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Schiit Happened: The Story of the World's Most Improbable Start-Up - Page 63

post #931 of 3938
Quote:
Originally Posted by judmarc View Post

But more seriously, have a look at Rocky Mountain Audio Fest videos of presentations by people like Keith Johnson, and think about how he takes a much more (literally) "outside the box" view of common problems with audio systems, focusing on system-wide interactions.  Or consider the age-old argument about whether power cords matter.  You can look at the power cord alone and be stuck in the same old back-and-forth: "But I hear a difference!"  "But you can't from 3 feet of wire!"  Or you can look at it from a system perspective and with a couple of bucks worth of parts you can make your transformer much less subject to "ringing" behavior and thus tremendously reduce or eliminate any sonic difference from power cords.  (Google "snubber circuit," "Hagerman," and "John Swenson.")

Ok, I get where you're coming from now with the comment. I was having trouble understanding the context. I totally agree that a whole-system approach to design will always give better results. As a chemical engineer, I've seen a lot of systems fall apart because one part of the system was designed separately and does not "talk" to the rest of the system. PID loops are single in-single out as well, so that causes a lot of horrible problems since people are too cheap to implement more elaborate control schemes.

post #932 of 3938
Quote:
Originally Posted by SoupRKnowva View Post
 

 

There is a reason why I am so pumped for the Yggy, way more than I am for the Ragnarok, and it's cause of the fact that its going to be a ladder dac and this filter...cant wait to see it! Im thinking it's going to be as advanced as some of the best computer based digital filtering out there, but without needing all the computer horsepower.

 

Now we just need to know if it will have i2s, via either hdmi preferably or rj45 if not...

 

+1

 

The trick is laser trimming those resistors for matching just so... :wink:   And in combo with FPGA filtering with the newer technology chips now available...  Please just let me be still able to say Schiit and affordable in the same breath.

 

EDIT:  Just read elsewhere that the 18K+ timing interpolation filter taps going to be via a DSP processor (+ the 1917 paper algorithm) and not FPGA, like some other recent products (e.g. Chord Hugo).

 

So you're blown away by the input HDMI I2S convertor board as well?  I still can't break away from the AD chip board long enough to try out the rave TI chip one.

 

EDIT:  Checked my source, and evidently you're not one of the DIY board recipients.  No soup for you!  :wink:  Apologies.


Edited by jacal01 - 4/26/14 at 5:36pm
post #933 of 3938
Quote:
Originally Posted by Silent One View Post
 

 

 

Developed by "Slide Rule" is equally amazing.

 

Amazing what one can do with 3 significant figures; 4 if you close one eye and squint with the other...  :wink:


Edited by jacal01 - 4/26/14 at 5:34pm
post #934 of 3938
Quote:
Originally Posted by Xcalibur255 View Post
 

All the best things in audio just might have been conceived in the 1910's.  :tongue_smile:   The 45 triodes in my headphone amp are a testament to that.

+1

And how 'bout this, my Shindo Laboratory kit even when new is stuffed with a number of old NOS parts. :p

post #935 of 3938
Quote:
Originally Posted by sludgeogre View Post

Ok, I get where you're coming from now with the comment. I was having trouble understanding the context.

Yeah, sorry about that. I was thinking about trying to explain that a bit more but decided the comment was already pretty long.
post #936 of 3938
Quote:
Originally Posted by cjl View Post

I know this is a popular viewpoint, but the full flight manual (including performance charts) is declassified and available online. Top speed is limited by a compressor inlet temp of 427C, which falls somewhere around mach 3.0 to 3.5, depending on ambient conditions (primarily the air temperature at ~75-85k feet). Here's the manual - it can be very interesting to look through (and it was definitely an astonishing aircraft, and it would still be even if it were made today, much less in the 60s...)

 

http://www.sr-71.org/blackbird/manual/

 

Here's the speed chart: http://www.sr-71.org/blackbird/manual/5/5-9.php

Here's another chart showing max speed vs ambient temperature (based on the inlet temp capability): http://www.sr-71.org/blackbird/manual/5/5-10.php

 

Note that in extremely cold ambient conditions, it does show a capability for higher than mach 3.3, and it probably could push up as high as mach 3.5 or so if the external conditions were just right, but it isn't something it could do routinely without risking engine damage (the reason for the CIT limitation). In addition, if you do the shock angle analysis for what speed the SR-71 would be traveling when the nose shock starts to encounter the wingtips, you end up with a mach number of around 3.3 or so, which further supports that its true design top speed was in this neighborhood. That having been said, sustained cruise at mach 3.2 is nothing to sneeze at - it's still the fastest manned aircraft ever built that could take off under its own power, and the only other ones that ever got even close could not sustain that kind of speed for very long (as opposed to the SR-71, which could cruise at M3.2 for an entire tank of gas without difficulty).

 



Huh, you don't post often it would seem, but I really enjoyed reading this, thanks for posting it! even though it was mostly off topic.
post #937 of 3938

As a retired teacher it is so refreshing in this age of im chat/tweet to read a complete (non run on) sentence with actual punctuation.  I echo the other hf members in telling you thanks for such a great story so well written. If you recall any teachers who influenced you why not give them a mention.

Regards, John

post #938 of 3938
Quote:
Originally Posted by Silent One View Post
 

+1

And how 'bout this, my Shindo Laboratory kit even when new is stuffed with a number of old NOS parts. :p

Jeepers - you should return it and demand an all "new" one !!  :P

post #939 of 3938
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jason Stoddard View Post
 

Oh, and Yggy's digital filter? 18,000+ taps, running a proprietary algorithm based on a 1917 Western Electric paper on time-domain optimization (yes, nine-teen seven-teen, 1917), perfected by a Professor Emeritus of Mathematics at Iowa State (to get around the divide-by-zero problem) and implemented by a RAND Corp mathematician. 

How did you even find that paper? Where you actually looking in academia or did you just happen upon it? Sounds too convenient to be true haha.

post #940 of 3938
Quote:
Originally Posted by SoupRKnowva View Post

Huh, you don't post often it would seem, but I really enjoyed reading this, thanks for posting it! even though it was mostly off topic.

It's true that I mostly lurk (especially outside of the sound science forum, where I do emerge from time to time), but my degree is in aerospace engineering with a focus on high speed fluid dynamics, so if I see a post about something like the SR-71, I can hopefully contribute something interesting and/or useful :smile:

post #941 of 3938

Ok so I gotta ask… :thumb

 

At the boundary layer?

 

JJ 

post #942 of 3938

O.K. The Schiit web site was down during the night, and it's 17:30 now in the UK and it's still down. What's happening? Not that I'm worried, of course...

    ___

"'«{°î°}»'"

    """""

post #943 of 3938

It's up and perfectly fine.

post #944 of 3938
Quote:
Originally Posted by paradoxper View Post
It's up and perfectly fine.

+1

post #945 of 3938

http://www.downforeveryoneorjustme.com/ is a good way to check that kind of thing...

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