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Bigger soundstage means less tight musically. - Page 3

post #31 of 66
Cheers Guys!
post #32 of 66

Welcome to Sound Science, Moose!

post #33 of 66
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Redcarmoose View Post


Ok, yes maybe it should be called something like headstage? I still like the word soundstage.

So all I'm saying is try a ton of different stuff. You don't have to buy everything, but just go to a show, or over to friends and just mix as much different equipment into your rig as you can.



Every piece of equipment you use sounds a little different. Each piece of gear reacts differently depending which combo it's in. Once you find the key combo, trading out stuff like power cords and RCA cables can at times get results for some listeners. The optimum results would be detail along with the ability to hear far back into a bigger headstage. Because of the introduction of speed due to correct equipment / cable combos, not only are you hearing more of a sonic environment / space, but it can result in being more musical.

The detail can be found by having the equipment articulate better due to system speed.


The only way your going to find these qualities is by recognizing smeared music, crappy headstage and be willing to keep trying different equipment until you find gold.


Part of this is learning your sound preference. All of us like a slightly different sound. Normally there is trade offs between cold analytical and warmth somewhere. At times it really seems like DACs will start getting super detailed but it can be at a loss of musicality and comfort. It is not only finding the speed and detail but finding the complete sound you can live with.


I see. Thanks. Sounds like a long and arduous journey. 

post #34 of 66

It's really hard to decide what your preference is. Lots of work.

post #35 of 66

yo bros! i discovered what true sound stage is today.

 

I was listening to Ellie Goulding's Anything Could Happen - Alex Metric Remix (320kbps of course =P http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VV1Aa6Rm0Co)...

 

and then at exactly 0:40 into the song, I heard this wave of sound rolling slowly in at me from about 3meters behind me...

 

I legit thought that my tablet alarm went off & triggered my speakers behind me & I totally took off my headphones to see what's up.

 

... then I realized that THIS WAS SOUNDSTAGE!!!!!! heh :D

when it sounds like the music is coming from beyond your headphones & you can pinpoint where the sound is coming from

 

it was a pretty orgasmic experience.

 

edit: at 4:15 that totaallyyy happened again & i totally turned my head to see what was causing that sound! hahaha LEGIT!


Edited by money4me247 - 12/23/13 at 1:10am
post #36 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigshot View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spyro View Post
 

That reduced decay is a real killer in IEM's trying to reproduce naturalness.

 

How is delay or decay reduced or extended with headphones or ear monitors?

 

the er4 is a special case. any sound attacks super fast and strong and then seems to collapse on itself and disappear. the lower the frequency the more obvious it is, that is probably why graphs tell us there is enough db in sub bass when most people (myself included) complain about the lack of it. I imagine it goes loud enough to be registered loud, but for such a short time that it fails to give the round rumbling low note my brains expect.

from my experience those sub bass and how long they rumble can play a big part in the feeling of a big headroom(sustaining the notes or adding reverb or bad control, anything making it go longer). I don't remember feeling "surrounded" from a tight bass light source. and in a way it's logical that my brains translate reverb into "being in a room" and juge the size of it from the given reverb. it's just one aspect of the sound but it "puts the walls in place" ^_^.

 

 

@money my first XP about sound coming from "out of the headphone" was with https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3TWJiZhg7C8   around 3.35mn someone knocks on the door. I swear to you I have been opening my door at least 10times with that song. then I changed my gear and it didn't own me like before (and later I simply changed my tastes in music).

post #37 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by Noob Meister Jr View Post


I see. Thanks. Sounds like a long and arduous journey. 




The more simple route is just go to some HeadFi meets with CDs in hand. When you think you find a system you like, spend time with it. Later make it your goal to purchase the gear.

There is a ton of cool stuff that has come out in the last 24 months, much of it priced right too.
post #38 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by Redcarmoose View Post


The more simple route is just go to some HeadFi meets with CDs in hand. When you think you find a system you like, spend time with it. Later make it your goal to purchase the gear.

There is a ton of cool stuff that has come out in the last 24 months, much of it priced right too.

You're right, personal experience is far better than rhetoric and myth, assuming one knows what to listen to. For someone coming off the stock earbud that came with their cellphone it'll be an education with misteps along the way.

post #39 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by StanD View Post

You're right, personal experience is far better than rhetoric and myth, assuming one knows what to listen to. For someone coming off the stock earbud that came with their cellphone it'll be an education with misteps along the way.



Still .....ya just go to a meet and listen to some gear. There may not even be any mishaps along the way if you find a fellow members rig you like and spend time with it.
Edited by Redcarmoose - 12/23/13 at 11:08am
post #40 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by Redcarmoose View Post


Still .....ya just go to a meet and listen to some gear. There may not even be any mishaps along the way if you find a fellow members rig you like and spend time with it.

I learned the hard way, long long ago. It's my love for music/audio that propelled me into engineering. Now I write software for the "Too Big to Fail," directly for that purpose, Risk Analysis, not so much fun but funds life and headphones.

post #41 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigshot View Post
 

 

How is delay or decay reduced or extended with headphones or ear monitors?

On IEM's it's the tuning of the drivers.  To prematurely cut off or sustain the notes

post #42 of 66

Why would anyone want to do that?

post #43 of 66

The ER4 is a bright headphone because it measures bright. You need some smooth roll-off towards treble, which Olive/Welti's research confirmed once again but even stronger. If you look at Etymotic's target curve you have to subtract about 5 dB at 3 kHz, less towards the bass.

Since the ER4 does not have any bass boost even if it would measure perfectly flat with Etymotic's compensation curve it still will be perceived as ~5 dB too bright.

 

 

As for decay: the "decay" time even in bad headphones is much shorter than in your average music listening room, especially with in-ears. With better headphones the decay is so short that nobody even wanted an equivalent room for music listening, because it would sound unnatural, dead.

post #44 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spyro View Post
 

On IEM's it's the tuning of the drivers.  To prematurely cut off or sustain the notes

So you're saying that even though a musical note is still providing an electrical signal that the IEM will cutoff or prolong the sound of that note? You are kidding us, right?

post #45 of 66

How much sustain/clip are we talking about? A millisecond? A nanosecond? A picosecond?

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