Head-Fi.org › Forums › Equipment Forums › Portable Headphones, Earphones and In-Ear Monitors › High-end earphones for basshead :)
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

High-end earphones for basshead :)

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 

Hey I'm looking for Good earphones that would have great bass and are good overall, with bass being priority for them. 

I currentyl have Ultrasone pro 900 headphones, so I'm looking for earphones that are similar.

Also preferably, if they won't come out every time i would shake my head, because i would mostly use them while running/jogging/cycling.

Also was thinking about some nice design, but i know that it rarely goes on a par with good sound :P.

Price range~300-400$ max

Gear mentioned in this thread:

post #2 of 20

Try looking at the Westone 3, or maybe the newer Westone Series Line. They are durable...IEMs that sound good as well as being durable are uncommon. 

post #3 of 20

They're much cheaper than your budget, but the Hisoundaudio Wooduo 2s are pretty renowned for their basshead performance. 

 

 

PS. I'm selling mine if you're interested.

post #4 of 20

The Audio-Technica CKS1000 are worth considering, though they do stick out quite far.

post #5 of 20
Oh dear yes...wooduo2 is a much better iem choice than anything so far...I should know! Cks1000 won't satisfy his needs if he likes the 900.
post #6 of 20
Thread Starter 

Oh nice i think i will consider those wooduo2.

What about companies like Bose, B&O, Harman Kardon, AKG? I've seen they make some nice looking earphones. Is the sound and bass quality bad there?

post #7 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by pokepim View Post
 

Oh nice i think i will consider those wooduo2.

What about companies like Bose, B&O, Harman Kardon, AKG? I've seen they make some nice looking earphones. Is the sound and bass quality bad there?

2 things:

 

1. If you're interested about the WD2, PM me as I'm selling mine.

 

2. Look up the headphone comparison threads in the equipment forums. That's a rather large question to ask. 

post #8 of 20
Thread Starter 

Well I think Ill get the new ones and well we live a bit far from each other so shipping would cost quite a bit.

I think i will have to try those and the other "good looking" earphones :)

post #9 of 20
Thread Starter 

Ok well, i think I will go for one of those:

Harman Kardon AE

AKG K 376

B&O beoplay H3

 

The problem is that, while beoplay H3 looks best it is twice as expensive as the other two. 

I've read that Harman Kardon has nice bass. What do you think? Is it worth getting one of those? Is B&O worth its high price? Or better stick with one of those cheaper earphones?

post #10 of 20

Definitely look at JVC FX700 or ie8/80, both are very good, I like the FX700 more sq wise but the ie series have removable cables. The FX700`s have clearer mids than the ie8`s due to the bass being less bloated, the FX700`s are a tad faster too, ie8`s have slightly better soundstage, both are airy and non fatiguing, the FX700`s have more pronounced highs but as such are a tad more fatiguing than the ie8`s. Neither are microphonic but the ie8`s are maybe more comfortable as they are lighter and thinner, if possible (or in budget) get the FX800`s, they have better mids than the FX700`s and a much improved cable, whereas I would hesitate between the ie8`s and FX700`s, I would take the FX800`s without a second thought. You can also have a look at klipsch x10`s if you like to use earphones on the go, they are cheap, maybe around $110 new, are the most comfortable iem i`ve ever tried and will probably ever try, plus they isolate amazingly.

post #11 of 20
Funny think about bass is that the audiophiles don't care about it. So the best bass IEMs, aka earbuds, cost generally less than $150. You have no reason to listen to me over anyone else but I promise you this is the list:

Hippo VB, HiSound WooDuo 2, Sony XB90EX.
post #12 of 20
Personally I went for the Denon C300 and XB90ex. I haven't heard them, so I can't recommend either, but going from reviews, they seem interesting.
post #13 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by AtariPrime View Post

Funny think about bass is that the audiophiles don't care about it. So the best bass IEMs, aka earbuds, cost generally less than $150. You have no reason to listen to me over anyone else but I promise you this is the list:

Hippo VB, HiSound WooDuo 2, Sony XB90EX.

Bass is a movement of air, wouldn`t an iem with a proper seal deliver better bass?. this is why dynamics often have better or more bass than ba iem`s because a dynamic driver with a diaphram can move more air, thus technically an inner ear, sealing iem with a dynamic driver and rear vent would produce the best bass, audiophiles do care immensely about bass otherwise product such as the ie8 would not exist.

post #14 of 20

Technically, all sound is a movement of air.  As a result, you are correct, bass does require it as well, and more of it. 

 

Audiophiles, do like bass, but they do not tend to want it to be less prominent.  They go for a 'flat' sound under the argument that it is the way the artist intended.  The problem is that this isn't the way that the songs were often intended to be listened to, so the desire for a flat sound doesn't make any sense to me.  Music on CDs, .wav files, .mp3 files, etc. is often designed to play well across a wide variety of speakers.  An artist can never really know what kind of speakers, or how many speaks you will use, nor what amplifier, receiver, etc. so they have to create a middle of the road 'flat' CD that doesn't place emphasis on any particular sound.  However, if you go to that same artist's concert you will likely get nothing like the mix you had on the CD, and the music is often extremely bass heavy.  This creates the impression that the artist never intended bass to be flat with all the other sounds.  In fact, music created since probably 1950 or so tends to have a strong emphasis on bass.

 

But the balanced armature sound that so many audiophiles go for can never achieve the level of bass that was intended in many songs by the very nature of how the music is recreated with a balanced armature.

 

However, all this above doesn't mean much because I for one have never felt it mattered what the artist intended.  I grew up with equalizers.  I love them.  They allow you to listen to music how you want, emphasising this and deemphasizing that.  Quite frankly what the artist wants is completely irrelevant.  All that matters is that a given listener likes what they hear. If you want treble heavy, bass heavy, or a flat sound it is all good, just don't let anyone tell you that a flat sound is more truthful or better, if you like it, listen to it your way.  Its much like wine, the experts will disdain moscatos and ice wines but praising chardonneys and merlots.  But they are no better, no more sophisticated, they are just different from each other.  And if it tastes good, drink it.

 

Getting back to your question, perhaps rhetorical: yes, a good seal is important, and by the nature of a dynamic driver design, if properly made, will always produce better bass than a balanced armature. Regarding a rear vent, there are several that have vents in general. The Hippo VB noted above has a screw on the end of it that adjusts the bass quantity by altering distance and air pressure, VB = Variable Bass.  Generally a larger millimeter driver will deliver more bass, but not guaranteed, the air chamber, the vents, the distance, the materials, they all factor in.

 

The Velodyne vPulse is highly recommended by many but I didn't like the bass or the earbud.  It was very uncomfortable and I couldn't get a good seal, a common problem with the vPulse and likely contributed to my feeling that it had a lack of bass.

post #15 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by AtariPrime View Post
 

Technically, all sound is a movement of air.  As a result, you are correct, bass does require it as well, and more of it. 

 

Audiophiles, do like bass, but they do not tend to want it to be less prominent.  They go for a 'flat' sound under the argument that it is the way the artist intended.  The problem is that this isn't the way that the songs were often intended to be listened to, so the desire for a flat sound doesn't make any sense to me.  Music on CDs, .wav files, .mp3 files, etc. is often designed to play well across a wide variety of speakers.  An artist can never really know what kind of speakers, or how many speaks you will use, nor what amplifier, receiver, etc. so they have to create a middle of the road 'flat' CD that doesn't place emphasis on any particular sound.  However, if you go to that same artist's concert you will likely get nothing like the mix you had on the CD, and the music is often extremely bass heavy.  This creates the impression that the artist never intended bass to be flat with all the other sounds.  In fact, music created since probably 1950 or so tends to have a strong emphasis on bass.

 

But the balanced armature sound that so many audiophiles go for can never achieve the level of bass that was intended in many songs by the very nature of how the music is recreated with a balanced armature.

 

However, all this above doesn't mean much because I for one have never felt it mattered what the artist intended.  I grew up with equalizers.  I love them.  They allow you to listen to music how you want, emphasising this and deemphasizing that.  Quite frankly what the artist wants is completely irrelevant.  All that matters is that a given listener likes what they hear. If you want treble heavy, bass heavy, or a flat sound it is all good, just don't let anyone tell you that a flat sound is more truthful or better, if you like it, listen to it your way.  Its much like wine, the experts will disdain moscatos and ice wines but praising chardonneys and merlots.  But they are no better, no more sophisticated, they are just different from each other.  And if it tastes good, drink it.

 

Getting back to your question, perhaps rhetorical: yes, a good seal is important, and by the nature of a dynamic driver design, if properly made, will always produce better bass than a balanced armature. Regarding a rear vent, there are several that have vents in general. The Hippo VB noted above has a screw on the end of it that adjusts the bass quantity by altering distance and air pressure, VB = Variable Bass.  Generally a larger millimeter driver will deliver more bass, but not guaranteed, the air chamber, the vents, the distance, the materials, they all factor in.

 

The Velodyne vPulse is highly recommended by many but I didn't like the bass or the earbud.  It was very uncomfortable and I couldn't get a good seal, a common problem with the vPulse and likely contributed to my feeling that it had a lack of bass.

I think it was a good write-up. I agree that you should always gun for whatever you find is better suited to your sonic preferences. I'd also like to add that not all "bassheads" enjoy the same kind of bass all the time. This confusion is rather prominent and a cause for a lot of misunderstandings on internet forums. For instance, for EDM and sometimes jazz I want a punchy midbass hump to make the rhythm of the music to stand out and even be felt, while for trap and dubstep I prefer a bit looser bass (I really don't need it to be tight here) with more emphasis on the sub-bass area. I think my main point here is that it's okay to like whatever you like, and make sure you buy headphones that makes you enjoy your music, regardless the artists' intentions.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Gear mentioned in this thread:

Head-Fi.org › Forums › Equipment Forums › Portable Headphones, Earphones and In-Ear Monitors › High-end earphones for basshead :)