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I think i might go ahead and buy the Sennheiser HD600 for music production. Should i do it?

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 

Should i buy it?

post #2 of 19

Yes,

But not for mixing, never mix on headphones is a golden rule of audio! 

post #3 of 19
Thread Starter 

Yeah i use headphones to check for details in a song. Are the hd600 really that good lol i've read nothing but good reviews

post #4 of 19

They're more for enjoyment than critical listening.

They're too different sounding to studio monitors to make a good complement.

 

Don't get me wrong, they're awesome headphones, but you should get something like the Beyerdynamic DT880 for that job.

post #5 of 19
Thread Starter 

Which version of the Beyerdynamic DT 880 is the best one for me as i will be using it off of my laptop?

post #6 of 19
Thread Starter 

I hear the beyerdynamic DT 880 Premium 600 OHM version is the best sounding one

post #7 of 19

if you're looking at the 600ohm you will definitely need an amp

post #8 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by GREQ View Post

They're more for enjoyment than critical listening.
They're too different sounding to studio monitors to make a good complement.

Don't get me wrong, they're awesome headphones, but you should get something like the Beyerdynamic DT880 for that job.

I happen to be in the professional classical music world and have been a part of many a recording process with labels such as Reference Recordings, Naxos, and some in house orchestral labels. I have seen first hand, studio producers and mixers using hd600.
post #9 of 19

beyerdynamic T1?  880 or 990?

post #10 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bigglesworth View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by GREQ View Post

They're more for enjoyment than critical listening.
They're too different sounding to studio monitors to make a good complement.

Don't get me wrong, they're awesome headphones, but you should get something like the Beyerdynamic DT880 for that job.

I happen to be in the professional classical music world and have been a part of many a recording process with labels such as Reference Recordings, Naxos, and some in house orchestral labels. I have seen first hand, studio producers and mixers using hd600.

Do you think they're right to be using the HD600?

Just because they use it, doesn't necessarily make it a good choice. 

If one Classical producer doesn't know any better, but tells all his producing buddies how good the HD600 is, and they all start using them, then that's a huge problem.


I'm not saying I'm right, just offering a reasonable counter-argument to a headphone that tends to be more forgiving to a recording than revealing.

The overall music presentation would be more to my taste too through an HD600, but for a pro recording, I'd want to hear any problems in the recording highlighted quickly by something like a DT880.... then once it's finished I'd enjoy it through something like and HD600.

post #11 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by GREQ View Post
 

Do you think they're right to be using the HD600?

Just because they use it, doesn't necessarily make it a good choice. 

If one Classical producer doesn't know any better, but tells all his producing buddies how good the HD600 is, and they all start using them, then that's a huge problem.


I'm not saying I'm right, just offering a reasonable counter-argument to a headphone that tends to be more forgiving to a recording than revealing.

The overall music presentation would be more to my taste too through an HD600, but for a pro recording, I'd want to hear any problems in the recording highlighted quickly by something like a DT880.... then once it's finished I'd enjoy it through something like and HD600.

I own a pair of hd580's and can attest to their sound.  While not SUPER detailed, they are quite transparent and give you very balanced overall presentation that is revealing without ever being fatiguing.  Recording engineers often have to listen for many hours (sometimes 8-12 hrs/day) and can't stand ear fatigue.  I haven't heard the Beyers, so I can't say that they wouldn't be a good choice.  But, if they are super detailed headphones, they might be a little fatiguing for multiple hour listening sessions.  I think this is why I've seen so many recording professionals using HD600/580.  These people have some serious golden ears to be in the profession....I have a feeling that they have some knowledge and intentionality in their actions rather than just doing things their told...we're talking major audiophile labels here.  

post #12 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by GREQ View Post
 

They're too different sounding to studio monitors to make a good complement.

 

Which monitors? Not all studio monitors sound the same. My HD600 wasn't too far off the KRK Rokit 6 when I got to listen to them. If anything, it was probably the earpads that made the HD600 sound a bit sharper in the treble (I just picked them up used at the time I got to listen to the KRK running off a Benchmark DAC1). If there's anything that makes them less ideal for a recording engineer, it's if he's not familiar with how much the earpads can change the sound. Keep a spare set and rotate them often.

post #13 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by ProtegeManiac View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by GREQ View Post
 

They're too different sounding to studio monitors to make a good complement.

 

Which monitors? Not all studio monitors sound the same. My HD600 wasn't too far off the KRK Rokit 6 when I got to listen to them. If anything, it was probably the earpads that made the HD600 sound a bit sharper in the treble (I just picked them up used at the time I got to listen to the KRK running off a Benchmark DAC1). If there's anything that makes them less ideal for a recording engineer, it's if he's not familiar with how much the earpads can change the sound. Keep a spare set and rotate them often.

No two studio monitors sound the same, this is true - but they all try to aim for one thing - neutrality.

The HD600 is warm and veiled. 

Maybe this is just what classical recordings need to be mastered 'correctly'. I'm all up for learning new things. That's what's so interesting about headfi - you learn new things all the time.

post #14 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by GREQ View Post
 

The HD600 is warm and veiled.

 

On old pads.

post #15 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by ProtegeManiac View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by GREQ View Post
 

The HD600 is warm and veiled.

 

On old pads.

I've only heard them on new pads in the shop - and still compared to neutral stuff like DT880 (sorry for hammering on about the same headphone - it's just an example) I still feel that's the kind of sound it presents.

 

Conversely, one who is indeed accustomed/adjusted to the HD600 would consider the DT880 a bright headphone and be put off by the comparatively forward treble presentation.

 

As a disclaimer, I do actually prefer the overall sound presentation of the HD600 over the DT880 - there is no hate for the Sennheiser here whatsoever. 

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