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Bigger soundstage means less tight musically. - Page 2

post #16 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by Redcarmoose View Post

With detail rendering tweaks, you can achieve greater PRaT and soundstage at the same time.


Ok, yes maybe it should be called something like headstage? I still like the word soundstage.

So all I'm saying is try a ton of different stuff. You don't have to buy everything, but just go to a show, or over to friends and just mix as much different equipment into your rig as you can.



Every piece of equipment you use sounds a little different. Each piece of gear reacts differently depending which combo it's in. Once you find the key combo, trading out stuff like power cords and RCA cables can at times get results for some listeners. The optimum results would be detail along with the ability to hear far back into a bigger headstage. Because of the introduction of speed due to correct equipment / cable combos, not only are you hearing more of a sonic environment / space, but it can result in being more musical.

The detail can be found by having the equipment articulate better due to system speed.


The only way your going to find these qualities is by recognizing smeared music, crappy headstage and be willing to keep trying different equipment until you find gold.


Part of this is learning your sound preference. All of us like a slightly different sound. Normally there is trade offs between cold analytical and warmth somewhere. At times it really seems like DACs will start getting super detailed but it can be at a loss of musicality and comfort. It is not only finding the speed and detail but finding the complete sound you can live with.
Edited by Redcarmoose - 12/22/13 at 1:59pm
post #17 of 66

Oh come on, the "everything sounds different" and cable sound nonsense has nothing to do with the thread.

 

(Nonsense because whenever people are asked to prove their superhuman hearing abilities they fail miserably.)

post #18 of 66

Soundstage is the positioning of sounds in three dimensional space. Headphones put sound straight into both ears. That is two dimensional space-- a straight line running from ear to ear.

 

Clarity, flat response, dynamics, etc... are all important aspects of sound, but they aren't related to soundstage. It's good to use terms in ways that have meaning.

post #19 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by xnor View Post
 

Oh come on, the "everything sounds different" and cable sound nonsense has nothing to do with the thread.

 

(Nonsense because whenever people are asked to prove their superhuman hearing abilities they fail miserably.)

My favorite is how power cables affect sound. That one stretches the imagination beyond snapping.

post #20 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by StanD View Post

My favorite is how power cables affect sound. That one stretches the imagination beyond snapping.

As much as these expensive 'audiophile' USB cables? smily_headphones1.gif

http://www.head-fi.org/t/681542/anyone-heard-own-usb-wireworld-starlight-starlight-7-or-starlight-usb-3-0/45#post_10090604
Edited by Ari33 - 12/22/13 at 3:53pm
post #21 of 66

OP question.    I see your logic but not necessarily.   The hyper speed of a reduced smaller soundstage would sound unrealistic and unatural.

 

My W4's have a pretty good soundstage....large but not huge, yet I would say there is plenty of speed and articulation.  Again....any more would start sounding unrealistic ala Ety.   That reduced decay is a real killer in IEM's trying to reproduce naturalness.


Edited by Spyro - 12/22/13 at 3:55pm
post #22 of 66
Quote:

Which one costs more, USB or power? I wouldn't be surprised if there's a premium cable for hearing voices from beyond, sold by Sylvia Browne.

post #23 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spyro View Post
 

That reduced decay is a real killer in IEM's trying to reproduce naturalness.

 

How is delay or decay reduced or extended with headphones or ear monitors?

post #24 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigshot View Post
 

 

How is delay or decay reduced or extended with headphones or ear monitors?

Uhh, magic?

post #25 of 66
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by StanD View Post
 

Headphones do not have electronic delay lines nor distances to introduce transit times. Perhaps in this case spacial presentation has more to do phase differences which are too small in time to be perceived by humans as time differences. We use phase differences to perceive direction, hence spacial placement.


Well I like your thinking but from my perspective I never suspected there were distances to introduce transit times; more that the "perceived" distances might give the "perception" of transit times. Through my headphones I sometimes perceive sounds to come from different distances, not just directions. Is there something wrong with me or my headphones, or is there another explanation?

post #26 of 66

Could it be your own interpretation of the sound instead of the sound itself? Could it be auditory clues created by miking techniques? Could it be reverbs or delays introduced in the mixing process?


Edited by bigshot - 12/22/13 at 8:57pm
post #27 of 66
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigshot View Post
 

Could it be your own interpretation of the sound instead of the sound itself? Could it be auditory clues created by miking techniques? Could it be reverbs or delays introduced in the mixing process?


1. yes, but that's all that matters. I only perceive my perception so the physical reality of what happens before my brain is irrelevant, except to the extent it infuences my perception. Am I the only one who prevceives this way? I don't know.

2.I'll have to look up milking techniques (or you could explain); as far as i know you can put the cups on the **** at the milking shed or you can squeeze the **** yourself.

3.No, because the perception differs depending on whether I listen with headphones that have a large soundstage or small soundstage.

post #28 of 66

1) Your own interpretation doesn't mean anything to anyone else. It only applies to you at that particular moment in that particular mood.

2) The distance from the mike to the musician can reproduce the distance cues in the room the music was recorded in.

3) See number 1 then

post #29 of 66
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigshot View Post
 

1) Your own interpretation doesn't mean anything to anyone else. It only applies to you at that particular moment in that particular mood.

2) The distance from the mike to the musician can reproduce the distance cues in the room the music was recorded in.

3) See number 1 then


1. true, if my own interpretations were truly individual, which could be true, but I doubt.

2. Lol, I read "milking" not "miking". So with respect to miking my original answer to 3 applies.

3. see number 1 ;-)


Edited by Noob Meister Jr - 12/22/13 at 9:17pm
post #30 of 66

Welcome to Sound Science.

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