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Scotch - Page 5

post #61 of 630
Thread Starter 
19lexicon78 is right, every one will have their own preference about how much water is appropriate, and of course every whisky is different. I usually start out with no water at all, nose it a bit and try a sip at full strength. Then I add a bit of water (about 10 to 20 drops), and try a bit more. Then 10 more drops, and try it again. I repeat this until I hit the sweet spot, where the alcohol sting is lessened, but the whisky has not become too diluted for my taste. I just know through time and experimentation that 1 part water to 3 parts scotch is about right for my preferences. But we are all different, so try different ammounts of water and see which way you like it best.

Btw, thanks for the props everybody, I'm glad it's turning out to be a useful post.
post #62 of 630
Definitely a very use post, many of the mentioned vintages listed here I have yet to try. It good to have some sort of guide to help you in your decision making as single malts aren't cheap and it would be painful after dropping a significant amount of cash on a bottle only to find out that it wasn't what you were looking for.
post #63 of 630
it's a usefull thread, i haven't tasted all those whisky's which Tyson described..i am/was always curious about the springbank..and the Clynelish 24 years

it's also usefull to read some books about it..i think michael jacksons whisky compagnion is a good one..but there are many more books about whisky, and each writer has got his own preference..

after reading some of those books; on one thing i agree, start with higland whisky, perhaps later the islay whisky and at last the 25 years and older whisky...the older ones are difficult to taste..you need experience )) to taste all those layers..
it's not a good thing buying eg a 25 year macallan as your first whisky...actually my first malt whisky was a 18 macallan..that was a stupid mistake..for 2 years i drank every day one glass whisky..bought for months every week another bottle just to have my collection growing and finding new tastes..after 25-30 different bottles..i had enough..it was becoming too expensive..and i needed a new hobby....audio-equipment...also an expensive one
post #64 of 630
Well, I was doing a good job of ignoring this thread and then one of my bozo colleagues went and gave me a bottle of Glenlivet 12 as a gift. I've had one Scotch in my whole life--it was with a lot of water and very peaty and smoky and very tasty.

And now I see that Tyson says the Glenlivet blows. Well, I could continue to ignore this or pick up a bottle of Laphroaig 10 at TJ's (under $30!) and compare for myself.....

Damn you, Head-Fi!

So Tyson, how many do I have to put away before Tintner's Bruckner sounds better than Klemperer's?
post #65 of 630
Well, if you ask me, free liquor has its own special appeal

Seriously, I would keep the Glenlivet and try it first. When you know how it tastes, you can use Tyson's excellent notes to find something you think suits you because by then you know if you want something milder or stronger than the Glenlivet and roughly how much peatiness you're able to tolerate. Laphroiag is a great whisky but it is definately not something everybody likes - at least not the first time.


/U.


PS: Oh, and when you have 5+ bottles of your own that you enjoy, the last 3/4 of the Glenlivet will do nicely for cooking or for any guests of the house who think that "Single Malt" is great whatever it is
post #66 of 630
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tyson
Actually, whisky can and does go bad after it's opened due to oxidation. The only way to try to avoid this is (as you drink more and more), to put it in to smaller and smaller bottles, so that there is little to no extra air in the bottle. That's too much trouble for me, and I generally go through bottles pretty quickly. My personal rule is that once a bottle gets to about 2/3 empty, I start really focusing on drinking it down the rest of the way as quickly as possible. Usually works pretty well.
Here's another interesting problem with opened bottles, according to a hangover webpage I was reading (don't ask!): Ethanol oxidizes into acetaldehyde, which is a principal cause of hangover sickness. In other words, if you drink sufficiently old booze, you don't even have to wait for your body to produce acetaldehyde overnight -- you can have that hangover right away! How's THAT for convenience?
post #67 of 630
actually i like the glenlivet 12 years..it has got much fruit in it, it makes me smile, especially with a glass of 3-4..and for 23 euro...it's the best in it's category..
i use this whisky before i go out on a saturdaynight..getting drunk with some whisky is better than beer and wine..
post #68 of 630
Thread Starter 
Added Mortlach 13 Signatory 1989 and Tormore 12.
post #69 of 630

Dalwhynnie 15??

This is on sale at my neighborhood Trader Joe's.....
post #70 of 630
Thread Starter 
Dalwhinie is excellent stuff. A bit lighter than most highland malts, but a great lighter scotch, really perfect for the summer months.
post #71 of 630
Thread Starter 
Added Glenfiddich 15 Solera Reserve.
post #72 of 630
Taking the advice of some of you guys, I got a cute little sampler: 4 x 50 ml. bottles of different Glenmorangie's. The cool thing about it is that it came with a real nosing glass.

Of course, it is cheaply made (the whole deal was $20), but it is the correct shape and size. It also has a little, fitted glass lid. This way you can give it a good swooshing without spilling and the fumes get really concentrated. When you take off the lid, the extra nose is very noticeable. Recommended!
post #73 of 630
Descartes - where did you find such?
post #74 of 630
Quote:
Originally Posted by KYTGuy
Descartes - where did you find such?
Just at the big liquor store in the local mall: "Booze-n-Go" or something like that.
post #75 of 630
Thread Starter 
Added Deanston 17, an update to Glenlivet 18, and another set of good glasses.

daycart1,
Glenmorangie is one of my favorite distilleries, that was a good buy! Their scotch is gentler than most, but don't let that fool you, there is some great complexity and flavor in their various bottlings. Really curious to hear your impressions.
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