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New Releases 2014 - No Records Released Before 2014 - Page 8

post #106 of 143

ミユキ (Miyuki) - Signs of Future EP

https://miyuki.bandcamp.com/album/signs-of-future-ep

 

Latest name-your-price release from Miyuki aka Lera Bauer.

post #107 of 143

Misterwives- Reflections EP

 

Beautiful voice and fun tracks!

post #108 of 143

Saor: Aura

Beautiful, soaring, post-rock-inspired black metal featuring British Isles folk instrumentation (the tin whistle will leave the strongest impression) and absolutely stellar production. Typically music like this comes off a bit cheesy, but the depth of the arrangements (and the never over-powering vocals and non-metal instrumentation) and sense of place this album imparts allow it to transcend the rather D&D vibe (not necessarily a bad thing) that other similar bands inspire. Top-tier pagan black metal for certain, nipping at the heels of Drudkh, Negura Bunget, Primordial, and Winterfylleth, though vastly more accessible (imo) to the non-metal listener than those bands. Check it out on Bandcamp.

 


Spoon: They Want My Soul

Spoon have never blown my mind and they probably never will, but they are the most consistently enjoyable and just plain *good* pop/rock band of the last twenty years. Their past albums are such an integral part of me that I constantly overlook them, even as I enjoy every second of them. This album is showing every indication of joining the others in this regard.

post #109 of 143

Keep the recommendations coming guys! Here's a few more that I've really loved recently:

 

Gridlink: Longhena

This feels to grindcore what The Shape of Punk to Come feels to hardcore punk. It's that good!

 

FKA Twigs: LP1

Twigs fulfills all the promise that this new strain of depraved, atmospheric R&B spearheaded by artists like The Weeknd have been hinting at, and then some. I really think that she's more than just a flavor of the month--we'll still be listening to this for years to come. Feels almost like a spiritual sequel to Bjork's Vespertine, to me.

 

Agalloch: The Serpent and the Sphere

I think this one is being treated very unkindly by fans. It seems pretty fantastic to me, equal to the rest of their ceaselessly impressive discography. 

 

Lewis: L'Amour

Ok, technically this was supposedly released way back in 1983, albeit in extremely limited numbers, making it a practically forgotten album. But man, am I glad it's been rediscovered. 'Ahead of its time' is putting things lightly-- L'Amour blends in perfectly with other fine, recent examples of ambient pop, but nonetheless sticks out from the crowd. I mean, check out that album cover. Alpha-male handsome Lewis coupled with the cheesy art direction tell you all you need to know about this... then you put it on and your expectations are completely shattered. Lewis sounds like he's completely coked out of his mind and on the verge of a breakdown (and he's rarely intelligible), and the musical backing is all neon-tinged melancholy. It's ridiculously compelling, in spite of itself, and yes, even pretty moving.

 

Fire! Orchestra: Enter

Up until now, there have only been two albums I've listened to this year that stood even the remotest chance of dethroning To Be Kind from the top of my 2014 list: St. Vincent's self-titled and Behemoth's The Satanist. And as much as I love both, neither of them quite possessed the requisite energy, insanity, beauty, madness, challenge, and catharsis to completely do the job. I'm not saying Fire! Orchestra's latest does the job. But if anything can do it, Enter can. An absolutely astounding, mammoth effort. If avant-garde jazz is your jam, you've got to give this a listen. 


Edited by metalsonata - 8/17/14 at 11:36am
post #110 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by metalsonata View Post
 

Agalloch: The Serpent and the Sphere

I think this one is being treated very unkindly by fans. It seems pretty fantastic to me, equal to the rest of their ceaselessly impressive discography. 

I had no idea it wasn't very well received (by fans at least). I'll have to give it a few more listens to see how much longterm value it has (sadly my biggest problem with Agalloch's records is that I gradually get more and more bored with them with each listen), but based on the first couple of listens I'm almost willing to name it my favorite Agalloch record as of right now. For the time being that honor still belongs to Marrow of the Spirit.

post #111 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by TJ Elite View Post
 

I had no idea it wasn't very well received (by fans at least). I'll have to give it a few more listens to see how much longterm value it has (sadly my biggest problem with Agalloch's records is that I gradually get more and more bored with them with each listen), but based on the first couple of listens I'm almost willing to name it my favorite Agalloch record as of right now. For the time being that honor still belongs to Marrow of the Spirit.

 

Curiously enough, Marrow of the Spirit is where I began to see fans of the band expressing (occasionally vitriolic) disappointment--maybe the shift to more 'straightforward'  (not really, but I suppose compared to their first three full-lengths) black metal is what did it. At any rate, MotS was obviously a huge critical success, and while I don't think The Serpent & the Sphere has made anywhere near the same splash, it looks to me like it's shaping up to follow generally the same path as MotS--good critical attention, less than stellar fan reaction. It's not being completely dismissed out of hand or anything like that, but it is getting considerably less love than their previous full-lengths, and I find myself struggling to account for it, since it seems equivalent in quality to me. Maybe people are just getting bored of Agalloch in general?

post #112 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by metalsonata View Post
 

Curiously enough, Marrow of the Spirit is where I began to see fans of the band expressing (occasionally vitriolic) disappointment--maybe the shift to more 'straightforward'  (not really, but I suppose compared to their first three full-lengths) black metal is what did it. At any rate, MotS was obviously a huge critical success, and while I don't think The Serpent & the Sphere has made anywhere near the same splash, it looks to me like it's shaping up to follow generally the same path as MotS--good critical attention, less than stellar fan reaction. It's not being completely dismissed out of hand or anything like that, but it is getting considerably less love than their previous full-lengths, and I find myself struggling to account for it, since it seems equivalent in quality to me. Maybe people are just getting bored of Agalloch in general?

I was aware of Marrow of the Spirit not really receiving that much love from fans. Understandable, since there seemed to be a noticeable shift in style more noticeably toward black metal but also other genres as well. I personally thought MotS showed a big desire to take Agalloch's music to the next level even if the album itself may have been still slightly rough around the edges. The Serpent & the Sphere I thought was just a rock solid album altogether when I first heard it. Great sound, great writing – just altogether a thoroughly enjoyable album, and one that you wanted to press play on again once the disc was finished. Why fans aren't satisfied, I have no idea either. Perhaps people think that a great band can only have three great albums and that's it?

post #113 of 143

Tom Petty & The Heartbreakers - Hypnotic Eye

 

this is my first album of Tom Petty. It took 2-3 spins to fully appreciate it, but the more a listen to it, the more I like it. Album of the week for me.

 

 (long live the Internet!)

post #114 of 143
Ditto Hypnotic Eye is great album. Play loud!
post #115 of 143

 

We Will Reign by The Last Internationale

 

You'd expect the songs by a band with a name like The Last Internationale to touch on revolution and other political themes. What you might not expect, is the hard-rocking tight sound from this trio, that includes Rage Against The Machine drummer Brad Wilk. The music includes strands of country and folk, but never veers too far from rock. Lead singer Delia Paz passionate delivery puts love on equal footing with revolution, and lucky for us--punk trumps polemic.

post #116 of 143
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally posted by metalsonata:

 


Spoon: They Want My Soul

Spoon have never blown my mind and they probably never will, but they are the most consistently enjoyable and just plain *good* pop/rock band of the last twenty years. Their past albums are such an integral part of me that I constantly overlook them, even as I enjoy every second of them. This album is showing every indication of joining the others in this regard.

 

IMHO, the best thing that Spoon ever recorded is the "Soft Effects" EP from 1997. If by any chance you haven't heard that, you should seek it out.

 

My favorite Spoon LP is "Girls Can Tell" from 2001.


Edited by StratocasterMan - 8/23/14 at 1:45am
post #117 of 143


Pallbearer: Foundations of Burden

When was the last time you saw a metal band become so quickly canonized?

post #118 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by metalsonata View Post




Pallbearer: Foundations of Burden
When was the last time you saw a metal band become so quickly canonized?
pallbearer canonized? Why? they are just another watered down, cookie cutter doom band that seem to be popping up everywhere. Nothing original.

Monolord, Electric Citizen, Windhand, Curse The Son...the list goes on and on. All pretty dull in my opinion. Nothing fresh or original. Same chord changes and riffs over and over.
Edited by bassboysam - 8/26/14 at 8:03pm
post #119 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by bassboysam View Post


pallbearer canonized? Why? they are just another watered down, cookie cutter doom band that seem to be popping up everywhere. Nothing original.

Monolord, Electric Citizen, Windhand, Curse The Son...the list goes on and on. All pretty dull in my opinion. Nothing fresh or original. Same chord changes and riffs over and over.

 

Pallbearer has had massive cross-over appeal and has received pretty stellar reviews across the board from popular publications. I'm not saying cross-over appeal and stellar reviews make something good, but in the mainstream perception, Sorrow and Extinction is already something of a classic, and Foundations of Burden appears to be headed down the same road. And I'm all for cross-over appeal--it allows good/great bands (past examples from metal would be Sunn O))), Mastodon, and Wolves in the Throne Room) exposure to a wider audience, who then usually start exploring the genre further. Is Pallbearer as good as bands like Sleep, Electric Wizard, Candlemass, etc.? Nah, probably not. But as gateway drugs go, I think they're damn good, and pleasurable to listen to in their own right. Plus, I've got the GF listening to Electric Wizard's Dopethrone like one obsessed, and it wouldn't have happened without Sorrow and Extinction. (Seeing Pallbearer live helped, too.) You don't have to like them, but if Pallbearer is the sort of band that gets people who otherwise wouldn't listening to doom metal, then I'm pretty ok with that.

post #120 of 143
Thread Starter 

 

Interpol - El Pintor (2014)

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