New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Scotch - Page 33

post #481 of 630
Try McKillops, 30 year old. I get some on my connection through London every time I come home. Very smooth, it goes right down served at a cool room temp, if you get it in the UK, it's about $150, if you get it in the US, it can be 3 to 4 times as high.
post #482 of 630
Quote:
Originally Posted by splaz View Post
Laphroaig 10
Glenmorangie 10

So are either of those a good choice for a beginner not wanting to splash out and just getting into single malts ?

The 'fiddich can be a reference point I guess.

Also in regard to the 3rd one I spoke of, it seems that the Macallan 12 is only available in the "Fine Oak" version here. Now on reading it your impressions are of the sherry oak one I'm gathering ? Has anyone compared them ?

From what I've read, the "Fine Oak" is aged in both sherry and bourbon barrels.
I usually get the Glenmorangie 10 in restaurants for its reasonable price. This is VERY good stuff--I'm coming to appreciate it more than a lot of expensive Scotches.
The Laphroaig is a classic, but NOT an introduction for beginners. The peat, smoke, and even iodine flavors are very strong.

The Macallan Fine Oak series is still very much recognizable Macallan.
post #483 of 630
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by splaz View Post
Well that's a bit of a relief, on rereading what Tyson thought and some other reviews I've looked at most people describe it as boring or uninteresting and while not horrible, nothing out of the ordinary either.

Just I could've sworn there were a few remarks here and there that made it sounds as if it was repulsive.

Anyway on to other matters, buying better scotch.

In fitting in with my budget, recomendations here and what's easily available I have narrowed down 2 and possibly a 3rd.

Laphroaig 10
Glenmorangie 10

So are either of those a good choice for a beginner not wanting to splash out and just getting into single malts ?

The 'fiddich can be a reference point I guess.

Also in regard to the 3rd one I spoke of, it seems that the Macallan 12 is only available in the "Fine Oak" version here. Now on reading it your impressions are of the sherry oak one I'm gathering ? Has anyone compared them ?

From what I've read, the "Fine Oak" is aged in both sherry and bourbon barrels.
Yes, I've had most of the fine oak range from Macallan, not too bad, but not as good as the sherry only aged stuff. You are better off with the Glenmorangie, which is more complex, subtle, better tasting, and cheaper.

Glenmorangie and Laphroaig are good bottles to taste/compare against each other, as each one is a really good representation of 2 extremes available in scotch.
post #484 of 630
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by daycart1 View Post
I usually get the Glenmorangie 10 in restaurants for its reasonable price. This is VERY good stuff--I'm coming to appreciate it more than a lot of expensive Scotches.
The Laphroaig is a classic, but NOT an introduction for beginners. The peat, smoke, and even iodine flavors are very strong.

The Macallan Fine Oak series is still very much recognizable Macallan.
Actually, I've had contrary experience, I've seen several people that didn't really like scotch all that much until they had a laphroaig, ardbeg, or lagavulin. This tends to be especially true of people who like expensive tequila, for some reason...
post #485 of 630

Johnnie Walker Green Label

I've been working on a bottle of the Green Label recently. This is a really good "pure malt"-- a blend, or vatting of a number of single malts--no grain whiskey.

They have changed the packaging on this and now show what is in it--at least the four most interesting ingredients: Talisker, Linkwood, Cragganmore, and Caol Ila, all at least 15 years old. The Talisker gives it a long peppery finish, the LInkwood and Cragganmore are both flowery but sweet and dry respectively. The Caol Ila is a lightly peated Islay.

The result is, as you'd expect, very balanced. An initial smoky burst is followed by some intensely sweet malt. That is followed by a minty aftertaste leading to the peppery Talisker finish. Really fine stuff at about $50.
post #486 of 630
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tyson View Post
Actually, I've had contrary experience, I've seen several people that didn't really like scotch all that much until they had a laphroaig, ardbeg, or lagavulin.
That must be me you're talking about. Hated scotch until a dear friend of mine introduced me to the wonders of Islay. Scotch without peat does nothing for me. 16 YO Lagavulin is my favorite so far.
post #487 of 630
Quote:
Originally Posted by daycart1 View Post
I've been working on a bottle of the Green Label recently. This is a really good "pure malt"-- a blend, or vatting of a number of single malts--no grain whiskey.

They have changed the packaging on this and now show what is in it--at least the four most interesting ingredients: Talisker, Linkwood, Cragganmore, and Caol Ila, all at least 15 years old. The Talisker gives it a long peppery finish, the LInkwood and Cragganmore are both flowery but sweet and dry respectively. The Caol Ila is a lightly peated Islay.

The result is, as you'd expect, very balanced. An initial smoky burst is followed by some intensely sweet malt. That is followed by a minty aftertaste leading to the peppery Talisker finish. Really fine stuff at about $50.
I've been REALLY curious about trying the Green, and your post finally drove me over the edge to go grab a bottle tonight. It's quite different compared to either the Black or the Blue that I've tried. The first sniff of it coincides with its taste...this is a pretty aggressive smelling and tasting scotch. Has a lot of bite initially with a big smoky burst as you say, followed by what to me is a pretty bitter taste that lasts through the aftertaste. Definitely not for the faint of heart IMO.
post #488 of 630
That's interesting, Vertigo. Despite the Islay/Island component, I'd characterize the Green as smooth and sweet overall!

It is interesting how much even expert taste varies. The Jim Murray "Whiskey Bible" gives the Green a score over 90, while the "Malt Maniacs" rating system has it (and the JW Blue) below 80. But then the Murray book has some cheapo supermarket whiskeys well over 90 and some ultra single malts below 80.
It is the same story when comparing the Murray with the Michael Jackson rating book.
post #489 of 630
Whenever I pass through London on the way home, I buy this:




Mackillops Choice Glen Albyn Distillery 1965 37 year old Sherry Wood Single Malt Scotch, 750ml

"MACKILLOP’S CHOICE"

The distillation of whisky in Scotland has been documented since 1494, but the industry as we know it today really started after the Excise Act of 1823. Between 1823 and 1825 the number of legal distilleries rose from 125 to 329. However, a significant number of these closed within a few years. Over the last 30 years about 40 distilleries have either been closed or demolished and currently there are just over 90 distilleries still operational in Scotland. Recently, there has been a considerable growth in consumer interest in Single Malt Scotch Whiskies and a number of distilleries now market themselves as brands.

A more recent development has been the growth of Independent Bottlers bottling single casks of Malt Whisky. A distillery bottling is produced by vatting together a great number of casks prior to bottling. As there can be a large difference between the quality of whiskies in individual casks this is necessary in order to ensure a consistent product, which is of paramount importance to the distillery's brand. For me, however, I am looking for the casks which contain only the very best whisky. One of the enchanting mysteries of Malt Scotch Whisky is that even though individual casks of whisky are distilled on the same day and at the same distillery the whiskies' flavours and tastes, after maturation, may differ widely.

So the secret of bottling excellent quality whiskies lies in the selection process. The joy of bottling a single cask is that one can choose a whisky that has matured very well and will then have unique characteristics which cannot be repeated.

All casks to be bottled as "Mackillop's Choice" have been selected by myself, Lorne Mackillop, after careful tasting. I am a Master of Wine and I use my extensive training and experience in the art of tasting to choose only those casks that have matured with an excellent balance of flavours. These flavours are derived from the original spirit having been tempered by many years in an oak cask. No cask is selected without a sample being taken and tasted, and I reject approximately 80% of the cask samples that I taste as not being of a high enough quality to bear the label of "Mackillop's Choice".

Within the "Mackillop's Choice" range are whiskies from 12 to 38 years of age, from distilleries across the various regions of Scotland. These include a number from distilleries that are now closed down or even demolished, thus making these whiskies rarer still. I have also selected various types of casks such as Bourbon, Sherry and Madeira woods.

My Single Cask Malt Scotch Whiskies would appeal to the connoisseur who wants to taste unique and individual whiskies. Due to each cask's distinctiveness once the cask has been bottled it cannot be replaced. Also, whiskies from distilleries that are no longer producing are especially demanded by collectors due to there being only a finite and dwindling availability.

"Mackillop's Choice" individual cask malt scotch whiskies can be bottled at 43% alcohol, but more predominantly at their natural cask strength, without chill-filtering and without the addition of any caramel colouring, which helps preserve the malts' natural characteristics of aroma and taste.


It is totally worth it, and much more expensive in the United States.
post #490 of 630
That Mackillop's sure sounds delicious. I wish I could find some around here.
post #491 of 630
Well I like Oban. Some friends claim that it is Scotch with training wheels, but what do they know. No, I don't like Bose speakers either.
post #492 of 630
i'm no smoker, but i love the taste of talisker. i love a scotch that'll put hair on your balls.
post #493 of 630
LOL, I guess I'm not the only one whom this thread influenced into getting a bottle of Johnnie Walker Green Label. It's pretty good. I tend to like very smoky Islay single malts, and I think the Caol Ila in this provides just enough to satisfy.

I think I'll pour myself a dram of Caol Ila next
post #494 of 630

Glenfarclas 12

Picked up a couple of new bottles at the local "ABC" because a Scotch-loving friend was in town. The selection is somewhat limited--this time I went with the Glenfarclas 12 and the Macallan "fine oak" 15 (more on that later).

The Glenfarclas comes in a nice tin can (not cardboard) that my wife took over for daffodil display. It is also pretty inexpensive as single malts go (around $35 at the state control store).

The nose is heavy on the sherry. This is also in the initial taste, but there is also good malt there. The most distinctive thing is the finish which is very long with interesting spice and even some distant peat. This is the most finish I have experenced except for my favorite Springbank.

I'm not picking up the strange taste that turned Tyson off to this one....
post #495 of 630
on the west coast, some people swear by the trader joe's selection for surprisingly good deals on single malts. I picked up some very reasonably priced genuine bowmore18, macallan11, dalwhinnie15, and lismore that way. but I am hankering for ardbeg and springbank...
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home