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Philips Golden Ears challenge - Page 18

post #256 of 267
Quote:
Originally Posted by LuckyEars View Post
 

I'm 22 and my upper limit is 19kHz. I think you might have an advantage with the gear you are using :D   

I'm using the Sony MH1, which is a bit too forgiving when it comes to voices. I will try the test again with different gear when I have the time.

I found the reverb questions to be straight forward, though. 


Maybe IEMs would pick it up easier. Hmm. Is there any audible music up at 19kHz? 

post #257 of 267

The sony MH1 I used are IEMs. I don't think so. 19 kHz is also very piercing and uncomfortable to listen to (so is 18 kHz imo). I wonder what 21 kHz must be like. @bob439 posted that his hearing cuts off at 21kHz.

post #258 of 267
Quote:
Originally Posted by LuckyEars View Post
 

The sony MH1 I used are IEMs. I don't think so. 19 kHz is also very piercing and uncomfortable to listen to (so is 18 kHz imo). I wonder what 21 kHz must be like. @bob439 posted that his hearing cuts off at 21kHz.


Oh I meant to say maybe reverb is more noticeable on IEMs as soundstage is more compressed and possibly impacting the sound more.

post #259 of 267

That could be.

 

I know that high-hats can produce sounds above 21 kHz, but the majority of sounds produced by instruments are at frequencies below 5k 

 

Take a look at this one, if you are interested:

http://www.head-fi.org/a/frequency-response-of-headphones

post #260 of 267
Quote:
Originally Posted by darkless View Post
 

 

My upper frequency hearing limit using an EQ'ed LCD-X is around 16,5 KHz. I could easily handle the 96 kbps, not so easily the 112 kbps and the 128 kbps was almost impossible. In the beginning I tried to listen for tremolo of the cymbals/whiskers. When that didn't pan out I then tried to focus on the sharpness of the bass pluckings. Also didn't work. Finally I tried focusing on the male vocal. It was difficult because the distance between the mic and the singer's head seemed to vary throughout the sample. Therefore I attempted to A/B using specific passages. In the end I chose the samples where the male vocal was ever so slightly softer, but I still feel like there was a not insignificant amount of sheer luck involved. Tired ears certainly didn't help.

 

I didn't notice much reverb in the vocal myself. I suspect the LCD-X isn't the best can for listening to reverb decay trails, as it's pretty well damped and doesn't enhance or prolong echoes in any way. I tried using the SE846 as well, but that was completely hopeless, as it doesn't have much output in the upper treble region.

 There are no fundamental frequencies with these musical samples that require hearing above 16.5 KHz.  Anything at that range or above is mostly masked from the lower frequencies anyway.  These are not pure test tones.

 

Sound frequency doubles with each octave.  The difference between 16.5 KHz and 20 KHz covers only about a minor third interval, or 3 semitones (3 half steps).  Not too significant at all.

post #261 of 267

I've run through to the end of silver ears while my son watches cartoons with my surface RT and AKG K551s, most of it is much easier than getting to level seven here at Harman, but some parts are different; the hardest parts for me where the 2db treble boost and MP3 artifacts.

post #262 of 267

Maybe :) In my experience, I think the reverb is a lot more clear on big cans, because they can better portray soundstage and layering, but thats just my opinion.  

post #263 of 267

I was trying the mp3 artifacts again, and I found that if you listen carefully to the guitar, it is actually quite easy to tell them apart. You can clearly hear the plucking of the strings on the reference, while it is not as audible on the 128kbps. With this method I could tell them apart 10 out of 10 times.

 

My music library is mainly in 128kbps .... Now I have to re-rip my whole cd collection ..... :eek:    

 


Edited by LuckyEars - 12/21/14 at 3:38pm
post #264 of 267

I just came across the golden ears test and its pretty cool. I am 38 and have been working in a machine shop for over 20 years so my hearing is shot to hell. More then half of my work life I never wore hearing protection. Just made an account need time away from the kids to do this. I am using a set of Shure SRH840  got past the first part but I am sure I wont get to far since I cant hear crap out of my right ear LOL.

post #265 of 267

I find the test boring, I wish I could skip the early levels, because it literally takes me 1 second to tell the correct answer and then I have to wait for test to change. It's more waiting than listening. I wish I could skip to the hardest tests immediately.

post #266 of 267
Quote:
Originally Posted by derbigpr View Post
 

I find the test boring, I wish I could skip the early levels, because it literally takes me 1 second to tell the correct answer and then I have to wait for test to change. It's more waiting than listening. I wish I could skip to the hardest tests immediately.

I do agree, the beginning was depressingly easy. But its geared to someone who has never done any critical listening in the first stages.

post #267 of 267

I'm stuck at 93% completed. Only things left are that 18 band frequency test and quiz. I just can't bother memorizing all 18 differences. Some of them are so close to each other.. So I'm done.

 

MP3 bitrate proved to be bit challenging at the beginning and reverb too but eventually learned to hear the difference. Had some difficulties with the last high frequency cut off one too. Everything else was quite easy.

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