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On a mission to like jazz - Page 32

post #466 of 744

Check out Antonio Sanchez "New Life" latest release.  Pretty progressive with top-notch musicianship all the way around.  I think Sanchez is the best jazz drummer among the younger generation (or current) players out there today.  He does it all....whether it's as a session player, solo projects or playing as Metheny's #1 choice drummer.  A total monster in every regard.

post #467 of 744
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spyro View Post
 

Check out Antonio Sanchez "New Life" latest release.  Pretty progressive with top-notch musicianship all the way around.  I think Sanchez is the best jazz drummer among the younger generation (or current) players out there today.  He does it all....whether it's as a session player, solo projects or playing as Metheny's #1 choice drummer.  A total monster in every regard.

I have that its great, also have migration. 

post #468 of 744
Quote:
Originally Posted by ralphp@optonline View Post


That's quite all right as long as you acknowledge that Atomic Basie is 110% jazz biggrin.gif

Basie had the most swingingest band.
Period! biggrin.gif
post #469 of 744
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris J View Post


Basie had the most swingingest band.
Period! biggrin.gif

I agree the band were great but I have not delved enough into Basie to really tell what he is about. I always loved this performance by his trombone player - Booty Wood. The bass player is also on fire. This is the kind of thing i think you need to see and hear live, a lot of the Basie records have poor recording (the ones i have heard). ¬

 

 

post #470 of 744
Basie usually had incredible drummers!
post #471 of 744
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spyro View Post

Check out Antonio Sanchez "New Life" latest release.  Pretty progressive with top-notch musicianship all the way around.  I think Sanchez is the best jazz drummer among the younger generation (or current) players out there today.  He does it all....whether it's as a session player, solo projects or playing as Metheny's #1 choice drummer.  A total monster in every regard.

Will check it out!
post #472 of 744

Jazz is not dead. It just smells funny... Frank Zappa

 

Some funny side of Frank Zappa : http://www.jazz.com/dozens/the-dozens-the-jazzy-side-of-frank-zappa

 

My favourite is Blessed Relief .

post #473 of 744

Try this one it is like an ECM version of Dark Side of the Moon,

check track 4 '' The Bird''

 

http://www.soundliaison.com/products-from-our-studio-showcase-series/110-batik-flac


Edited by christian u - 4/21/14 at 7:25am
post #474 of 744
Quote:
Originally Posted by TJ Elite View Post
 

I can't think of a "best of" jazz listing that I've seen recently that didn't feature "Conference of the Birds" so I have naturally owned it for many a year now – since my early forays into the world of jazz. I've always enjoyed it but to date have not managed to familiarize myself with any of Dave Holland's other works. "Gateway" featuring John Abercrombie, Dave Holland and Jack DeJohnette sounds interesting, but I'm not sure if I've ever seen it in stores where I live. Might have to turn to Amazon at some point. I've always found these recommendation threads interesting, because I enjoy sharing what I've discovered with others – the only thing I enjoy more is actually listening to the music – but I've never had trouble discovering new, great music on my own, so I've never had much need for these threads myself. The sense of discovery is also more satisfying if you feel you found something on your own. I discover so much new music on a daily basis, the trouble is actually finding the time to listen to all that music and not figuring out what new I could be listening to. It doesn't help that I listen to jazz, classical, metal, electronic, rock, hip hop, folk, soul… you name it.

 

Bicycling season has finally begun in earnest here in northern New Jersey and so it's taken me a little while to respond to the above quoted post since I've been busy playing outdoors :tongue: However, better late than never so here goes.

 

The "Gateway" recordings (there are 4 recordings total, all on ECM) are quite good and recommended. Dave Holland has been recording regularly since he came onto the jazz scene back in the late 1960s and therefore there are lots of recordings featuring his excellent bass playing, both as a sideman and as a leader. Among the highlights of his catalog are the recordings he made with his late 1990s/early 2000s quintet. Give this CD a listen, you will not be disappointed - first rate compositions and great playing - what's not to like?

 

Dave Holland Quintet - Prime Directive (1998)


Plus a nice live recording by this group:

post #475 of 744

 

One of my favorite Bill Evans tune..

post #476 of 744
Quote:
Review by Scott Yanow
The six-CD box set Keith Jarrett at the Blue Note fully documents three nights (six complete sets from June 3-5, 1994) by his trio with bassist Gary Peacock and drummer Jack DeJohnette. Never mind that this same group has already had ten separate releases since 1983; this box is still well worth getting. The repertoire emphasizes (but is not exclusively) standards, with such songs as "In Your Own Sweet Way," "Now's the Time," "Oleo," "Days of Wine and Roses," and "My Romance" given colorful and at times surprising explorations. Some of the selections are quite lengthy (including a 26-and-a-half-minute version of "Autumn Leaves") and Jarrett's occasional originals are quite welcome; his 28-and-a-half-minute "Desert Sun" reminds one of the pianist's fully improvised Solo Concerts of the 1970s. Throughout the three nights at the Blue Note, the interplay among the musicians is consistently outstanding. Those listeners concerned about Jarrett's tendency to "sing along" with his piano have little to fear for, other than occasional shouts and sighs, he wisely lets his piano do the talking.

                                          


Edited by christian u - 4/22/14 at 6:56am
post #477 of 744
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kheadfi View Post
 

Yes Trilok is fantastic.

 

Here is another one which is not Jazz/jazz but does fit in the Jazz category because of the way the musicians are playing. It is also one of the best sounding albums I know.

Beautiful atmosphere, lots of space, concept album, a bit of a Pink Floyd vibe to it somehow.

The Sound Stage has an almost visual quality and the music made me read the old man and the sea again, kind of  like making your own movie in your head, reading the book and hearing the music simultaneously.

 

Flac or Wav, for some reason they are selling the flac cheaper( $15) than the wav ($20), why ?

 

Flac; http://www.soundliaison.com/products-from-our-studio-showcase-series/110-batik-flac

 

Wav; http://www.soundliaison.com/products-from-our-studio-showcase-series/109-batik

 

Same Label different artist, Bruce Springsteen cover;

post #478 of 744

hmmmm........... nice

 


Edited by magiccabbage - 4/22/14 at 12:12pm
post #479 of 744

A new favorite;

 

Eliane Elias/Marc Johnson; Swept Away

 

[quote]Swept Away sees the top-class quartet of pianist Eliane Elias, double-bassist Marc Johnson, drummer Joey Baron and saxophonist Joe Lovano commune over music that is engaging and sensual, lyrical and swinging. Brazilian-born star Elias previously joined ECM veterans Baron and Lovano on Johnson s 2005 ECM album, Shades of Jade, which reaped praise far and wide. The New York Times enthused over the luminescence created by the close partnership between Elias and Johnson, while The Village Voice said the album was shimmering yet its lusciousness has all sorts of tensile strength. The same words suit Swept Away, which includes a brace of melody-rich Elias compositions, ranging from the easy-flowing title track to the smoky romanticism of Be Is for Butterfly and after-hours vibe of It s Time. Johnsons brightly grooving, Eastern-tinged When the Sun Comes Up is another highlight, and the album closes with Johnson s solo bass treatment of the old American folk song Shenandoah. Swept Away is music of depth that is disarmingly easy to love.[/quote]

post #480 of 744

I recently saw a singer for the very first time who I hadn't even heard of before.

My better half got us tickets for a duo concert with piano/vocals in the small but exquisite setting of  "Jazz at Kitano" in Manhatten.

Sara Gazarek (voc) & Josh Nelson (p)

I have never attended a Jazz concert during which the audience was so quiet that the clinging of ice cubes in the glasses was the loudest noise off stage ;-)). That really made it possible for some serious vocal artistry to develop during this set. Awesome experience. Check her out.

I'd say somewhere between Stacy Kent and Norah Jones - with obviously better technique.

 

http://saragazarek.com/home/

 

 

 


Edited by icebear - 4/23/14 at 11:56am
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