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XB-800 hearing loss - Page 2

post #16 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by hohohohi888 View Post

By "a while" do you mean days, weeks, or months?

Like a few days usually.
post #17 of 23

Hows your ears now? 

 

I don't think you will have permanently damaged them as you have youth on your side and ears do recover. What normally happens is every time you bombard you ears with loud noise the little hairs that pick up the vibrations inside your ear get flattened. Thats why you are partially deaf after a loud concert for e.g. Slowly these hairs pop back up over time (few days). If you keep bombarding your ears with loud noise then gradually the hairs will not all pop back up, and over time more and more stay down and thats when you will start to notice ringing etc as your brain has to fill in the gaps of the frequencies that your ears don't pick up anymore. Rest is the best medicine for ears.  

 

Treat this as a lesson learned and just be careful from now on bud. Also you can learn to appreciate music at a moderate volume. Just like you can learn to appreciate music without emphasized bass. 

post #18 of 23

Hearing loss is a combination of loudness (decibel) and how long you're exposed to it in a continuous period. Unfortunately, your hair cells in your ears that allow for hearing can die off when overexposed to loud noised over a prolonged period of time, and they don't regrow. Before you visit an audiologist and spend that money, you should get a smartphone app that measures decibels and measure approximately how loudly you were listening. Then you can cross reference with this: http://www.dangerousdecibels.org/education/information-center/decibel-exposure-time-guidelines/

post #19 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sonido View Post
 

Hearing loss is a combination of loudness (decibel) and how long you're exposed to it in a continuous period. Unfortunately, your hair cells in your ears that allow for hearing can die off when overexposed to loud noised over a prolonged period of time, and they don't regrow. Before you visit an audiologist and spend that money, you should get a smartphone app that measures decibels and measure approximately how loudly you were listening. Then you can cross reference with this: http://www.dangerousdecibels.org/education/information-center/decibel-exposure-time-guidelines/

He man, you're ruining my day. :mad:

post #20 of 23
A smartphone app won't measure correctly as the phones microphone is calibrated for the freq spectrum of the human voice.

That being said, I think OP has learned a valuable lesson, and is most likely suffering from brain burn in.
post #21 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by hohohohi888 View Post
 

Okay, so I was stupid one day and used Audacity to bassboost all my rap songs, because I loved the feel of strong bass.

I had the notion that no matter how loud the bass I played, I will be fine (I thought it was treble that causes hearing loss).

Well, I maxed the volume and listened to 1 hr of heavily bassboosted songs with the XB800.  Every day, for 1-2 weeks.

 

Now, having decided to give my un-bassboosted music a listen, I discovered that I could barely make out the bass in the songs.  What would have been a loud booming bass note sounds like a weak "thud."

 

Overall, I don't feel like my hearing on the rest of the spectrum has been damaged.  Treble and midrange hearing is fine.

 

I am quite afraid that I will never be able to enjoy rap music anymore.

 

Is this permanent?  What can I do to help my ears heal, if they are going to?

 

Thanks

 

30db bass boost + a pair of sony xtrabloated headphones? srsly wtf is wrong with ppl

 

post #22 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by wphantom View Post
 

 

30db bass boost + a pair of sony xtrabloated headphones? srsly wtf is wrong with ppl

 

Yeah I can't understand the motivation of wanting that much bass out of in-ear phones honestly. Like even if you're the biggest basshead in the world, isn't having boomy cans that vibrate on your ears like the whole point? With in ears literally all you're achieving is rattling your eardrums apart very directly. And 30 F***ING DECIBELS? It's a mystery.

post #23 of 23

I haven't seen an equalizer that provides 30 dB of bass boost. Anyone out there know of such a thing?

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