or Connect
Head-Fi.org › Forums › Misc.-Category Forums › Music › On a mission to like jazz
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

On a mission to like jazz - Page 30

post #436 of 2133
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quinto View Post





Nobody sounds like Ben Webster..I was fed Webster on a daily basis being a toddler..biggrin.gif  

-sounds great on vinyl-

This is a very fine album.
Ben Webster gets such a warm smoky tone that you can actually smell the smoke when you play this record!
post #437 of 2133

^^  I like Ben Websters' work..

post #438 of 2133

See You at the Fair is another great Ben Webster record.

post #439 of 2133
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quinto View Post
 

:eek:

Webster is a famous name (so the name does kind of ring a bell) - or at least it sounds that way. But yea, I haven't heard his music that i'm aware of. It's funny how things like that happen every now and again. 

 

Keep in mind though, I'm only 28 and have been listening to jazz for only 5 or 6 years (properly - whatever that means). Also Ireland doesn't really have an audience for jazz. There is only one jazz club in the capitol - J.JSmiths and if i'm honest its really more of a blues bar. 

 

There are lots of Jazz Giants that i'm sure i know nothing about. The last meet I was at I met this guy - a real Jazz head. He mentioned a lot of people who i didn't know. I mean a lot. I love that though - how the rabbit hole goes ever deeper. 


Edited by magiccabbage - 4/8/14 at 5:02am
post #440 of 2133
Quote:
Originally Posted by magiccabbage View Post
 

Webster is a famous name (so the name does kind of ring a bell) - or at least it sounds that way. But yea, I haven't heard his music that i'm aware of. It's funny how things like that happen every now and again. 

 

Keep in mind though, I'm only 28 and have been listening to jazz for only 5 or 6 years (properly - whatever that means). Also Ireland doesn't really have an audience for jazz. There is only one jazz club in the capitol - J.JSmiths and if i'm honest its really more of a blues bar. 

 

There are lots of Jazz Giants that i'm sure i know nothing about. The last meet I was at I met this guy - a real Jazz head. He mentioned a lot of people who i didn't know. I mean a lot. 


It's totally cool man, I have a old man's perspective :D 


Edited by Quinto - 4/8/14 at 5:51am
post #441 of 2133
Quote:
Originally Posted by jasonb View Post
 

I can't believe this thread is up to 29 pages.

 

I've come along way with jazz since I started this thread. I just counted and I have 57 jazz/jazz fusion CD's now. My library is growing pretty quickly.

 

I think the thread could by over 290 pages filled with recommendations and there would still be plenty more great recordings still left for the next couple of hundred pages:basshead:

Quote:
Originally Posted by magiccabbage View Post
 

Hey Ralph do you have any idea why Wynton played under the alias - "E. Dankworth" on the Marcus album - "Deep in the shed" ? The last track is titled "Dankworth" and i was wondering what the significance is. Maybe "Danworth" was a player? 

 

 

It was funny because i just got to the end of the album today and man that last track is smoking hot! I looked at the sleeve and it said the trumpet player is E. Dankworth then I Googled the name and found that it was actually Wynton. 

My guess as to why Wynton used a pseudonym would be because of some kind of contract issue. Anyway I'm glad that you like the CD.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by TJ Elite View Post


Certain albums that do get mentioned a lot also sometimes deserve it. What you mentioned about it being easy for a person to be overwhelmed nowadays by the sheer amount of music available is exactly why threads such as this can be valuable to those who are looking for recommendations that have been filtered for them through personal experience from a list of hundreds of names that could be mentioned. I would find it quite backwards to not recommend Soul Station or Out to Lunch! to someone just because they are popular records. I'd rather recommend a record to someone that might change their life than something they might just like. Obscurity in itself speaks nothing about the musical value of a work. Are there astonishing records that aren't very well known? Certainly. Should a person listen to Evan Parker before ever hearing Charlie Parker? Probably not, unless the person comes from a very particular musical background. As much as I enjoy Evan Parker.


More does not automatically equal better. I prefer albums, releases that form a coherent whole. One thing I like about vinyl over digital releases is that the reissues of older recordings aren't infested with countless alternate takes dumped at the end of the disc. Even though often interesting and sometimes even superior to the "master" take, when listening to the album from start to finish they ruin the experience of hearing the album as intended by throwing all the outtakes at you after the last song. Or, sometimes after the album take. How many people out there want to listen to the same song twice in a row? Even if the music is different.

Last summer I helped my cousin who lives over 350 miles away and was visiting locate a copy of the complete Bitches Brew sessions for mere 20€ because he is a huge fan of classical and jazz and that album in particular. I personally don't own a copy of it so that should speak volumes about how interested I am in the Complete Sun Ship Sessions as well, which IS available on vinyl by the way released by Mosaic Records and cut by Kevin Gray. The deluxe edition of A Love Supreme I find worth owning for example, for it contains alternative performances with two additional musicians including Archie Shepp (on a separate disc), as well as the live performance of the suite in Antibes. The Complete 1961 Village Vanguard Recordings box set is worth owning because it compiles all recordings taken from these nights and released on various albums over the years into one complete set in the order they were recorded complete with the previously unissued numbers. The Sun Ship set however as far as I'm aware exists merely because it is one of the rare instances where the complete session tapes have survived. As much as I enjoy the music, I'm not interested in listening to false starts, incomplete takes and takes that didn't make the final cut and slowly watching the music take shape. Even if it is a posthumous release, effort was put into putting the album together and I'm personally not interested in investing in what is essentially a scrap book. Coltrane is my favorite musician of all time but that does not mean I would've been willing to pay money to watch him eat breakfast in the morning, take a dump on the toilet, or scribble down a few notes on paper after practising on his saxophone. I'd rather watch one of my favorite movies than just a long documentary about how it was made even if that can be most informative. Getting to actually experience where the album has been split into sides on vinyl offers me a greater sense of satisfaction than splitting a recording session into its atoms even if it is jazz and dissecting it under a microscope. Just the way I'm wired. I know some people live for that.
 

My birthday is coming up and to treat myself I've got a bunch of ACT releases ordered as well as a Supersilent album coming to me via Amazon. Very excited especially for my second Rudresh Mahanthappa album and ditto for Supersilent.

I completely understand your point however in the digital age one can simply make a playlist and listen to just the original album's tracks, the outtakes or the whole enchilada.

 

By the way, avant-garde/free jazz is perhaps my favorite jazz sub-genre but I tend not to recommend too many free jazz recordings since often when I do recommend a free jazz recording the responses tend to be along the lines "what is this noise" and then a once lively thread just dies:confused_face_2:. But for you I will make an exception but please forgive me if you know this one already.

 

The Dave Holland Quartet - Conference of the Birds

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by magiccabbage View Post
 

never heard of him - will check it out

Back when jazz was America's pop music in the big band era (approximately 1928 to 1950) there were lots of big bands but two of the most popular orchestras were led by Count Basie and Duke Ellington.

 

Count Basie's star tenor player was the great Lester Young and Duke Ellington's star tenor player was Ben Webster. Ellington also had a star alto player in Johhny Hodges but that's another story. Although it seems impossible today back then a tenor sax player could actually be a major popular music star. I guess the closest thing today would a star guitar player, like Jeff Beck or Eric Clapton.

 

Anyway most other tenor sax players (and there were plenty of them) would try to sound like either Lester Young or Ben Webster so Webster was truly a major figure in the world of jazz, which meant he was also a major popular music star.

 

The Ben Webster recordings that have been mentioned thus far are mostly from the post big band era when due the rising popularity of rock and roll most of the big bands had disbanded (with two notable exceptions: Count Basie and Duke Ellington) and jazz was being played by smaller groups, anywhere from trios to octets. For a good example of what made both Webster and Young such big stars check out these recordings:

 

Duke Ellington - The Blanton Webster Band

 

An absolutely fantastic 3 disc set containing some of the greatest big band jazz ever recorded. The Blanton in the title refers to Jimmy Blanton, the tragically short lived bassist who is credited with developing the modern style of jazz bass playing which is still how the bass is played.

 

Count Basie - The Complete Decca Recordings

 

Another 3 disc set also containing some of the greatest big band jazz ever recorded and lots of great Lester Young solos.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Quinto View Post
 


It totally cool man, I'm have a old man's perspective :D

As an old man (I'm 59) I (rep)resent that remark:D 


Edited by ralphp@optonline - 4/8/14 at 5:47am
post #442 of 2133

I agree.  I keep coming back to this thread due to the fact that the recommendations aren't your typical 'kind of blue', 'giant steps', etc...recommendations.  Three albums I've had going today that aren't on many 'lists' are these:

 

 

 

I remember around '95 when I was a sophomore in HS my jazz director played Cherokee from the GRP Live album...after hearing that I got pretty serious about playing the trumpet.  I wanted to wail like Sandoval, Brecker & Findley.  I typically prefer the small group type jazz (trio's, quintets, etc...) but sometimes I love this exciting big band sound.

 

I remember I discovered Eddie 'Lockjaw' Davis and Wes Montgomery around the same time when I was a teenager.  Definitely worth checking into these guys if you haven't heard them before. 

post #443 of 2133
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mingus Ah Um View Post
 

I agree.  I keep coming back to this thread due to the fact that the recommendations aren't your typical 'kind of blue', 'giant steps', etc...recommendations.  Three albums I've had going today that aren't on many 'lists' are these:

 

 

 

 

 

I remember around '95 when I was a sophomore in HS my jazz director played Cherokee from the GRP Live album...after hearing that I got pretty serious about playing the trumpet.  I wanted to wail like Sandoval, Brecker & Findley.  I typically prefer the small group type jazz (trio's, quintets, etc...) but sometimes I love this exciting big band sound.

 

I remember I discovered Eddie 'Lockjaw' Davis and Wes Montgomery around the same time when I was a teenager.  Definitely worth checking into these guys if you haven't heard them before. 

As a guitar player I know Wes of course, but hadn't heard of Eddie before. 

 

Speaking of guitar players, Russel Malone has become one of my favorites in jazz recently - I love how he adopts Benson's technique the minute he drops the plectrum. Here is a great cover of an old sam cooke tune. ¬

 

 

he rips it up a bit more  here ¬ sorry bout the quality 

 

post #444 of 2133


Just ordered this 18 cd box for 36,65 euro at Amazon.de!

 

I had an eye on this set, original from 1997, for years, but price was + $275 second hand and rusty :eek: 

 

Price at Amazon uk is more then double (69 GBP) :blink:

 

This made my day :D 


Edited by Quinto - 4/8/14 at 3:42pm
post #445 of 2133

 

 

Lenny Breau was special IMO..since I listen to him, the others seem ehhh boring :wink_face:

 

Too bad he didn't record much since substance abuse took a lot of his time, bloody shame :(

post #446 of 2133
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quinto View Post
 

 

 

 

 

Lenny Breau was special IMO..since I listen to him, the others seem ehhh boring :wink_face:

 

Too bad he didn't record much since substance abuse took a lot of his time, bloody shame :(

Lenny was a monster player, I would give an arm and a leg to see him live. 

 

Have you seen this ¬ he rips it up on that crazy 7 string! 

 

 

post #447 of 2133
Quote:
Originally Posted by ralphp@optonline View Post
 

 

 

 

 

Ralph to you know of anything that sounds close to this track? I would love to find more stuff like this. It has a perfect mix of great vocals and virtuoso playing which i haven't really come across before. It usually seems to be one or the other, where you get an album with great playing but no vocal or an album with great vocals and mediocre playing (where the players hold back to much). 

 

Maybe you know of a few records where the players really go for it along with the singer but of course keeping that swing in mind? ¬

 

 

post #448 of 2133
Quote:
Originally Posted by magiccabbage View Post
 

Ralph to you know of anything that sounds close to this track? I would love to find more stuff like this. It has a perfect mix of great vocals and virtuoso playing which i haven't really come across before. It usually seems to be one or the other, where you get an album with great playing but no vocal or an album with great vocals and mediocre playing (where the players hold back to much). 

 

Maybe you know of a few records where the players really go for it along with the singer but of course keeping that swing in mind? ¬

 

this past Monday April 7th I posted links to the audio stream for WKCR's annual Billie Holiday birthday broadcast. The Billie Holiday recordings which feature Lester Young on tenor sax are considered to be among the greatest ever vocalist with instrumental accompaniment ever. I guess you missed your chance:basshead: - only kidding. However if you have never heard Billie Holiday with Lester Young than I suggest that you give these recordings a listen, they might be just what you are looking for.

post #449 of 2133
Quote:
Originally Posted by ralphp@optonline View Post
 

this past Monday April 7th I posted links to the audio stream for WKCR's annual Billie Holiday birthday broadcast. The Billie Holiday recordings which feature Lester Young on tenor sax are considered to be among the greatest ever vocalist with instrumental accompaniment ever. I guess you missed your chance:basshead: - only kidding. However if you have never heard Billie Holiday with Lester Young than I suggest that you give these recordings a listen, they might be just what you are looking for.

I'm on it

 

i might get this - yea?¬ 

 


Edited by magiccabbage - 4/10/14 at 5:18am
post #450 of 2133

Anything else like that but newer with better production? Or maybe it sounds great i haven't heard it yet of course. 

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Music
Head-Fi.org › Forums › Misc.-Category Forums › Music › On a mission to like jazz