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On a mission to like jazz - Page 34

post #496 of 746
Quote:
Originally Posted by jasonb View Post
 

The Giant Steps album was actually still in the plastic, never opened. The other two were open, but still minty fresh without a scratch or finger smudge on them.  

Sometimes you have to wonder about folks. Why would you purchase a classic CD and then never listen to it.  Their loss is your gain.  Enjoy it!  :beerchug:

post #497 of 746
Quote:
Originally Posted by ralphp@optonline View Post
 

Only if it features lots of Monk dancing.

it does :D

post #498 of 746
Quote:
Originally Posted by Buddhahacker View Post
 

Wow! Lucky you.  Giant Steps is great. I think this was his break out album of sorts. 


I'm not sure that Giant Steps was Coltrane's "break out album", however what it was and still is is Coltrane's definitive statement for his "sheets of sound" period and one of the last recordings Coltrane made before forming his classic Quartet (Trane + McCoy Tyner + Jimmy Garrison + Elvin Jones). But that's just nerdy jazz talk. What "Giants Steps" really is is one hell of a great album.

post #499 of 746
Quote:
Originally Posted by Buddhahacker View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jasonb View Post
 

Just found these at a local flea market. All in mint condition, $20 for all 3. 

Wow! Lucky you.  Giant Steps is great. I think this was his break out album of sorts. 

Besides Mr. P.C. which is amazing, Giant Steps has never really appealed to me for whatever reason. (Actually seems Syeeda's Song Flute is on there also. That one I like too. It is in fact one of my favorite Coltrane tunes.) I might be the only person on the planet to think this, but I would pick Coltrane Jazz, another Atlantic record from around the same time, over Giant Steps any day of the week. It is in fact one of my favorite Coltrane records. A lot of people I know have never even heard it, or, heard of it.

 


 

How many petite young ladies do you know who play baritone saxophone? :D

 

 

post #500 of 746
Quote:
Originally Posted by TJ Elite View Post
 

Besides Mr. P.C. which is amazing, Giant Steps has never really appealed to me for whatever reason. (Actually seems Syeeda's Song Flute is on there also. That one I like too. It is in fact one of my favorite Coltrane tunes.) I might be the only person on the planet to think this, but I would pick Coltrane Jazz, another Atlantic record from around the same time, over Giant Steps any day of the week. It is in fact one of my favorite Coltrane records. A lot of people I know have never even heard it, or, heard of it.

 


 

How many petite young ladies do you know who play baritone saxophone? :D

 

 

I love it already. 

post #501 of 746
Quote:
Originally Posted by TJ Elite View Post
 

Besides Mr. P.C. which is amazing, Giant Steps has never really appealed to me for whatever reason. (Actually seems Syeeda's Song Flute is on there also. That one I like too. It is in fact one of my favorite Coltrane tunes.) I might be the only person on the planet to think this, but I would pick Coltrane Jazz, another Atlantic record from around the same time, over Giant Steps any day of the week. It is in fact one of my favorite Coltrane records. A lot of people I know have never even heard it, or, heard of it.

 


 

 

I hadn't heard of that album. I pinged a friend and he had it. Your right.  It's good but I didn't care for the mixing but that could due to whoever engineered the CD.

post #502 of 746

 

Genius'at work..:cool: 


Edited by Quinto - 4/28/14 at 2:52pm
post #503 of 746
Quote:
Originally Posted by Buddhahacker View Post
 

I hadn't heard of that album. I pinged a friend and he had it. Your right.  It's good but I didn't care for the mixing but that could due to whoever engineered the CD.

Besides the title track "Giant Steps" and the previously mentioned "Syeeda's Song Flute" this killer album also includes the Coltrane classics "Cousin Mary", "Naima" and "Mr. P.C."

And, what specifically about the mix is it that you don't care for? Please understand I'm not questioning your tastes but I am somewhat curious as to exactly what troubles you (about the mix, that is :blink:).

 

Quick note: I just listened to all of "Giant Steps" to refresh my memory and I just wanted to say THANK YOU!! What a great album and one truly deserving of its "classic" status.


Edited by ralphp@optonline - 4/28/14 at 3:19pm
post #504 of 746

post #505 of 746
Quote:
Originally Posted by ralphp@optonline View Post
 

Besides the title track "Giant Steps" and the previously mentioned "Syeeda's Song Flute" this killer album also includes the Coltrane classics "Cousin Mary", "Naima" and "Mr. P.C."

And, what specifically about the mix is it that you don't care for? Please understand I'm not questioning your tastes but I am somewhat curious as to exactly what troubles you (about the mix, that is :blink:).

 

Quick note: I just listened to all of "Giant Steps" to refresh my memory and I just wanted to say THANK YOU!! What a great album and one truly deserving of its "classic" status.

 

My comment was for the album Coltrane Jazz where Mr. Coltrane and his sax were in my left ear and everything else was in my right ear.  Nothing was in front of me.  Maybe this works for stereo speakers but not for headphones.  It is quite annoying. Musically, I love the album but I just wish John would would move slightly forward.  Maybe I'll try playing with the crossover in my XM6 and see if I can fix it. 

post #506 of 746
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Buddhahacker View Post
 

 

My comment was for the album Coltrane Jazz where Mr. Coltrane and his sax were in my left ear and everything else was in my right ear.  Nothing was in front of me.  Maybe this works for stereo speakers but not for headphones.  It is quite annoying. Musically, I love the album but I just wish John would would move slightly forward.  Maybe I'll try playing with the crossover in my XM6 and see if I can fix it. 

I'm assuming you mean crossfeed? If so then yes, crossfeed will help in this case. I always use crossfeed with my in ear monitors and it is much more enjoyable.

post #507 of 746
Quote:
Originally Posted by Buddhahacker View Post
 

 

My comment was for the album Coltrane Jazz where Mr. Coltrane and his sax were in my left ear and everything else was in my right ear.  Nothing was in front of me.  Maybe this works for stereo speakers but not for headphones.  It is quite annoying. Musically, I love the album but I just wish John would would move slightly forward.  Maybe I'll try playing with the crossover in my XM6 and see if I can fix it. 


Ah that explains things. I often forget when posting in the "music" section of the forum that this is a headphone forum. I basically don't consider how someone is listening to the music being discussed only that they are actually listening. Speakers, headphones, live - it makes no difference to me. Now that being said it is too bad the "Coltrane Jazz" suffers from the hard left, hard right stereo mix that was used in the early days of stereo, and 1960 is still fairly early for stereo. Can't say I listened to that album (and I do own it on LP) much, if at all, with headphones so I never really noticed or paid attention to the stereo mix.

post #508 of 746
Quote:
Originally Posted by TJ Elite View Post
 

Besides Mr. P.C. which is amazing, Giant Steps has never really appealed to me for whatever reason. (Actually seems Syeeda's Song Flute is on there also. That one I like too. It is in fact one of my favorite Coltrane tunes.) I might be the only person on the planet to think this, but I would pick Coltrane Jazz, another Atlantic record from around the same time, over Giant Steps any day of the week. It is in fact one of my favorite Coltrane records. A lot of people I know have never even heard it, or, heard of it.

 


 

How many petite young ladies do you know who play baritone saxophone? :D

 

 

Thanks for the recommendation, TJ.

I'll get one of her latest CD's. Rich, deep sound of the baritone can. What a treat !

post #509 of 746
Quote:
Originally Posted by jasonb View Post
 

I'm assuming you mean crossfeed? If so then yes, crossfeed will help in this case. I always use crossfeed with my in ear monitors and it is much more enjoyable.

You are correct jasonb.  I had crossover cables on mind when I wrote the post. 

post #510 of 746

How many here have heard of Walter Norris? Not many I assume unless you've listened to Ornette Coleman's "Something Else!!!" or are otherwise a truly avid fan of jazz. Below is a copy-paste of a post I made in the "What Are You Listening to Right Now?" thread a while ago. It contains information about the live album Norris recorded with Leszek Możdżer at the A-Trane in Berlin. Norris was an interesting but not very well-known pianist and I recommend finding out more about him if what's below manages to pique your interest.

 

Album information and song examples (Click to show)

Walter Norris & Leszek Możdżer - The Last Set: Live at the A-Trane

 

No one with a background in jazz, who ever experienced a performance of the American Walter Norris, would doubt that he saw a true master of jazz piano: Walter Norris, who was born in Little Rock in 1931, started taking classical piano lessons at the age of four. As a teenager he was so impressed by boogie-woogie pianists that he started playing jazz. After graduating from high school his first professional jobs were in a quartet of the blues musician Mose Allison and in the Jimmy Ford quartet. From 1954 to 1960 Norris was a part of the west coast jazz scene of Los Angeles and played with all famous local musicians – Stan Getz, Dexter Gordon, Johnny Griffin, Charlie Mariano, Herb Geller. In 1958 he appeared on Ornette Coleman’s legendary recording "Something Else!!!". Two years later Norris went to New York, where he worked at Hugh Heffner’s Playboy club from 1963 to 1970, first as a pianist and then as artistic director. Norris explains: "So maybe it was not a jazz club in the traditional sense of the word, but people like Oscar Peterson came in and played there. As artistic director I encouraged my musicians to accept all sort of jobs and we were then sent a replacement. So we got people like Ron Carter or Tony Williams as replacements! Monty Aexander was working there and Herbie Hancock used to drop by regularly. It was an amazing atmosphere for a pianist."

 

Norris came to Europe with the Thad Jones/Mel Lewis Orchestra in the early 70s and recorded several albums including the acclaimed LP "Drifting" with George Mraz. After a short stay in New York with Charles Mingus Quintet, he accepted a job in the Berlin SFB Radio Orchestra in 1977 and moved to Berlin permanently. He later became a professor for jazz piano at the Berlin Music University "Hochschule der Künste" and continued working as a composer and musicologist.

 

It was in Berlin where he first met Leszek Możdżer and the luminous star of Polish jazz recollects, "It was in the 80s and I was still a teenager when I listened to the music of Walter Norris for the first time at a friend’s flat in Berlin. I was fascinated by the intensity and originality of Walter’s playing from the first moment on and ten years later he came to a concert of mine at the Berlin Polish Institute. We quickly got to know each other and I was deeply impressed by his personality, openness and helpfulness."

 

Możdżer then suggested Norris and him collaborate for a couple of concerts in Berlin and Poland. They developed a concept, rehearsed together, and on November 2nd, 2008 they played live for the first time on two pianos at the Berlin jazz club A-Trane, a place where Walter was a regular musical quest. "The concert became one of these rare, great experiences for everyone involved – full of true music, deep but making everyone smile with bliss at the same time," Możdżer recalls. The concert remained their only collaboration: On the night of Octover 29, 2011, Walter Norris dies in his home in Berlin at the age of 79. After one year, almost to the day, ACT releases "Last Set – Live at the A-Trane", a recorded dialogue between the two outstanding pianists and extending the legacy of an unjustly unknown artist. As Możdżer explains, "Walter didn’t have a big career, he just played music. He was a true artist, though he often shone in the background, and it is about time someone drew attention to him". This could be achieved posthumously with this album, on which two soul mates meet. Both of them have an extraordinary depth of expression precisely because, despite their background in classical music, they know no stylistic limits.

 

On the eight long improvisations chosen my Możdżer on "The Last Set – Live at the A-Trane" the playing of the two is perfectly intertwined. On pieces dominated by the rhythm, melodically minimalistic parts ("From Another Star"), classically romantic sounding bits ("Reflective") or up-tempo pieces which build up to chromatic peaks ("Tsunami"), you can constantly hear the exchange of ideas and the abundance of emotions and ideas influenced by different musical eras and seldom heard in such a symbiotic and "classic" way.

 

"The Last Set - Live at the A-Trane" is the impressive and worthy legacy of a unique musician full of curiosity, versatility, persuasiveness, a strong attitude and technical brilliance which live on in both Możdżer’s playing as well as on this recording.

 

"The musical world is poorer without Walter." (Herb Geller)

 

"Walter Norris was a wonderful pianist. He was very serious about his art. His passing is a great loss to the music world." (George Mraz)

 

"Walter was incomparable and unmistakable in his style – you couldn't say he plays like anyone, Walter was Walter. Simply unforgotten – simply great." (Rolf Kühn)

 

 

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