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Sennheiser vs V Moda (Brands)

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 

One of my friends bought a pair of V Moda Crossfade M-100s and is constantly bragging about it and showing it off to everybody he knows while I own a pair of Sennheiser HD 29s (I know I'm a newbie). He doesn't seem to think much about Sennheiser and almost all the qualities he described in his headphones were those found in open back ones. I'm trying to prove to him that Senneheiser is a superior brand, especially in high-end headphones, but everything I found on Google was just about how the Momentums compare. Thanks!

 

P. S. Sorry if this is the wrong sub-forum; I'm a newbie like I said.

post #2 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jont828 View Post
 

One of my friends bought a pair of V Moda Crossfade M-100s and is constantly bragging about it and showing it off to everybody he knows while I own a pair of Sennheiser HD 29s (I know I'm a newbie). He doesn't seem to think much about Sennheiser and almost all the qualities he described in his headphones were those found in open back ones. I'm trying to prove to him that Senneheiser is a superior brand, especially in high-end headphones, but everything I found on Google was just about how the Momentums compare. Thanks!

 

P. S. Sorry if this is the wrong sub-forum; I'm a newbie like I said.

mmm... generally speaking, this is what I think.

 

Sennheiser generally tries to steer towards a more neutral balanced sound for it's higher-end models. Sennheiser's headphone line-up goes to $1,500+ with the HD800, features a variety of different types of headphones (open/closed), different sound signatures, etc.

 

V-Moda usually has their bass-emphasizing v-shaped sound signature. They strive to offer a very well done v-shaped sound signature. V-Moda's headphone line-up only goes up to $300, only closed options and are geared for portable use. For its niche: fashionable/stylish portable closed headphones that still sound really good, V-Moda is great.

 

Mmm... I don't think it's productive to compare brands so much as individual headphones. Obviously, the 1.5k HD800 will have better sound quality than the M100s. The direct competitor that Sennheiser offers that competes with the M100 would be the Momentums Over-Ears. Against the M80, I would imagine the Amperiors. The ones you prefer would depend on what kind of sound signature you are looking for, but the sound quality for the direct competitors are generally pretty close. I would maybe give the Momentums the edge because they more neutral than the M100s, and the M100's bass can be overwhelming at times & you can definitely notice the M100s recessed-mids once you try more neutral headphones. However, the M100's sound signature works amazing for EDM & whatnot, so it's morea matter of preference IMO.

 

ps: lol, I totally know that feeling. I actually was kinda braggin & showing off my M100s when I first got em, but it actually is kinda annoying to have ppl throwing random headphones in your face. :p I have since moved to a wide variety of other headphones, and I've realized that there isn't really one clear-cut best brand. They all have very compelling products that can suit specific needs, so it really depends on what you want.


Edited by money4me247 - 12/31/13 at 5:33am
post #3 of 14

Sennheiser actually makes audiophile-quality headphones.   V-Moda,,, well, they dont.

post #4 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by vkalia View Post
 

Sennheiser actually makes audiophile-quality headphones.   V-Moda,,, well, they dont.

hahaha the M80 is considered to be pretty 'audiophile-quality' headphones over here with it's balanced, neutral sound sig.

post #5 of 14

I have the M80.  It is a nice-sounding headphone and I like it/listen to it regularly, but it is by no means an an audiophile headphone.   Not even close.   I think the HD518, at half the price, does a much better job.    

post #6 of 14

hahaha I am predicting that this thread is just going to derail into brand/headphone bashing.

 

but you are comparing a closed on-ear portable (M80) against a open over-ear full-size pair (HD518)... they are targeting different audiences for different uses & are not supposed to directly compete with each other lol.

 

The open AKG q701 currently at $200 has better sound quality against the $350 portable, closed Sennheiser Momentum over-ears, but no one would say that because of that specific comparison X company is better than Y company.

post #7 of 14
Thread Starter 
Thanks guys! But I guess to end the argument once and for all, what would be the criteria for an audiophile headphone, generally speaking?
post #8 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jont828 View Post

Thanks guys! But I guess to end the argument once and for all, what would be the criteria for an audiophile headphone, generally speaking?

Lol the term gets thrown around so much by marketing/advertising, it doesn't really mean anything. Another examples of such words often misused to hype up a pair of headphones are: studio-quality, monitoring, or reference-grade. Lots of headphones get advertised as such, but not really like that. So in the context of reading that word on the box of a pair headphones... it doesn't mean anything. Basically often used as a synonym for "hi-fidelity."

 

The "audiophile-criteria" usually is referring to how accurately the headphones produce the sound from the source. So that means a flat/balanced/neutral frequency response curve (without any coloration/bass-boost/v-shaped sound sig/recessed mids/that kind of jazz). What you hear should be the same as what the source file: a realistic, unaltered, natural portrayal of the recording. So additionally, it can include other positive sound quality attributes such as having high detail retrieval, transparency, clarity, resolution, speed, sound stage, texture... blah blah blah... 

 

The ATH-M50 are often referred to as audiophile headphones, but they actually have a v-shaped sound signature with slightly recessed mids & emphasized bass. So basically, the word seems to have become meaningless. But if you read someone here talking about audiophile sound, it should be assumed that they are talking about flat sound signature with high sound quality attributes.

 

hahaha :tongue:

post #9 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by money4me247 View Post
 

Lol the term gets thrown around so much by marketing/advertising, it doesn't really mean anything. Another examples of such words often misused to hype up a pair of headphones are: studio-quality, monitoring, or reference-grade. Lots of headphones get advertised as such, but not really like that. So in the context of reading that word on the box of a pair headphones... it doesn't mean anything. Basically often used as a synonym for "hi-fidelity."

 

The "audiophile-criteria" usually is referring to how accurately the headphones produce the sound from the source. So that means a flat/balanced/neutral frequency response curve (without any coloration/bass-boost/v-shaped sound sig/recessed mids/that kind of jazz). What you hear should be the same as what the source file: a realistic, unaltered, natural portrayal of the recording. So additionally, it can include other positive sound quality attributes such as having high detail retrieval, transparency, clarity, resolution, speed, sound stage, texture... blah blah blah... 

 

The ATH-M50 are often referred to as audiophile headphones, but they actually have a v-shaped sound signature with slightly recessed mids & emphasized bass. So basically, the word seems to have become meaningless. But if you read someone here talking about audiophile sound, it should be assumed that they are talking about flat sound signature with high sound quality attributes.

 

hahaha :tongue:

 

Actually, your first paragraph doesn't make a lot of sense, especially when you do a pretty good job of describing in the second paragraph what audiophile headphones are.     Adding "blah blah blah" at the end doesn't change anything either.

 

I will add that audiophile gear isn't necessarily about the flattest response but about most closely re-creating the sound of unamplified instruments (classical music, jazz, etc), as they provide a natural and relatively objective reference point.   Some people feel that a flat FR is the best way to achieve this, others feel that some colorations (e.g., more prominent mids, warmer highs, etc) are preferable - regardless, the goal is to reproduce the original sound as closely as possible.    

 

Now, I do agree that people use that term willy-nilly, especially here of Head-Fi, where rampant love of almost everything except Beats reigns supreme, and heaven forbid something ever get called out as being less-than-stellar in one of the many "Appreciation Threads".     That doesn't make the definition meaningless - it merely requires the reader to take all the greatgreatgreat posts with a grain of salt.

 

The V-Moda M80 are fun headphones.   They have punchy high bass and lively treble.   However, they definitely do NOT do as good a job of reproducing the timbre, tonality and body of live instruments.      They are good headphones for the price/intended usage, as are the ATH-M50s, but calling either of them audiophile-grade headphones is a joke - as I said, I own the M80s and am happy cranking some house/EDM on them, but when i am focusing on the music, they never come on.    

 

On the other hand, the humble HD518s, at $120 or so, do a much better job of making a violin sound like a violin or a trumpet sound like a trumpet.  Hell, even listening to well-recorded rock (Kinks, The Doors, Floyd), the HD518s are on a different level altogether.   Yes, you are right, one is closed-ear portable while the other is a open-ear full-size but we were talking pure sound quality.     And then once you get to the HD600/650s, you have headphones that still hold their own against megabuck headphones.    If you want to get into closed headphones, I think the Momentums are better headphones than the M80s.   

 

I actually agree that it is silly to argue about whether one brand is better than another based on specific models, esp with different sound preferences.    However, V-Moda only has 2 models with some kind of hi-fi aspirations, the M80 and M100 and neither of them is particularly hi-fi (and I am not saying that is a bad thing - I am sure a lot of people will like the M80 sound to that of the 518 or Momentums), so in this particular case, one can actually make a comparison.

 

As such, in the context of audiophile speakers - in my opinion, at least, there is no comparison between the 2 brands if it comes to accuracy of the sound, when using live, unamplified instruments/vocals as the reference.    

 

There is no reason for this to degenerate into a flame-war either.   It is ok for people to disagree and state their preferences.   If all we have are cheerleaders, then that doesn't help anyone.   


Edited by vkalia - 12/31/13 at 12:54pm
post #10 of 14
The previous posters already summarized the points well, so I won't repeat what they said. I'll just add something that I noticed while wearing my V Moda.

With the headphone on your head and cable properly plugged in, swing your head left to right and back. What do you hear when the cable grazes against your cloths? Now hold on to the cable with one hand and rub the cable with your finger, what do you hear now?

Don't tell me you are supposed to remain perfectly still when listening to music. Good music makes my body move, and hearing cable scratching against some surface is quite distracting. That's one of the differences between a good headphone company versus a company that views headphones as fashion statements. Not that V Moda headphones are bad, but it's the little things that gives you clue to the direction of the company.

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post #11 of 14

My first paragraph was just to illustrate that there are many headphones with labels on their box to proclaim them to be audiophile-grade. I mean, even the Beats packaging says this & they aren't really designed to be accurate to the source. There are lots of reviews out there as well proclaiming audiophile quality / audiophile sound / whatever... the term is over-used & mis-used too often for it to be a reliable indicator of anything lol.

 

basically, the term audiophile-quality can mean almost anything, so without further description, it's hard to say. generally, though, the common/correct definition is similar to what vkalai mentioned above - closest reproduction to source material as possible.

 

ditto to the rest of his post. I basically agree with most of his statements, even the subjective ones. 

post #12 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arctia View Post

The previous posters already summarized the points well, so I won't repeat what they said. I'll just add something that I noticed while wearing my V Moda.

With the headphone on your head and cable properly plugged in, swing your head left to right and back. What do you hear when the cable grazes against your cloths? Now hold on to the cable with one hand and rub the cable with your finger, what do you hear now?

Don't tell me you are supposed to remain perfectly still when listening to music. Good music makes my body move, and hearing cable scratching against some surface is quite distracting. That's one of the differences between a good headphone company versus a company that views headphones as fashion statements. Not that V Moda headphones are bad, but it's the little things that gives you clue to the direction of the company.

hahaha... the kelvar coated cable is supposed to be a plus as it prevents the cable from fraying, but yes, I had a similar experience as you and I would prefer normal cables. lol. 

 

imo, V-Moda does seem very focused on sound signature/quality as well though. Remember they were the ones who did the whole crowd-sourcing from head-fi to tune the M100s sound. However, I do think they can improve on the design of their headphones (eg. the cable & making XL pads standard). You really won't find another company with as great customer service on their products though.

post #13 of 14

Very true, V-Moda's customer service is exceptional.

post #14 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by money4me247 View Post
 

My first paragraph was just to illustrate that there are many headphones with labels on their box to proclaim them to be audiophile-grade. I mean, even the Beats packaging says this & they aren't really designed to be accurate to the source. There are lots of reviews out there as well proclaiming audiophile quality / audiophile sound / whatever... the term is over-used & mis-used too often for it to be a reliable indicator of anything lol.

 

No disagreements there.   It doesnt help that Head-fi is one of the least-critical audio forums I have ever encountered...  I feel like a grouch of sorts sometimes, the guy dropping a turd in the Kool-Aid punchbowl.  :)

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