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Schiit Happened: The Story of the World's Most Improbable Start-Up - Page 230

post #3436 of 19511
Quote:
Originally Posted by superjawes View Post

I have to agree with jacal01 on recognition. It doesn't need to be a plaque, award, or anything official, but an ongoing acknowledgement that I'm doing my job well and that my boss is noticing does a lot of good (at least for me). Raises and bonuses are nice, but those only happen once a year (usually), so the weekly/monthly thumbs up or "thank you" is helpful during that between time. Good bosses automatically do this, and they let you know when they're fighting for bonuses come that time. In fact, I'd be willing to bet that Jason gives this recognition without realizing it, like every time he praises his team in this thread wink.gif

Yeah, good bosses do this.  

 

Some then tell you that they appreciate everything you've done, but we're letting you go due to a reorganization and it's a cost cutting move, not a performance issue.

 

After 25 years, that made me feel much better (sarcasmfont).

 

Good boss became "ex-boss".  Not really sure that he was ever "good" (or sincere) now that I look back on it.

post #3437 of 19511
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jason Stoddard View Post

 

True quote from our accountant: "I don't know how you do all that boring technical stuff."

 

Mike and I sat there flabbergasted. But we're very happy to have an accountant who really loves what he's doing, even if we can't understand it (and think it's boring.)

 

Tell him you're thinking of acquiring another company using a reverse Morris trust and watch his eyes light up.

post #3438 of 19511
Quote:
Originally Posted by jacal01 View Post

If I can take one niggly exception to your postulate here, I personally put a lot of stock into being appreciated for my contributions and loyalty, more so than straight up salary level.  Not so much tangible feedback, I have internal standards for that, but more the sense of not feeling my extra efforts are not being taken for granted or my loyalty is not being reciprocated, that I'm not just another exploitable commodity, however highly compensated.

However, money and freedom/flexibility are quite acceptable conventional venues for conveying the feeling that your personal worth is appreciated and recognized.  I guess it's all about the yardsticks for which you chose to perceive the depths of sincerity and appreciation extended back to you for your value and commitment given.  And obviously your treatise here shows that you've not allowed yourself to become complacent and incognizant about your employees contribution to the success of Schiit.  This is another good venue for showing employee recognition.
If you don't own your job, loyalty doesn't really exist - nor does employee 'value'. Sincerity doesn't help either. Even if the owner is awesome, he or she can sell from underneath you that wonderful company at any time. The employer/employee relationship does not honor you as a stakeholder AT ALL.

That's not a slight against Jason or Schiit, mind you - it's just a sober reflection of the reality of wage work in a less-moderated capitalist system such as we have in the U.S. It's up to you how much of yourself you sell to your employer, but let's be honest about just exactly what you're getting in return.
post #3439 of 19511
Quote:
Originally Posted by muziq View Post
 


Search is your friend.


Let me rephrase that. I would like MORE impressions ... bit greedy of me, but what can I say? I'm excited.

post #3440 of 19511


It was certainly very rewarding to read Jason's account of the company move and his thoughts/ideas on staff motivation and rewards. I so agree with his sentiments, and guess what? It works. It has been proven so many times that it amazes me that more companies don't adopt these same principles of recognition and reward. Living down in Oz (after living in the USA for 26 years), it amazes me how companies here abuse their employees. I always thought that the the Aussies were a bunch of "no ********" guys but the reality of it is they are bullied and abused by the bosses and they need to realise their value and learn to just say NO to the abuse. I do and it gets their attention because they know that I know my worth and will not be devalued by them. Anyhow, great reading Jason and I salute you and Mike for your humane and intelligent treatment of your employees(not blowing smoke up your skirt).

Keep it up and I am sure that Schiit will continue to grow to greater heights and we, the consumers, will benefit from this as well. Go Schiit!  

post #3441 of 19511

This one hits rather close to home as I'm giving notice on Monday for a new job. I'm leaving because they don't allow me to do what I want and I haven't gotten a decent raise in three years. Going to a company with better pay, a bonus structure, and I'll be the only engineer there and in charge of the entire process, finally able to make real change.

 

Also, my mother is a middle school teacher and makes pretty damn good money, but she really had to work the system to get it. They give raises from attending classes and conferences so she took every weird conference she could find for a long time. She makes almost double what others are making because they never looked into how they could advance themselves. It is a weird system that you have to research and figure out to get to where you want to be. That doesn't address the part about getting harder work, though, because she's always getting the super difficult kids, from non-english speakers to kids who are so disabled they need one or two constant attendants and can't even communicate. Crazy stuff, I don't know how she does it.

post #3442 of 19511


Employee & Owner dynamics …. 

 

Jason here is probably just stating his policy or intended policy or a statement of the way he thinks "ought to be"  -- to his working staff ! 

 

Maslov long ago defined Human Needs , it's been a universal reality we've come to understand and accept .  

 

The Simple Version :  Food , Security , Social , Status , Ego   

 

That's it , just 5 , in order of priority .  

 

Meet the first need and a person will crave the second , then the third , forth and finally the 5th .  

 

Jason's Money & Freedom is what he's trying for and needing , ( I'm guessing this is only Money , need no.1 ) 

 

Professor Mike creating his Statement Piece suggests he's going for Status & Ego . ( Well established , been there , done that , he's 4 & 5 ) 

 

The hierarchy of Human Needs 

 

Personally , I hope Dr.Mike's "Big DAC" is a smash Success , a break- thru , beyond Gordon Rankin's design and I hope his Grandchildren brag about him to their peers .  

 

Tony in Michigan 

post #3443 of 19511

Looks as though Android 5.0 (enables usb audio out) will be out soon - perfect with the Schiit Fulla! :biggrin:


Edited by asuperpower - 10/23/14 at 4:54am
post #3444 of 19511
Quote:
Originally Posted by tonykaz View Post
 

 

 

Maslov long ago defined Human Needs , it's been a universal reality we've come to understand and accept .  

 

The Simple Version :  Food , Security , Social , Status , Ego   

 

You might want to look that up again. "Ego" is definitely not part of the model, the last step is self-realization (activities that correspond with your individual talents and interests) - if you don't take the 1970 revision into account, where the tip of the pyramid is transcendence. Anyway, Maslows model lacks empirical evidence ;) the priority - just to name one thing - is not so important, you can very much focus on your self-realiziation and not give a damn about social status.


Edited by AManAnd88Keys - 10/23/14 at 5:09am
post #3445 of 19511
Quote:
Originally Posted by AManAnd88Keys View Post

You might want to look that up again. "Ego" is definitely not part of the model, the last step is self-realization (activities that correspond with your individual talents and interests) - if you don't take the 1970 revision into account, where the tip of the pyramid is transcendence. Anyway, Maslows model lacks empirical evidence wink.gif the priority - just to name one thing - is not so important, you can very much focus on your self-realiziation and not give a damn about social status.
A resort to simple empiricism is a frequent one for those who wish to downplay the validity of interiors.
post #3446 of 19511
Say whaaat?!
post #3447 of 19511
Quote:
Originally Posted by AManAnd88Keys View Post
 

You might want to look that up again. "Ego" is definitely not part of the model, the last step is self-realization (activities that correspond with your individual talents and interests) - if you don't take the 1970 revision into account, where the tip of the pyramid is transcendence. Anyway, Maslows model lacks empirical evidence ;) the priority - just to name one thing - is not so important, you can very much focus on your self-realiziation and not give a damn about social status.


Indeed. Through University and in working life I am bombarded with presentations with the bloody pyramid of needs. And everyone thinks this is planted in good solid scientific research and a fact, then it turns out it's all just one man's theory that has never been confirmed in proper studies... shaking my head... ;-)

post #3448 of 19511
Quote:
 A resort to simple empiricism is a frequent one for those who wish to downplay the validity of interiors.

The Gostak distims the Doshes...............

post #3449 of 19511

But it is on the Internet!

post #3450 of 19511


Hello again Piano Man ,

 

Yes , you are correct that I'm not accurate with this , thank you for noticing and writing ,

 

I'm just pointing out Maslov !!  

 

Trying to be accurate about the Larger Concepts of the Human Condition would take years of study and work .  

 

I hope you are well ,

 

Tony

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