Head-Fi.org › Forums › Equipment Forums › Computer Audio › The dBpoweramp / Exact Audio Copy Sound Experiment - Do you hear the difference?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

The dBpoweramp / Exact Audio Copy Sound Experiment - Do you hear the difference? - Page 3

Poll Results: Do you hear the difference between dBpoweramp and Exact Audio Copy CD rips?

 
  • 66% (8)
    I do not hear any difference at all.
  • 8% (1)
    I hear a difference! dBpoweramp sounds better to me.
  • 25% (3)
    I hear a difference! Exact Audio Copy sounds better to me.
  • 0% (0)
    I hear a difference...but I'm not sure which I prefer.
12 Total Votes  
post #31 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by A_Man_Eating_Duck View Post
 

 

i think what you should do is, rip the same track as wave on EAC and DBPoweramp and see if their checksums match, use foobars bitcompare plugin and see if they match. If they do, ripping is not causing the problem. how is you Foobar setup, using any EQ's and what is you output mode? DS, KS, ASIO, WASAPI?

 

I will look at the checksums and the bitcompare plugin and get back to you.  Output mode is DS - Speakers (Realtek High Definition Audio) - which I assume means it's just outputting through my computer's sound card/headphone jack.

post #32 of 67

I'm doing a full file checksum, if anything is different in the file the checksums will be different.

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by GrindingThud View Post

This one works better: http://www.menasoft.com/blog/?p=34
RIFFPad 0.7
Switched over to PC....this one shows all the data and metadata.

 

the source files are not the problem.

post #33 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by hogger129 View Post
 

 

I will look at the checksums and the bitcompare plugin and get back to you.  Output mode is DS - Speakers (Realtek High Definition Audio) - which I assume means it's just outputting through my computer's sound card/headphone jack.


Thanks, just remember if you are using checksums so if Foobar shows artist and album info for your wave file then there is metadata in it. Right click the file in Foobar > properties and click tools and remove tags. After that then check the checksums. If you are using the bitcompare plugin, Foobar will ignore the metadata and just check the audio data.

 

DS output it fine


Edited by A_Man_Eating_Duck - 12/28/13 at 6:38pm
post #34 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by A_Man_Eating_Duck View Post
 


Thanks, just remember if you are using checksums that if Foobar shows artist and album info for your wave file then there is metadata in it. Right click the file in Foobar > properties and click tools and remove tags. After that then check the checksums. If you are using the bitcompare plugin, Foobar will ignore the metadata and just check the audio data.

 

DS output it fine

 

What are KS, WASAPI and ASIO?  

 

Might take me a day or so.  I'm currently in the process of ripping ~300 CD's.


Edited by hogger129 - 12/28/13 at 6:43pm
post #35 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by hogger129 View Post
 

 

What are KS, WASAPI and ASIO?  

 

KS = Kernel Streaming

 

Kernel Streaming support allows bit-exact playback bypassing Windows mixer. This is used with Windows XP systems it can be used with Windows Vista and Windows 7 but not recommended. If you are using Vista or W7 then use WASAPI

 

WASAPI = Windows Audio Session API

 

Allows bit-exact output and muting all other sounds. Windows Vista SP1 or newer required.

 

ASIO = Audio Stream Input/Output

 

A computer sound card driver protocol for digital audio specified by Steinberg, providing a low-latency and high fidelity interface between a software application and a computer's sound card. Whereas Microsoft’s DirectSound is commonly used as an intermediary signal path for non-professional users, ASIO allows musicians and sound engineers to access external hardware directly. Foobar warning: Contrary to popular "audiophile" claims, there are NO benefits from using ASIO as far as music playback quality is concerned, while bugs in ASIO drivers may severely degrade the performance. There is nothing wrong with adding latency for playback, it's only bad for recording.

 

There is nothing wrong with using DS (directsound) as you output.
 

post #36 of 67
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by A_Man_Eating_Duck View Post
 

This is just getting silly, if the files are exactly the same (filecompare, checksum, etc) where is the extra information coming from?

 

The ripping program or ripping method in each program can't be faulted because it's producing exactly the same file.

 

If you want to test this properly then do a blind ABX test using the foobar component. If the differences are that noticeable then this test should take less than 5 minutes doing 10 trials. Please post your results.

 

http://www.foobar2000.org/components/view/foo_abx

 

BTW ripping in paranoid mode is bad for your drive, it will put a lot more stress on it.

That's what I would like to know! I truly have no idea why they sound so different, even when they are bit identical. I am aware of the risks of Paranoid mode. It's all part of my experiment. :wink_face:

post #37 of 67

Your logic seems flawed, you compare 2 rips with 3 different pieces of software and they all say that the files are identical so why is the ripping process at fault?

post #38 of 67
Thread Starter 

I'm not necessarily saying that the ripping process is at fault. All I know is that every time I listen to rips done with the two programs, with the same playback setup, they sound different. Trust me, I want to get to the bottom of this.

post #39 of 67

Have you tried that crude ABX on your iPod that I suggested?

 

What is your process for getting your music on to your iPod?


Edited by A_Man_Eating_Duck - 12/28/13 at 7:30pm
post #40 of 67
Thread Starter 

I'll do that soon, just to confirm for you what I already know. I can even try it on different styles of music.

 

To put the files on the iPod, I drag and drop them into iTunes, input whatever data I want, then transfer. Nothing special.


Edited by Music Alchemist - 12/28/13 at 7:33pm
post #41 of 67

Could it be something to do with sound check or a custom EQ?

 

Also would you have another set of headphones to test with?


Edited by A_Man_Eating_Duck - 12/28/13 at 7:38pm
post #42 of 67
Thread Starter 

I usually set the iPod to its Electronic EQ setting, because it's the only one that sounds good to me. With EQ off, everything sounds pretty bad. Listening to everything on the same EQ setting should mean that the EQ is not a factor, though.

 

What sound check are you referring to?

post #43 of 67

From the apple site.

 

Sound Check is a feature designed to allow you to hear all of your songs at approximately the same volume. You can turn Sound Check on and off in the Playback panel of iTunes preferences.

 

How it works

 

When Sound Check is on, iTunes scans the songs in your library and computes characteristics of their playback volume. As new songs are added, iTunes computes this information in the background. This data is stored in either the "normalization information" ID3 tag or the iTunes Music Library database. The audio data in your music files is never changed. If you encode or "rip" a song with iTunes, the sound check level is stored in the song's ID3 tags. For songs that were encoded with iTunes 1 or iTunes 2, or another application, the sound check levels are stored in the iTunes Music Library database.

 

When Sound Check is off

If you turn Sound Check off, the Sound Check data stored for each song is ignored, but not removed from the iTunes Music Library or the ID3 tags.

 

Notes

    1. Sound Check is designed to work with .mp3, .AAC, .wav, and .aiff file types. It does not work with other file types that iTunes can play.
    2. Any boosts in playback volume are designed to be protected against clipping by iTunes' build-in limiter.

post #44 of 67
Thread Starter 

Oh, that. Looks similar to ReplayGain. I use neither. (I checked again to make sure that Sound Check was turned off in both iTunes and the iPod.)


Edited by Music Alchemist - 12/28/13 at 7:49pm
post #45 of 67

could you be driving your headphones too hard?

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Computer Audio
Head-Fi.org › Forums › Equipment Forums › Computer Audio › The dBpoweramp / Exact Audio Copy Sound Experiment - Do you hear the difference?