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Schiit Happened: The Story of the World's Most Improbable Start-Up - Page 6

post #76 of 1827

Chapter a week?  I might have time to get some good schiit before the story ends!  Looking forward to this. 

post #77 of 1827

subbed

post #78 of 1827

This is brilliant, on so many different levels, I'm not sure I can count them all.

 

I always applaud creativity and this thread, and its related subject matter, ties together so many aspects, it will be a joy to follow and see how they interact and develop.

 

I do own some really great Schiit and look forward to what the future has in store.

 

JJ

post #79 of 1827

The second chapter reminds me of something that I experienced in the early 80's, while working for a major Japanese audio company (name is unimportant).

 

One of the guys I worked with came to me one evening, and told me of a moonlighting opportunity at an electronics retailer a few miles away. This retailer needed experienced electronic techs to come repair equipment. I was interested, so I decided to show up one night to try my hand at it.

 

We were paid a percentage of the repair bill, which is probably the wrong way to encourage a repair technician. Gear that was under warranty didn't pay much, so people tended to dig into the high profit margin repairs. I was the new guy, so I got the stuff that others didn't want to deal with.

 

The very first rig I was given was a big reel to reel tape deck. It was a warranty job that had been sitting unrepaired for months. So I sat down and took a look. One of the reels didn't spin, so tape would come off one reel and spill onto the floor. I popped open the case and took a look at what was connecting the reel deck to the motor. Turned out that there was a loose screw on the shaft that connected to the motor on that reel. I tightened the screws and bingo, working tape deck. Took me all of about 20 minutes.

 

Then I made the mistake of writing up the repair ticket honestly. When the owner of the shop saw what I'd written, he literally blew up in my face. "I can't give this back to the customer with this explanation!" he whined. Really wasn't my fault, but he made me scribble out what I'd written on the repair ticket and come up with a phony story how it took a long time to repair blah blah lie lie bs bs... I think I made $10 bucks on that job.

 

One of the next jobs was fixing an old, cheap turntable for an old lady. I tinkered with this old turntable for a good half hour, but I couldn't find anything wrong with it. So I wrote the ticket up honestly again, and sure enough, the boss blew his cork again. He again insisted I write up that I'd spent much more time repairing it than I did, add charges for cleaning chemicals and other crap, and charge her - for nothing.

 

I experienced a couple more like this, and one night I decided to blow up on HIM. I told this man that I simply could not continue to work at a company that consistently lied to its customers, and walked out. I didn't care about being paid. I just left. I don't have the kind of conscience that lets me do that to other people.

 

Back at the shop the next day, the man who originally told me about this job, told me about what the boss said after I left. It was funny and sad at the same time, but the rest of the guys just kept working for him. I guess they didn't care. My friend reminded me that working for a retailer was different than a major manufacturer. I suppose he was right - but I didn't want anything to do with it.

 

It is rare to find people who have the veracity and integrity to treat people with honesty and respect, and give good value for the money. That is clearly a large part of the Schiit success story.

post #80 of 1827
Quote:
Originally Posted by UmustBKidn View Post
 

The second chapter reminds me of something that I experienced in the early 80's, while working for a major Japanese audio company (name is unimportant).

 

One of the guys I worked with came to me one evening, and told me of a moonlighting opportunity at an electronics retailer a few miles away. This retailer needed experienced electronic techs to come repair equipment. I was interested, so I decided to show up one night to try my hand at it.

 

We were paid a percentage of the repair bill, which is probably the wrong way to encourage a repair technician. Gear that was under warranty didn't pay much, so people tended to dig into the high profit margin repairs. I was the new guy, so I got the stuff that others didn't want to deal with.

 

The very first rig I was given was a big reel to reel tape deck. It was a warranty job that had been sitting unrepaired for months. So I sat down and took a look. One of the reels didn't spin, so tape would come off one reel and spill onto the floor. I popped open the case and took a look at what was connecting the reel deck to the motor. Turned out that there was a loose screw on the shaft that connected to the motor on that reel. I tightened the screws and bingo, working tape deck. Took me all of about 20 minutes.

 

Then I made the mistake of writing up the repair ticket honestly. When the owner of the shop saw what I'd written, he literally blew up in my face. "I can't give this back to the customer with this explanation!" he whined. Really wasn't my fault, but he made me scribble out what I'd written on the repair ticket and come up with a phony story how it took a long time to repair blah blah lie lie bs bs... I think I made $10 bucks on that job.

 

One of the next jobs was fixing an old, cheap turntable for an old lady. I tinkered with this old turntable for a good half hour, but I couldn't find anything wrong with it. So I wrote the ticket up honestly again, and sure enough, the boss blew his cork again. He again insisted I write up that I'd spent much more time repairing it than I did, add charges for cleaning chemicals and other crap, and charge her - for nothing.

 

I experienced a couple more like this, and one night I decided to blow up on HIM. I told this man that I simply could not continue to work at a company that consistently lied to its customers, and walked out. I didn't care about being paid. I just left. I don't have the kind of conscience that lets me do that to other people.

 

Back at the shop the next day, the man who originally told me about this job, told me about what the boss said after I left. It was funny and sad at the same time, but the rest of the guys just kept working for him. I guess they didn't care. My friend reminded me that working for a retailer was different than a major manufacturer. I suppose he was right - but I didn't want anything to do with it.

 

It is rare to find people who have the veracity and integrity to treat people with honesty and respect, and give good value for the money. That is clearly a large part of the Schiit success story.

the level of honesty one has when no one is looking

some got it, some don't

post #81 of 1827

Can't wait for "Chapter 2: 15 Years On the Marketing Front Lines"! 

post #82 of 1827
Quote:
Originally Posted by UmustBKidn View Post
 

The second chapter reminds me of something that I experienced in the early 80's, while working for a major Japanese audio company (name is unimportant).

 

One of the guys I worked with came to me one evening, and told me of a moonlighting opportunity at an electronics retailer a few miles away. This retailer needed experienced electronic techs to come repair equipment. I was interested, so I decided to show up one night to try my hand at it.

 

We were paid a percentage of the repair bill, which is probably the wrong way to encourage a repair technician. Gear that was under warranty didn't pay much, so people tended to dig into the high profit margin repairs. I was the new guy, so I got the stuff that others didn't want to deal with.

 

The very first rig I was given was a big reel to reel tape deck. It was a warranty job that had been sitting unrepaired for months. So I sat down and took a look. One of the reels didn't spin, so tape would come off one reel and spill onto the floor. I popped open the case and took a look at what was connecting the reel deck to the motor. Turned out that there was a loose screw on the shaft that connected to the motor on that reel. I tightened the screws and bingo, working tape deck. Took me all of about 20 minutes.

 

Then I made the mistake of writing up the repair ticket honestly. When the owner of the shop saw what I'd written, he literally blew up in my face. "I can't give this back to the customer with this explanation!" he whined. Really wasn't my fault, but he made me scribble out what I'd written on the repair ticket and come up with a phony story how it took a long time to repair blah blah lie lie bs bs... I think I made $10 bucks on that job.

 

One of the next jobs was fixing an old, cheap turntable for an old lady. I tinkered with this old turntable for a good half hour, but I couldn't find anything wrong with it. So I wrote the ticket up honestly again, and sure enough, the boss blew his cork again. He again insisted I write up that I'd spent much more time repairing it than I did, add charges for cleaning chemicals and other crap, and charge her - for nothing.

 

I experienced a couple more like this, and one night I decided to blow up on HIM. I told this man that I simply could not continue to work at a company that consistently lied to its customers, and walked out. I didn't care about being paid. I just left. I don't have the kind of conscience that lets me do that to other people.

 

Back at the shop the next day, the man who originally told me about this job, told me about what the boss said after I left. It was funny and sad at the same time, but the rest of the guys just kept working for him. I guess they didn't care. My friend reminded me that working for a retailer was different than a major manufacturer. I suppose he was right - but I didn't want anything to do with it.

 

It is rare to find people who have the veracity and integrity to treat people with honesty and respect, and give good value for the money. That is clearly a large part of the Schiit success story.

This why I am currently unemployed :)

 

It's amazing how ubiquitous terrible behavior, outright lies and illegal acts are in major corporations (Well, any entity) to do with retail, and yet nothing ever seems to be done about it. I walked out of my job because I was tired of corrupt, immoral and unempathetic acts and strategies. Sometimes outright illegal behavior and actions. Yet if you didn't tow the line you were completely vilified.

I applaud you for your ethics good sir, at least I know there are some others like me out there and the world isn't completely corrupt. Yet. :beerchug: 

post #83 of 1827
subscribed...
really interested in buying your Bifrost usb uber!
post #84 of 1827

This is a quote from Jason's introduction to the Vali-quintessential Schiit value/integrity:

"But we don't do the hard sell, nor do we price things at any more than we have to, regardless of what they sound like."

 

Schiit could have put the Vali in a more expensive chassis and sold it for so much more and people would have not thought twice. But that's not the Schiit value.  Applause, applause. 

post #85 of 1827

Nice piece of Schiit :) Subscribed!

post #86 of 1827

This is definitely going to create more Schiit following.  

post #87 of 1827

Extremely happy owner of the Magni/Modi, cannot wait to read all of this!

post #88 of 1827

don't own any shiit ! but I want to read the rest of this shiit ! amazing story...

post #89 of 1827

In.

post #90 of 1827

Subscribed.

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