Head-Fi.org › Forums › Equipment Forums › Sound Science › "Please Stop 'Burning In' Your Earphones"
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

"Please Stop 'Burning In' Your Earphones" - Page 2  

post #16 of 164
I disagree. Some things need to loosen up to work their very best. When I played baseball i was a catcher. Did you ever try catching a ball with a brand new catchers mitt? It's not easy. You have a hard time squeezing it. car engines burn oil and extra gas before they are broken in. some things need to loosen up, they are not at their best straight out of the factory
post #17 of 164

It's been my experience that some benefit from maybe 50 -100 hours of burn-in while others sound the same after a couple hundred hours as they did oob.

 

My old K701 was one in particular I recall improving after some time.  My Beyer DT880 600 seemingly never changed.

post #18 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by rommy View Post

I disagree. Some things need to loosen up to work their very best. When I played baseball i was a catcher. Did you ever try catching a ball with a brand new catchers mitt? It's not easy. You have a hard time squeezing it. car engines burn oil and extra gas before they are broken in. some things need to loosen up, they are not at their best straight out of the factory

Disagree even with leading Shure engineers, on what grounds? And what do car engines and gloves have to do with headphones?

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by tattoou2 View Post
 

It's been my experience that some benefit from maybe 50 -100 hours of burn-in while others sound the same after a couple hundred hours as they did oob.

 

My old K701 was one in particular I recall improving after some time.  My Beyer DT880 600 seemingly never changed.

Q/K701 was measured to show like no change after over 300 hours.

 

 

Whatever you guys are hearing, it's extremely unlikely to be headphone driver break-in.


Edited by xnor - 1/6/14 at 2:04pm
post #19 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by xnor View Post
 

Q/K701 was measured to show like no change after over 300 hours.

 

 

Whatever you guys are hearing, it's extremely unlikely to be headphone driver break-in.

All well and good with measurements, but not all headphones of the same model are exactly the same.  There are slight variations.

 

I prefer my ears to be the best measure of how a headphone sounds.  

post #20 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gignac View Post
 

 

Too bad he doesn't have a walk-in freezer.  Now there's a place where he could really get in some great listening.

http://www.head-fi.org/t/633755/xba-3-xba-30-the-appreciation-thread/1095 post 1099.

 

We should buy him one ;) lol. 

post #21 of 164
Or send him to Norway.
post #22 of 164
well you just seem to know it all don't you? All I was saying that in my experience some headphones and IEMs benefit. from break in and some do not...you said in a earlier post that break in is leading towards failure all I said was some things will sound better after they have been working for a while yes baseball gloves and car engines do work better after being broken in along a new pair of shoes. ..BTW Martin Logan gives precise directions on how to break in their electostates. .
post #23 of 164

Please don't be offended, but we already have more than enough anecdotes on how burn-in supposedly improves sound. Many of those contradict each other..

 

Anecdotes just help us form hypotheses, but they're not proof of anything. There are many anecdotes containing complete nonsense actually.

Example:

Quote:
Did you guys know that smoking is healthy? I knew a person that died at age 95. This person was quite a heavy smoker for many decades.

Another person died much earlier, but never smoked and had a generally healthy lifestyle. => Smoking is healthy.

...

post #24 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by rommy View Post

I disagree. Some things need to loosen up to work their very best. When I played baseball i was a catcher. Did you ever try catching a ball with a brand new catchers mitt? It's not easy. You have a hard time squeezing it. car engines burn oil and extra gas before they are broken in. some things need to loosen up, they are not at their best straight out of the factory


None of these things are headphones... I might season a new skillet by brushing it with oil and putting it in the oven. Doesn't mean I should do the same to my headphones. 

 

... Or should I? :evil: 

post #25 of 164
you still didn't answer my question. What headphones do you own, Because you seem to be an expert on this
post #26 of 164
you believe everything you read in an article...I don't need someone else to tell me what I hear. I can tell when a diaphragm loosens up or when highs stop ringing in my ears and smooth out. ..I've had hd800s which didn't change after playing for quite some time. ..I think the higher line headphones are seasoned at the factories
Edited by rommy - 1/6/14 at 5:38pm
post #27 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by rommy View Post

you still didn't answer my question. What headphones do you own, Because you seem to be an expert on this

Because it's a complete non sequitur, that's why.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by rommy View Post

you believe everything you read in an article..

No, but I believe leading engineers from companies like Shure and competently done measurements.

 

Quote:
I don't need someone else to tell me what I hear. I can tell when a diaphragm loosens up or when highs stop ringing in my ears and smooth out. ..I've had hd800s which didn't change after playing for quite some time. ..I think the higher line headphones are seasoned at the factories

A diaphragm in a dynamic driver is supposed to be rigid. If it loosens up you will actually degrade sound quality due to uncontrolled motions.

 

But since you rather stick fingers in your ears and go *lalalalalalalaaaa* I stop responding here.

post #28 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by rommy View Post

you believe everything you read in an article...

 

I can't speak for others, but it took more than one single article to convince me that burn-in isn't all it's claimed to be.

 

Quote:
I don't need someone else to tell me what I hear. I can tell when a diaphragm loosens up or when highs stop ringing in my ears and smooth out. ..I've had hd800s which didn't change after playing for quite some time. ..I think the higher line headphones are seasoned at the factories

 

There's no shortage of personal anecdotes out there claiming that burn-in is real or false. I'm sorry, but you haven't brought anything new to the table, and the reply to your comment can only be this: you haven't proven anything.

 

From the OP's article:

Quote:
Indeed, what keeps this debate going is really the lack of quantifiable evidence debunking the advantages of burn-in. Well, no one has disproven it, say audiophiles.

 

There's little actual scientific evidence that goes either way. We each need to come to our own conclusion based on the few facts we have.

Please don't take this post (or any others in this thread) personally. In a conversation about such a debated topic, you will be contradicted, it's unavoidable.

post #29 of 164
Short and sweet. .. you haven't disproved burn in either. Have you?
and yes magnets do need to loosen up. Not the cone. enough with shure already.
Edited by rommy - 1/6/14 at 7:00pm
post #30 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by rommy View Post

I think the higher line headphones are seasoned at the factories


You're funny

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Sound Science
This thread is locked  
Head-Fi.org › Forums › Equipment Forums › Sound Science › "Please Stop 'Burning In' Your Earphones"