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On a mission to like jazz - Page 31

post #451 of 752
Quote:
Originally Posted by ralphp@optonline View Post
 

I completely understand your point however in the digital age one can simply make a playlist and listen to just the original album's tracks, the outtakes or the whole enchilada.

 

By the way, avant-garde/free jazz is perhaps my favorite jazz sub-genre but I tend not to recommend too many free jazz recordings since often when I do recommend a free jazz recording the responses tend to be along the lines "what is this noise" and then a once lively thread just dies:confused_face_2:. But for you I will make an exception but please forgive me if you know this one already.

 

The Dave Holland Quartet - Conference of the Birds

I do all my proper listening on my speaker system either using an SACD player or turntable. For me listening to an album should consist of pressing play or lowering the needle and sitting down, closing my eyes and listening – standing up to only switch sides on the LP or possibly discs in case of a multi-disc album. I'm an engineer, but actually programming a CD player is something I've never managed to figure out on any brand of CD player without a manual, and even if I could figure it out that's way too much hassle for me. When I listen to music I don't want to have to think about anything else. I don't want to think, period.

 

A lot of my more casual listening does happen on a laptop with headphones. Creating smart playlists in iTunes using tags and whatnot? I'm down with that, not that I have much use for the playlist I have all that often. Creating a playlist just for a single album to leave out the bonus tracks? Again way too much hassle for me. It seems pointless to begin with and I'd just immediately delete it afterwards. I dislike things that are utterly redundant. But we all have out preferences. For me the convenience of digital files makes it too easy and tempting to abandon an album midway and not give it your full attention. Even with CD you have to actually pick the album from your shelf, insert it into your player and press play. On a computer a different album would be just a click away if you find your mind wandering even for a second. Too many people nowadays don't really listen to music and give it their full attention, and that's a shame. A record playing in the background is for me a waste of good music.

 

 

I don't think of genres when I listen to music. Music is just music, and I certainly hope the musicians weren't thinking of genres when they were making the music. Genres are useful for categorizing and can make it easier to discuss music with other people, but other than that I quite hate the fact that "genres" exist. In too many genres some people seem to have strong notions about what is music "A" and what you can and can't do if you're an "A" artists. Whenever an artist who's previously been known to make music belonging in genre "A" ventures outside the typical boundaries of said genre, there's typically always some sort of counteraction to that within the fan base. I personally don't think the artists should pay much heed to that, but some people do feel insecure about alienating their supporters. One might assume that this does not apply to jazz, but it is perfectly possible for a group to go into a studio, start recording, and begin to wonder after a while "Is this jazz?" I don't think they should think about the answer to that question and just continue doing what they were doing unless they think it felt uninspired and not satisfactory. That's why I love labels like ACT for example where artists are encouraged to seek whichever musical direction they choose even if it doesn't fall under the classification of "jazz", whatever that even is. Their motto "In the spirit of jazz" fits them perfectly: As long as the spirit of jazz is there, one can release just about anything on a "jazz label" and not need to feel any reservations about it. They have my blessing to do so at least.

 

Anyway, from that tangent, I see no reason to refrain from recommending recordings simply because they are challenging for the listener, or outside some people's comfort zones. If someone does not have an open mind about things, that is only their own shortcoming. Presenting one form of music as superior or inferior to something else is very ignorant however. As someone who has been listening to quite a lot of drone and actual noise lately (I really liked Lou Reed's Metal Machine Music for example), I now find it almost funny that someone would call free jazz noise, but I of course understand quite well why it can appear that way. I've heard people who immensely enjoy Coltrane's Olatunji Concert refer to it as a proto-noise record, partially no doubt due to its truly horrid recording quality, which for me is part of the appeal. But even if it was a pristine recording, the music itself would still drive away most of the world's populace. Some people loathe the genre, and not necessarily completely without justification, for there are many records out there that are being passed off as free jazz but contain practically no musical value whatsoever. On the other hand there are also a lot of free jazz records that contain some of the most magnificent and divine music ever committed to tape. The gap between the two can sometimes be surprisingly small, but that small difference makes all the difference. The line between the two can be as fine as the one between genius and insanity.

 

I can't think of a "best of" jazz listing that I've seen recently that didn't feature "Conference of the Birds" so I have naturally owned it for many a year now – since my early forays into the world of jazz. I've always enjoyed it but to date have not managed to familiarize myself with any of Dave Holland's other works. "Gateway" featuring John Abercrombie, Dave Holland and Jack DeJohnette sounds interesting, but I'm not sure if I've ever seen it in stores where I live. Might have to turn to Amazon at some point. I've always found these recommendation threads interesting, because I enjoy sharing what I've discovered with others – the only thing I enjoy more is actually listening to the music – but I've never had trouble discovering new, great music on my own, so I've never had much need for these threads myself. The sense of discovery is also more satisfying if you feel you found something on your own. I discover so much new music on a daily basis, the trouble is actually finding the time to listen to all that music and not figuring out what new I could be listening to. It doesn't help that I listen to jazz, classical, metal, electronic, rock, hip hop, folk, soul… you name it.

 


 

I discovered this little gem late last night while browsing YouTube. Oh how I would love to hear these two live. I saw Iiro Rantala, Lars Danielsson and Cæcilie Norby a couple of weeks ago but that was in a big band context, which has never really been my thing. Still, all three were phenomenal, especially Danielsson and Norby during the couple of duets they did. I assume most people went there to see Iiro, so I really think the Swede and Dane blew most people by surprise.

 

 

post #452 of 752
Quote:
Originally Posted by TJ Elite View Post

 

very interesting post. I looked at your fav 100 albums list today and was surprised to find AC/DC in there. I have only heard of 2 artists from your top ten - Art Blakey and AC/DC. Avro part seems very interesting so i will give him a go. 

 

 

Do you like any of the Cecile Mclorin Salvant posts? Or maybe she isn't your cup of tea? Her track "what a little moonlight can do" is amazing! 

 

I also mentioned to you the group that Ralph turned me onto (the Claudia Quintet) before. I think at time time you weren't to impressed by the tracks that you heard, the problem there was that i could not find any songs from the albums that i liked on youtube for you to hear, but the 1st song from the album - "what is the beautiful" called  -  "showtime - 23rd street runs into heaven" is truly brilliant. I would love to hear your opinion on that track. To me its like jazz poetry with incredible playing. In fact i don't think that i have ever heard anything like it before. I would love to find more music like it. Maybe you might know of something that comes close? 

 

 

Here is a link with the track  - i hope you enjoy it as much as i did. ¬¬

 

http://grooveshark.com/#!/search/song?q=The+Claudia+Quintet++1+Showtime+-+23rd+Street+Runs+Into+Heaven

 

let me know if the link works. 

post #453 of 752
Quote:
Originally Posted by magiccabbage View Post
 

very interesting post. I looked at your fav 100 albums list today and was surprised to find AC/DC in there. I have only heard of 2 artists from your top ten - Art Blakey and AC/DC. Avro part seems very interesting so i will give him a go. 

 

 

Do you like any of the Cecile Mclorin Salvant posts? Or maybe she isn't your cup of tea? Her track "what a little moonlight can do" is amazing! 

 

I also mentioned to you the group that Ralph turned me onto (the Claudia Quintet) before. I think at time time you weren't to impressed by the tracks that you heard, the problem there was that i could not find any songs from the albums that i liked on youtube for you to hear, but the 1st song from the album - "what is the beautiful" called  -  "showtime - 23rd street runs into heaven" is truly brilliant. I would love to hear your opinion on that track. To me its like jazz poetry with incredible playing. In fact i don't think that i have ever heard anything like it before. I would love to find more music like it. Maybe you might know of something that comes close? 

 

 

Here is a link with the track  - i hope you enjoy it as much as i did. ¬¬

 

http://grooveshark.com/#!/search/song?q=The+Claudia+Quintet++1+Showtime+-+23rd+Street+Runs+Into+Heaven

 

let me know if the link works. 

The list is in alphabetical order by artist and release year of the albums if there are several releases by the same artist, so there is really no top ten on that list – or unless you were referring simply to the first ten entries on the list. I should also update the list with a couple new additions, but I've been letting those new albums simmer a bit to see if they manage to hold their spell on me over a longer period of time. Also figuring out which babies to drop from the list is often a painful process.

 

Arvo Pärt is one of my favorite composers of all time and some of his works contain beauty beyond words. I was about to recommend you some albums to check out, but just remembered you can just check out the ones on the list to start with. He has a lot of releases on ECM and other labels as well including Harmonia Mundi. Not all of his works are masterpieces, but the really good ones are of quality almost unprecedented. His choral works are a thing to hear but many of his instrumental works are just as spellbinding.

 

What comes to Ms. Salvant, I listen to quite little vocal jazz but the two videos were enjoyable, albeit they didn't make me interested enough to go listen to more of her music. She has exceptional control of her voice and knows how to employ subtlety – not an all that common trait. The music is also very well recorded. "If This Isn't Love" reminded me of Paul McCartney's album "Kisses on the Bottom" from 2012, which I liked a lot but recall receiving a quite lukewarm reception from most people. That album is perhaps less on the jazz side however and more of a Traditional Pop record à la Frank Sinatra or Nat "King" Cole, even though Nat "King" Cole was a great jazz singer and pianist as well. If you have not heard the record, you might like it. No guarantees though. The sound on that album is phenomenal, absolutely phenomenal. The most recent vocal jazz album I've liked is Zara McFarlane's "If You Knew Her". You can check out the video for "Police & Thieves" here if you haven't already seen me linking it around Head-Fi a while back.

 

I tried the link you gave but when I press play my browser only seems to start loading the song but the music never starts. Like I think I said the group's music also does not appear to be available on Spotify. I can't remember what I said about the track you linked before, but I recall it making me feel quite weird, uneasy. Not sure exactly what quality about the music made me feel that way.

 

Oh, never mind, I got the track working now by messing around a bit on the site. Yeah this track I like quite a bit more. The spoken word component makes me think of "A Colloquial Dream (Scenes in the City)" from the expanded edition of Charles Mingus's Tijuana Moods album. The drums and bass have a nice groove together and the vibes make me think back to albums I like from the late 50s and early-to-mid 60s featuring Bobby Hutcherson. The piano at the end is also a welcome addition. Yeah I can dig this. I must admit I don't particularly like spoken word stuff done in this particular fashion, but I don't like to listen to only stuff I like so a component of something I don't like is also something I enjoy. Not sure if I'd be interested in investing money in the group's music, but I will keep their existence at the back of my head.

post #454 of 752
Quote:
Originally Posted by magiccabbage View Post
 

Ralph to you know of anything that sounds close to this track? I would love to find more stuff like this. It has a perfect mix of great vocals and virtuoso playing which i haven't really come across before. It usually seems to be one or the other, where you get an album with great playing but no vocal or an album with great vocals and mediocre playing (where the players hold back to much). 

 

Maybe you know of a few records where the players really go for it along with the singer but of course keeping that swing in mind? ¬

 

When listening to Ms. Salvant the first performer who comes to mind (at least for me) is the great Nina Simone. Fortunately (and unfortunately) there are lots of Nina Simone recordings currently available so I suggest that you spend a little time on youtube or on some on-demand music streaming service checking out Ms. Simone. I'm pretty sure that if you enjoy Ms. Salvant you will find Nina to your liking as well.

 

Full disclosure: Nina Simone's song "My Baby Just Cares For Me" is one of my all time favorite songs.

post #455 of 752
Quote:
Originally Posted by ralphp@optonline View Post
 

When listening to Ms. Salvant the first performer who comes to mind (at least for me) is the great Nina Simone. Fortunately (and unfortunately) there are lots of Nina Simone recordings currently available so I suggest that you spend a little time on youtube or on some on-demand music streaming service checking out Ms. Simone. I'm pretty sure that if you enjoy Ms. Salvant you will find Nina to your liking as well.

 

Full disclosure: Nina Simone's song "My Baby Just Cares For Me" is one of my all time favorite songs.

I have a good few Nina albums - and now that i think of it the song "mood indigo" is close enough to miss Salvant. 

post #456 of 752
Quote:
Originally Posted by ralphp@optonline View Post
 

 

Full disclosure: Nina Simone's song "My Baby Just Cares For Me" is one of my all time favorite songs.

 

Understandable.

Who DOESN'T love that version?  :biggrin:

post #457 of 752

Any of ye guys ever heard this ¬ Its one of my very favorite albums in my collection. Not strictly jazz (world jazz maybe) but i do think a hidden gem. Gurtu has to be one of the most important percussionists alive. 

 

 

The album is - Trilok Gurtu - The Glimpse

post #458 of 752

Yes Trilok is fantastic.

 

Here is another one which is not Jazz/jazz but does fit in the Jazz category because of the way the musicians are playing. It is also one of the best sounding albums I know.

Beautiful atmosphere, lots of space, concept album, a bit of a Pink Floyd vibe to it somehow.

The Sound Stage has an almost visual quality and the music made me read the old man and the sea again, kind of  like making your own movie in your head, reading the book and hearing the music simultaneously.

 

Flac or Wav, for some reason they are selling the flac cheaper( $15) than the wav ($20), why ?

 

Flac; http://www.soundliaison.com/products-from-our-studio-showcase-series/110-batik-flac

 

Wav; http://www.soundliaison.com/products-from-our-studio-showcase-series/109-batik

 


Edited by Kheadfi - 4/16/14 at 11:49am
post #459 of 752

Here is one that is 110% jazz, as in all jazz all the time. In fact this recording has more than enough jazz on it for at least 5 more recordings. Not only that but simply placing this CD in a rack next to any other recordings will turn those recordings into jazz, that's just how much jazz is on this recording.

 


Here is a link to video which features the entire original recording but be sure to close all other tabs on your browser before playing the video because there is so much jazz on this recording that it will turn any and all of the other tabs into jazz.

 

 

What real, 100% unfiltered jazz sounds like.

post #460 of 752
Quote:
Originally Posted by ralphp@optonline View Post
 

Here is one that is 110% jazz, as in all jazz all the time. In fact this recording has more than enough jazz on it for at least 5 more recordings. Not only that but simply placing this CD in a rack next to any other recordings will turn those recordings into jazz, that's just how much jazz is on this recording.

 

 


Here is a link to video which features the entire original recording but be sure to close all other tabs on your browser before playing the video because there is so much jazz on this recording that it will turn any and all of the other tabs into jazz.

 

 

 

What real, 100% unfiltered jazz sounds like.

I have this album. I like it but don't love it. The big band thing is something I haven't really gotten my head around yet. I tend to like smaller groups. 

post #461 of 752
Quote:
Originally Posted by magiccabbage View Post
 

I have this album. I like it but don't love it. The big band thing is something I haven't really gotten my head around yet. I tend to like smaller groups. 


That's quite all right as long as you acknowledge that Atomic Basie is 110% jazz :D

post #462 of 752

As the years have gone by I've started to like guitars less and less. As someone who used to listen to quite a bit of rock, I simply can't stand most guitar-based music nowadays aside from the very finest that's available in metal and rock. I've never particularly enjoyed guitars in a jazz context. Ulf Wakenius however is one of those people who adds a unique personality to their playing. I've been listening to his Vagabond album lately and I enjoy it quite a bit. Mr. Wakenius is perhaps best know for working with Oscar Peterson.

 

 

post #463 of 752
Quote:
Originally Posted by TJ Elite View Post
 

As the years have gone by I've started to like guitars less and less. As someone who used to listen to quite a bit of rock, I simply can't stand most guitar-based music nowadays aside from the very finest that's available in metal and rock. I've never particularly enjoyed guitars in a jazz context. Ulf Wakenius however is one of those people who adds a unique personality to their playing. I've been listening to his Vagabond album lately and I enjoy it quite a bit. Mr. Wakenius is perhaps best know for working with Oscar Peterson.

 

 

 

This is one of my Favorite guitar albums of late ¬  It really is incredible, the playing and the sound production. 

 

 

post #464 of 752

Lage is an exceptional player! If you like him on that one, you should give Common Ground by The New Gary Burton Quartet a go. Fantastic group of musicians. 

post #465 of 752
Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeDoe View Post
 

Lage is an exceptional player! If you like him on that one, you should give Common Ground by The New Gary Burton Quartet a go. Fantastic group of musicians. 

yea, i have it, its great. I love the the cymbal work on "Remembering Tano" it is beautiful.  

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