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Schiit Happened: The Story of the World's Most Improbable Start-Up - Page 265

post #3961 of 19490

Something about glass houses?

post #3962 of 19490
Quote:
Originally Posted by BackToAnalogue View Post

I think that would be a pretty safe assumption. But there is no such thing as 'simply being facetious' it takes a lot of effort as you know.

If people on this thread enjoy Jason's writing then they must enjoy his sense of humour and irony, right? So how come they don't get the jokes? You guys made Frasier.

 

Only maybe safe with some hindsight and follow-up postings. Sarcasm and deadpan humor are not so obvious on forums, trust me.  That's why I try to be not too subtle in my posts and liberal with winky face sprinklings.

 

But in the case of tonykaz, I believe that he was actually trying to be humorous in a misunderstanding sort of way. And ad hominem attacks however tongue-in-cheek are always dangerous territory and subject to misinterpretation. People are sensitive to any sort of construed criticism on these public forums, including me.


Edited by jacal01 - 11/25/14 at 4:12pm
post #3963 of 19490
Quote:
Originally Posted by jacal01 View Post
 

 

Only maybe safe with some hindsight and follow-up postings. Sarcasm and deadpan humor are not so obvious on forums, trust me.  That's why I try to be not too subtle in my posts and liberal with winky face sprinklings.

 

But in the case of tonykaz, I believe that he was actually trying to be humorous in a misunderstanding sort of way. And ad hominem attacks however tongue-in-cheek are always dangerous territory and subject to misinterpretation. People are sensitive to any sort of construed criticism on these public forums, including me.

True. Sarcasm, irony & similar things often depend on emphasis on certain words, a special tone while talking, pauses, facial expressions  etc.... which don't exist in writing. We simply cannot write the same way we would talk directly to a person, and then expect every reader to understand what we mean without further explanation. People who have that sort of "flow of mind" way of writing tend to run into that problem sooner or later....

Simply put: talking and writing are not identical ways of communication.

post #3964 of 19490
Quote:
Originally Posted by AiDee View Post

Back on topic? Look at Jason's thread title...improbability rules here dude tongue.gif

 

Are you suggesting that Yggdrasil will use Infinite Improbability Drive?

 

Too cool!

 

Now where did I leave my towel?

post #3965 of 19490
Quote:
Originally Posted by 45longcolt View Post
 

 

Are you suggesting that Yggdrasil will use Infinite Improbability Drive?

 

Too cool!

 

Now where did I leave my towel?


Don't worry I think my Babel fish may be sick I've been having some issues translating some posts lately.

post #3966 of 19490
Quote:
Originally Posted by 45longcolt View Post
 

 

Are you suggesting that Yggdrasil will use Infinite Improbability Drive?

 

Too cool!

 

Now where did I leave my towel?

 

I mourn the whale.

post #3967 of 19490
Quote:
Originally Posted by 45longcolt View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by AiDee View Post

Back on topic? Look at Jason's thread title...improbability rules here dude tongue.gif

 

Are you suggesting that Yggdrasil will use Infinite Improbability Drive?

 

Too cool!

 

Now where did I leave my towel?

Another great English invention. Such a pity they lost the manual.:angry_face:

post #3968 of 19490


Sarcasm Meters ?  

 

What a clever idea !  

 

Hmm , Sarcasm is Anger isn't it ?  

 

Anyway , hello jacal01 , 

 

I was just feeling silly , probably from taking my old person medications , getting a bit "stoned" myself ….

 

Tony in Michigan

post #3969 of 19490

You could start with this and modify it a bit for a truly interactive experience! :atsmile:

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yqmqmvalVvE

 

JJ

post #3970 of 19490

It is with mounting trepidation that I navigate this thread as of late as I find that my mind is becoming exceedingly exercised and vexed with all the off topic verbiage that finds it's way into this usually highly informative thread in a way which induces me to attempt to keep up with the current topic under discussion with a sense that I am falling behind like a man on crutches in a marathon race all the while soldiering on in the misguided belief that it will all make sense in the end and yet with the nagging feeling of a foreboding doom as the mental clouds gather on the horizon of my understanding and a deep and growing conviction that the finish line is receding at a greater pace than my forward progress and on top of that there is the continual and ever increasing change in the off topic subjects and misunderstanding generated thereby which have to be navigated with extreme caution lest I myself should be seen to be adding to the noise that all this discussion is adding to this otherwise informative thread and the only thing that keeps me hanging on is the prospect of Jason and/or one of his cronies posting some further incisive and informative data which has the effect of spurring myself on until the next post is negotiated that once again causes a moment of despair as it is percieved that another red herring has once again thrown this thread off topic which necessitates further trepidation as one ponders on how long it will take for the resumption of topicality to be achieved whilst all the other posters here are totally oblivious to the stress this generates to those poor benighted truth seekers who come here for relevant enlightenment.

post #3971 of 19490
Quote:
 Sarcasm Meters ?

Take your pick....

 

 

And...

 

 

 

 

     images?q=tbn:ANd9GcTh1axkQ_wa9-_HpdoT2WNiGjm4cHbuW--H8MkvDYSAWgjIhKVR

 

 

 

post #3972 of 19490

Easy.  Just drop by every Wednesday for an update.  Everything else is just filler.

post #3973 of 19490
Thread Starter 

Aaaand, some more filler. I had the chapter finished, but didn't save it...so you guys are gonna have to wait a bit for me to rewrite it. Looks like later today, maybe Friday. 

 

Friday? Yeah, much better than getting suckered into the madness of Black Friday deals. Preserve your sanity. Spend some time with your family or friends, not battling sales-crazed zombies at a big box store or salivating onto the iPad screen about something that really doesn't matter in the long run.

 

I leave you with that.

 

No, wait. I'll leave you with more. It's what I thought might be a bonus chapter, but it's really too short for that. It's about change, and accepting it.

 

Right now, Taylor Swift is in the news because she's pulling her music off of Spotify. The claim, in a nutshell, is that it isn't fair to the artist when their work is available on free (ad-supported) streaming. Sony is eyeing this high-profile defection and making noises about doing the same. It looks like there may be some big changes coming to streaming, and all the talking heads are blathering about whether this is right, whether this is fair, whether this is good for the artist or bad for the artist, whether it's gonna result in more piracy, whether it's gonna make people more money, less money, or whatever, and in general being their breathless selves about what is simply, well, change.

 

Here are some simple things about creative works:

 

1. There are always more people who are creative than can make a living at it. This goes for music, books, film, etc. Unfortunately, many creative people don't realize this, or want to realize this. Please note this is not the comment of an engineer—this is the comment of someone who has written and published books, run a creative agency, and who has many friends who are authors, script writers, visual artists, etc.

 

2. People are almost always willing to pay a fair price for access to creative works, unless they are abjectly poor or a complete dick. Unfortunately, "a fair price" to the recording industry or to studios may not align with what people think is "a fair price." If CDs had been $4.99, piracy would have been much less of a problem. "Go buy your own, you cheapass," would be the standard response, rather than "Sure, rip it, screw the studios!"

 

3. If the work is too expensive, or unavailable, people will resort to other means in order to get it, including piracy and copying. Unfortunately, most of the industry doesn't realize that once they start down the piracy path, it's hard to get them back to the paying path.

 

What Swift doesn't realize is that she's the beneficiary of a fundamentally strange distribution paradigm, one that wasn't possible before reproduced sound, and one that is changing dramatically due to the death of physical distribution.

 

For a short period of time in history, a few musicians were able to make a lot of money through the act of physical distribution: pressing records or CDs and distributing them. This is a fundamentally unnatural state of affairs today, as it requires true physical scarcity to work. Today, there is no inherent physical scarcity—files can be copied and shared endlessly. This means that distribution is not the ultimate arbiter availability—and that also means they are not the ultimate arbiter of price. 

 

Or, in simple terms, people have to want to pay a price that they consider fair, or they'll simply copy it.

 

It is, quite simply, a different world. Things have changed. And the sooner you accept that, the better you'll do. It just seems that some people, and companies, have a hard time accepting the fact of change, and that they will have to adapt in order to prosper.

post #3974 of 19490

Much the same as PC software in the early days, especially games.  Illegal copying was rampant; who would pay otherwise for something that was free?  Then somewhere along the way, paying for official copies of software programs became the accepted (spelled honorable) norm.  So, it was a social behavioral shift more than an economics driven change.  Not sure exactly how that happened, but the wide open days of exchanging free software disks came to a rather abrupt end. 

post #3975 of 19490
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jason Stoddard View Post
 

Or, in simple terms, people have to want to pay a price that they consider fair, ...

 

Reminds me of Vince Gill opinion on value of music:

 

“The devaluation of music and what it’s now deemed to be worth is laughable to me. My single costs 99 cents. That’s what a [single] cost in 1960.
On my phone, I can get an app for 99 cents that makes fart noises — the same price as the thing I create and speak to the world with. Some would say the fart app is more important. It’s an awkward time. Creative brains are being sorely mistreated.”

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