higher than 24/96 on optical. Even if the PC claims higher than 24/96 on optical, the BIOS or drivers may not be able to enable it. Check the manufacturer’s website.
 
3. Many longer optical cables will struggle with 24/192 data rates. Use a short, high-quality optical cable, and consider glass fiber.

 

Just a matter of high or low gain now, hmm..

post #3 of 12
Yeah, sorry I didn't get on sooner, but yeah if you want higher sampling you'll have to go rca cable route, which is not a bad route to go.

Your 300 ohm headphones can go either way, personally I think I prefer low gain, but if you hit distortion at higher volumes then have to switch, just make sure to set the volume all the way down first
post #4 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by flailure View Post

Yeah, sorry I didn't get on sooner, but yeah if you want higher sampling you'll have to go rca cable route, which is not a bad route to go.

Your 300 ohm headphones can go either way, personally I think I prefer low gain, but if you hit distortion at higher volumes then have to switch, just make sure to set the volume all the way down first

What?

post #5 of 12

I was referring the problem that he solved himself, the limited (and i say limited in a not so bad way, since very few of us have source files that are higher than 96khz anyways) sampling rate on optical cables.  There are some work arounds for optical to go higher, but easiest is analog rca, or if those are not on the computer, a line out (not speaker out) with a 3.5 to rca splitter.  For 150 dollars more he could add the usb to the uberfrost and go that route too.  I think Yujiza is fine though at 96 on optical, and I love not having any metal wires connecting the computer to the dac/amp.

post #6 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by flailure View Post
 

I was referring the problem that he solved himself, the limited (and i say limited in a not so bad way, since very few of us have source files that are higher than 96khz anyways) sampling rate on optical cables.  There are some work arounds for optical to go higher, but easiest is analog rca, or if those are not on the computer, a line out (not speaker out) with a 3.5 to rca splitter.  For 150 dollars more he could add the usb to the uberfrost and go that route too.  I think Yujiza is fine though at 96 on optical, and I love not having any metal wires connecting the computer to the dac/amp.

So what's the point of the DAC then?

post #7 of 12
Because the line out splitter to rca usually sounds worse, much better with the digital out to the dac. Even at lower sampling rates
post #8 of 12
I think the confusion here is that by "RCA" you were referring to coax digital, not the analog lineout. The terminology in digital audio is confusing - S/PDIF can refer to either coax or optical, RCA can be used for either analog or digital. TOSLINK is optical. Heck, there are even 3.5mm digital interconnects. I think that according to the spec, coax digital (S/PDIF) is supposed to be an orange colored RCA jack.
post #9 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by billybob_jcv View Post

I think the confusion here is that by "RCA" you were referring to coax digital, not the analog lineout. The terminology in digital audio is confusing - S/PDIF can refer to either coax or optical, RCA can be used for either analog or digital. TOSLINK is optical. Heck, there are even 3.5mm digital interconnects. I think that according to the spec, coax digital (S/PDIF) is supposed to be an orange colored RCA jack.

 

Just to add - RCA (as in the company) made those jacks and plugs. So basically, when we say "RCA" in terms of cables, strictly speaking we're only referring to the round, dipole jacks and plugs. One has to be more specific when referring to coax digital and analog interconnections.

post #10 of 12
Thread Starter 

A whole lot of confusion but I think I got it!

 

It sort of does bug me a bit that I can't get 24/192 out of the computer for the DAC+AMP to take advantage of.  Kinda curious where I can the digital coax from the back of the computer is there was one to begin with.  Even if I did, would there be a quality or power difference so I can even push 24/192 anyway.

 

It's very close in sound, but it feels like I should have an ocd in this aspect.  I payed a lot of money; more than I ever did for sound equipment and can't help but feel like perhaps there could have been more.  I spoke with Asus, and they actually wanted to RMA it.  I'm in no position to give a board away when it's probably not it's fault.  Curious if there was a solution otherwise.

post #11 of 12
Why are you making this so difficult? Why not just connect a USB cable to the Bifrost and be done? You don't even need a soundcard in your computer for music - the Bifrost will be your soundcard. If you are using the soundcard's optical out, then the only thing your soundcard is doing is reformatting the digital media file into a S/PDIF digital signal - the Bifrost is actually doing all the real work.
post #12 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by billybob_jcv View Post

Why are you making this so difficult? Why not just connect a USB cable to the Bifrost and be done? You don't even need a soundcard in your computer for music - the Bifrost will be your soundcard. If you are using the soundcard's optical out, then the only thing your soundcard is doing is reformatting the digital media file into a S/PDIF digital signal - the Bifrost is actually doing all the real work.


Cause he probably didn't pay for the USB input on the Bifrost.

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