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The $25 DIY Headphone Stand Guide

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 

I thought I'd throw a guide up here for anyone interested in making a similar headphone stand. It's functional, cheap, and aesthetically pleasing...at least to my eyes. :happy_face1:

 

 

 

 

 

Items Needed:

 

1.     1.) Rubbermaid Hose Hook - $15

2.     2.) PVC coupler and cap - $4

3      3.) Sticky back felt - $4

4.     4.) Nut and bolt - $1

5.     5.) Electrical Tape (or any kind of black tape, really) - $1

 

Tools Needed:

 

1.     1.) Knife/Scissors

2.     2.) Screw driver

3.     3.) Wrench/Pliers

 

Time Required: ~ 1 hour

 

 

Step 1.) Buy necessary items. Here’s a shot of what I actually had to buy as I had the other materials on hand (total cost ~$23).

 

 

Step 2.) Remove the plastic clip from the Rubbermaid Hose Hook. On the model I had, it was as simple as prying the clips off with a flat head screw driver. Once the clip is removed, there should be an exposed pre-drilled hole that we will use later to secure the PVC.

 

Note: There are different models of the hose hook but most have a pre-drilled hole in some area of the clamp. There are actually two on the Rubbermaid model. The one I used is centered over the clip.

 

 

Step 3.) Tape together the PVC coupler and cap. This is temporary so don’t use too much tape. Mine looked like this:

 

 

Step. 4) Fit the PVC (taped together) over the mounting bracket (the metal piece on the top) of the hose hook and find where the pre-drilled hole is in comparison to the PVC pipe. Mark that area on the PVC as you will need to drill a hole to slot a bolt up through the PVC and metal clamp of the hose hook.

 

Step. 5) Remove the tape from the PVC to separate the pieces again and drill a hole in the marked area of the PVC pipe. Here was my result using an X-ACTO knife as I didn’t have my drill on hand.

 

Note: The pre-drilled hole in the hose hook may need to be widened depending on the bolt you use.

 

 

 

Step 6.) Once the hole has been made in the PVC pipe, tape the coupler and cap together again. You should be generous with the tape this time as it will not need to be removed from this point onward. Now would also be a good time to test the fit (bolt through bottom of PVC, then up through hose hook clamp). If the fit is good, go ahead and secure a nut on the end of the bolt which is now inside the PVC and on top of the metal clamp of the hose hook.

 

Step 7.) With the PVC secured to the hose hook clamp with a nut and bolt, add a base layer of felt to the PVC (I chose green as I didn’t have enough black for multiple layers).

 

Step 8.) Once I had a single layer of green felt, I took a small piece of black felt and shaped it over the back of the hose hook clamp and front of the PVC cap. I taped the edges of the black felt to the base layer as there will be another layer going on top. Only the back is covered by felt in the picture below, but the PVC cap looked identical before adding a layer of black felt.

 

 

Step 9.) Add as many layers of black felt over the base layer, and taped edges) so that the end result looks something like this:

 

 

 

Step 10.) Enjoy!


Edited by RockCrayfish - 1/27/14 at 4:20am
post #2 of 14

Absolutely neat DIY project and fool proof instructions, thanks for sharing !

post #3 of 14

Neat , I use scales 

 

*

 

I made a alteration video for Non-Removable cables too on my YouTube Channel 

 



Main question I get asked "Will it damage the headband ?" for the past year I have faced zero problems :)

 

And the construction cost is < $3


Edited by MrTechAgent - 1/28/14 at 6:27am
post #4 of 14

Good one, Agent. Scales = Ruler (in US).

post #5 of 14
Thread Starter 
Thanks guys.

I was using rubberized hooks that were screwed into the side of my desk and although I'm sure they wouldn't damage the HD600, I was interested in an affordable tabletop stand.


MrTechAgent,

Those look awesome! Very clean.
Edited by RockCrayfish - 3/7/14 at 7:50pm
post #6 of 14

Great work & instructions mate, and I must say the stand looks very professional.

post #7 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by RockCrayfish View Post

MrTechAgent,

Those look awesome! Very clean looking.

 

Thanks , the only side affect being working with the glue that can ruin your life :P

Quote:
Originally Posted by ramaka View Post
 

Good one, Agent. Scales = Ruler (in US).

Right :P

post #8 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrTechAgent View Post
 

 

Thanks , the only side affect being working with the glue that can ruin your life :P

 

Ha! It was definitely worth it though; Those ruler-hangers look great. 

post #9 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by RockCrayfish View Post
 

 

Ha! It was definitely worth it though; Those ruler-hangers look great. 

Thanks ...I would love to use yours but I don't have sufficient desk space :(

post #10 of 14
Thread Starter 

Yeah, the footprint of most desktop headphone stands is fairly large. I had to shuffle around the items on my desk to make mine fit. :) 

post #11 of 14

Great instructions!  I just finished building these.

 

I ended up using regular felt sheets, and using rubber cement to glue them down.  I also used duct tape to tape the PCV pieces together, since it seemed stronger than electrical tape to me.

post #12 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Davinator View Post
 

Great instructions!  I just finished building these.

 

I ended up using regular felt sheets, and using rubber cement to glue them down.  I also used duct tape to tape the PCV pieces together, since it seemed stronger than electrical tape to me.

 

Thanks! Duct tape is definitely stronger but, unfortunately, I didn't have any on hand. It sounds like you've created the $25 hose hook stand version 2.0! 

 

Pics?

post #13 of 14

Well, they're still on my workbench so it's a little dirty in the background.  Here's what they look like though!

 

The other thing I did was I cut the couplings in half.  The PVC couplings I found at Lowes made the part where the headphones hang on were too long.  By cutting them in half, it made it the perfect length.  I think my finished product was the same size as yours though.

 

 

 

post #14 of 14
Thread Starter 

They look great! I think I like the look of the rounded felt over the end of the PVC cap on yours more than the flat "face" on mine. And yes, they do look to be about the same size.

 

I'm glad the instructions were of some help to you.

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