or Connect
Head-Fi.org › Forums › Misc.-Category Forums › Music › On a mission to like jazz
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

On a mission to like jazz - Page 29

post #421 of 2136
Quote:
Originally Posted by magiccabbage View Post
 

I was listening to this today, great stuff and what a line up - I see Wycliffe Gordan (I wish he would sing more on his records, he's got that gospel voice.)  and Scotty Barnhart on trombone there. 

 

The question I wanted to ask is about Scotty. I don't know much about him - have you heard this album or would you recommend something else that he has played on? ¬ 

 


Okay well you finally managed to stump me. While I am quite familiar with Wycliffe Gordon, I am not familiar with Scotty Barnhart. I imagine that my unfamiliarity with Barnhart is because, based on his listing on All Music, he is mostly a session player rather than a leader. On the other hand, Gordon is great session player, a fine leader and excellent composer and arranger (Gordon did many arrangement for the Lincoln Center Jazz Orchestra while he was member of that group).

 

For some reason there are several jazz trombone players who are also great arrangers - Wycliffe Gordon, Bob Brookmeyer and Melba Liston are just three examples of this phenomena.

 

Brookmeyer had a long career that featured many great arrangements for Gerry Mulligan, Thad Jones and Mel Lewis to name but a few.

 

Melba Liston is primarily known for her many great arrangements for pianist and band leader Randy Weston although she also did arrangements for Quincy Jones, Johnny Griffin and Milt Jackson.

 

I'm sorry if I appear to be "showing off" my jazz knowledge but jazz is so much more than the few Miles Davis, John Coltrane, Bill Evans and Dave Brubeck recordings that always get mentioned in "jazz recommendations" threads.

 

Check out Liston's great arrangements on Randy Weston's 1993 recording "The Spirits of Our Ancestors"

 

and for a taste of Brookmeyer tasty arrangements check out "Gerry Mulligan and the Concert Jazz Band at the Village Vanguard" recorded in 1961

 

As always, Enjoy!

 

And please listen responsibly :wink_face:

post #422 of 2136
Quote:
Originally Posted by ralphp@optonline View Post
 


Okay well you finally managed to stump me. While I am quite familiar with Wycliffe Gordon, I am not familiar with Scotty Barnhart. I imagine that my unfamiliarity with Barnhart is because, based on his listing on All Music, he is mostly a session player rather than a leader. On the other hand, Gordon is great session player, a fine leader and excellent composer and arranger (Gordon did many arrangement for the Lincoln Center Jazz Orchestra while he was member of that group).

 

For some reason there are several jazz trombone players who are also great arrangers - Wycliffe Gordon, Bob Brookmeyer and Melba Liston are just three examples of this phenomena.

 

Brookmeyer had a long career that featured many great arrangements for Gerry Mulligan, Thad Jones and Mel Lewis to name but a few.

 

Melba Liston is primarily known for her many great arrangements for pianist and band leader Randy Weston although she also did arrangements for Quincy Jones, Johnny Griffin and Milt Jackson.

 

I'm sorry if I appear to be "showing off" my jazz knowledge but jazz is so much more than the few Miles Davis, John Coltrane, Bill Evans and Dave Brubeck recordings that always get mentioned in "jazz recommendations" threads.

 

Check out Liston's great arrangements on Randy Weston's 1993 recording "The Spirits of Our Ancestors"

 

and for a taste of Brookmeyer tasty arrangements check out "Gerry Mulligan and the Concert Jazz Band at the Village Vanguard" recorded in 1961

 

As always, Enjoy!

 

And please listen responsibly :wink_face:

Thanks for the info - as for the "session player" comment i was actually thinking of starting a session player thread. I might get to work on i tonight. 

 

Cheers 

 

  Paddy

post #423 of 2136
Quote:
Originally Posted by magiccabbage View Post
 

Thanks for the info - as for the "session player" comment i was actually thinking of starting a session player thread. I might get to work on i tonight. 

 

Cheers 

 

  Paddy


Sounds like a good subject for a thread. Hopefully this song will serve as the thread's theme song:

 

 

The Kinks - Session Man (yeah, I know it's not jazz but it fits:beyersmile:)

post #424 of 2136
Quote:

Originally Posted by ralphp@optonline View Post

 

I'm sorry if I appear to be "showing off" my jazz knowledge but jazz is so much more than the few Miles Davis, John Coltrane, Bill Evans and Dave Brubeck recordings that always get mentioned in "jazz recommendations" threads.

I feel the vast majority of posts in this thread have been everything but about those records...

 


 

 

My record collection contains only mere thirty John Coltrane albums (I need more!), but for some reason Sun Ship has been missing from it for the longest time. Recently I saw it on CD at my local record store for a reasonable price and decided to pick it up. I must say I wasn't disappointed! For some reason I was always under the impression this was one of Coltrane's studio dates with a large ensemble but it is in fact a session with his classic quartet featuring McCoy Tyner, Jimmy Garrison and Elvin Jones. Musically the album is on the more avant-garde side of A Love Supreme, bordering free jazz. Two of the numbers are slower ballads somewhat reminiscent of both Psalm from the aforementioned A Love Supreme as well the Crescent album recorded a year before. Coltrane's solos are more fierce than on many prior recordings, McCoy is on fire as always, but perhaps most significantly I feel Elvin Jones' drumming is exceptionally impressive on this date. My record store has the album available on vinyl and I shall soon be picking it up in that format as well for this album surely deserves it!

post #425 of 2136
Quote:
Originally Posted by ralphp@optonline View Post

 

Two recommendations for you, however both are box sets and while neither is cheap both are well worth the money.

 

Miles Davis - The Complete Live at the Plugged Nickel 1965

 

And: Miles Davis - Quintet Live In Europe 1967 - The Bootleg Series Volume 1

 

These two releases serve as bookends for the great Miles Davis mid 1960s quintet. The Plugged Nickle recordings were made in late December of 1965, at the end of the first year that the quintet had been together and Live in Europe was recorded in late 1967 near the end of the quintet being together. And both are amazing examples of the almost telepathic communication that existed between the members of the quintet. All in all two of the finest live recordings of modern jazz ever made.

 

I have a lot of that Quintet on CD so I wasn't looking for recommendations.

BTW, the "Plugged Nickel" set is actually out of print.

 

The question was:

are there any other fans of that great quintet out there?

I would say the answer is a resounding yes!

post #426 of 2136
Quote:
Originally Posted by TJ Elite View Post
 

I feel the vast majority of posts in this thread have been everything but about those records...

 


 

My record collection contains only mere thirty John Coltrane albums (I need more!), but for some reason Sun Ship has been missing from it for the longest time. Recently I saw it on CD at my local record store for a reasonable price and decided to pick it up. I must say I wasn't disappointed! For some reason I was always under the impression this was one of Coltrane's studio dates with a large ensemble but it is in fact a session with his classic quartet featuring McCoy Tyner, Jimmy Garrison and Elvin Jones. Musically the album is on the more avant-garde side of A Love Supreme, bordering free jazz. Two of the numbers are slower ballads somewhat reminiscent of both Psalm from the aforementioned A Love Supreme as well the Crescent album recorded a year before. Coltrane's solos are more fierce than on many prior recordings, McCoy is on fire as always, but perhaps most significantly I feel Elvin Jones' drumming is exceptionally impressive on this date. My record store has the album available on vinyl and I shall soon be picking it up in that format as well for this album surely deserves it!

You are quite right about this thread NOT containing all that much of the typical jazz recommendations, that's exactly why I keep on posting and keep on nudging it away from all those standard recordings. One can quite easily find any number of "Top 100 Jazz Albums", "Desert Island Jazz Discs", "Jazz for Newbies", etc. lists with a simple google search so why repeat the same thing here. Onward to obscurity! Buddy Terry or Bishop Norman Williams anyone?

 

Both of these LPs are long out of print. I have an autographed copy of "Bishop's Bag" and a copy of the Buddy Terry as well.

 

As far as Sun Ship goes, I would forgo the vinyl and get the two disc "Sun Ship: The Complete Sessions" release. Lots more music and lots of good information about the recording sessions.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris J View Post
 

 

I have a lot of that Quintet on CD so I wasn't looking for recommendations.

BTW, the "Plugged Nickel" set is actually out of print.

 

The question was:

are there any other fans of that great quintet out there?

I would say the answer is a resounding yes!

Duh! Absolutely I'm a big fan of the 1960s Miles Davis Quintet.

 

Both of the about quoted posts got to thinking about how much our opinions of music are affected by how and when we first learned the music. Back in the 1970s when I first started listening to and learning about jazz there was no "Complete Plugged Nickle" or "Complete Sun Ship" and many really good jazz records could only be found as very expensive Japanese imports. Now just about anything is available to buy, download (legally or less than legally) or stream. Great news for all of you just learning about this great music called jazz but I must say that it be somewhat overwhelming to have so much to chose from. I also miss the thrill of hunting down that elusive record, now you just do a quick search and bingo there it is on ebay and for a good price.

 

So has anyone else been listening to the wonderful Billie Holiday on this her birthday? Here's are links once again:

 

mp3 stream: http://kanga.college.columbia.edu:8000/listen.pls

 

RealAudio stream: http://kanga.college.columbia.edu/ramgen/broadcast/wkcr.rm

post #427 of 2136
Thread Starter 

I can't believe this thread is up to 29 pages.

 

I've come along way with jazz since I started this thread. I just counted and I have 57 jazz/jazz fusion CD's now. My library is growing pretty quickly.


Edited by jasonb - 4/7/14 at 5:16pm
post #428 of 2136
Quote:
Originally Posted by jasonb View Post
 

I can't believe this thread is up to 29 pages.

 

I've come along way with jazz since I started this thread. I just counted and I have 57 jazz/jazz fusion CD's now. My library is growing pretty quickly.

Its probably my favorite thread at the moment. 

post #429 of 2136
Quote:
Originally Posted by jasonb View Post
 

I can't believe this thread is up to 29 pages.

 

I've come along way with jazz since I started this thread. I just counted and I have 57 jazz/jazz fusion CD's now. My library is growing pretty quickly.

 

What other music do you listen to?  

post #430 of 2136

Hey Ralph do you have any idea why Wynton played under the alias - "E. Dankworth" on the Marcus album - "Deep in the shed" ? The last track is titled "Dankworth" and i was wondering what the significance is. Maybe "Danworth" was a player? 

 

 

It was funny because i just got to the end of the album today and man that last track is smoking hot! I looked at the sleeve and it said the trumpet player is E. Dankworth then I Googled the name and found that it was actually Wynton. 

post #431 of 2136
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by elvergun View Post
 

 

What other music do you listen to?  

Progressive rock and progressive metal, and some various electronic music sometimes as well. Here is my Last.fm profile page if you really want to see examples. http://www.last.fm/user/mcjasonb


Edited by jasonb - 4/7/14 at 5:56pm
post #432 of 2136
Quote:
Originally Posted by ralphp@optonline View Post

You are quite right about this thread NOT containing all that much of the typical jazz recommendations, that's exactly why I keep on posting and keep on nudging it away from all those standard recordings. One can quite easily find any number of "Top 100 Jazz Albums", "Desert Island Jazz Discs", "Jazz for Newbies", etc. lists with a simple google search so why repeat the same thing here. Onward to obscurity!



As far as Sun Ship goes, I would forgo the vinyl and get the two disc "Sun Ship: The Complete Sessions" release. Lots more music and lots of good information about the recording sessions.
Certain albums that do get mentioned a lot also sometimes deserve it. What you mentioned about it being easy for a person to be overwhelmed nowadays by the sheer amount of music available is exactly why threads such as this can be valuable to those who are looking for recommendations that have been filtered for them through personal experience from a list of hundreds of names that could be mentioned. I would find it quite backwards to not recommend Soul Station or Out to Lunch! to someone just because they are popular records. I'd rather recommend a record to someone that might change their life than something they might just like. Obscurity in itself speaks nothing about the musical value of a work. Are there astonishing records that aren't very well known? Certainly. Should a person listen to Evan Parker before ever hearing Charlie Parker? Probably not, unless the person comes from a very particular musical background. As much as I enjoy Evan Parker.


More does not automatically equal better. I prefer albums, releases that form a coherent whole. One thing I like about vinyl over digital releases is that the reissues of older recordings aren't infested with countless alternate takes dumped at the end of the disc. Even though often interesting and sometimes even superior to the "master" take, when listening to the album from start to finish they ruin the experience of hearing the album as intended by throwing all the outtakes at you after the last song. Or, sometimes after the album take. How many people out there want to listen to the same song twice in a row? Even if the music is different.

Last summer I helped my cousin who lives over 350 miles away and was visiting locate a copy of the complete Bitches Brew sessions for mere 20€ because he is a huge fan of classical and jazz and that album in particular. I personally don't own a copy of it so that should speak volumes about how interested I am in the Complete Sun Ship Sessions as well, which IS available on vinyl by the way released by Mosaic Records and cut by Kevin Gray. The deluxe edition of A Love Supreme I find worth owning for example, for it contains alternative performances with two additional musicians including Archie Shepp (on a separate disc), as well as the live performance of the suite in Antibes. The Complete 1961 Village Vanguard Recordings box set is worth owning because it compiles all recordings taken from these nights and released on various albums over the years into one complete set in the order they were recorded complete with the previously unissued numbers. The Sun Ship set however as far as I'm aware exists merely because it is one of the rare instances where the complete session tapes have survived. As much as I enjoy the music, I'm not interested in listening to false starts, incomplete takes and takes that didn't make the final cut and slowly watching the music take shape. Even if it is a posthumous release, effort was put into putting the album together and I'm personally not interested in investing in what is essentially a scrap book. Coltrane is my favorite musician of all time but that does not mean I would've been willing to pay money to watch him eat breakfast in the morning, take a dump on the toilet, or scribble down a few notes on paper after practising on his saxophone. I'd rather watch one of my favorite movies than just a long documentary about how it was made even if that can be most informative. Getting to actually experience where the album has been split into sides on vinyl offers me a greater sense of satisfaction than splitting a recording session into its atoms even if it is jazz and dissecting it under a microscope. Just the way I'm wired. I know some people live for that.



My birthday is coming up and to treat myself I've got a bunch of ACT releases ordered as well as a Supersilent album coming to me via Amazon. Very excited especially for my second Rudresh Mahanthappa album and ditto for Supersilent.
post #433 of 2136


Nobody sounds like Ben Webster..I was fed Webster on a daily basis being a toddler..:D 

 

-sounds great on vinyl-

post #434 of 2136
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quinto View Post
 


Nobody sounds like Ben Webster..I was fed Webster on a daily basis being a toddler..:D 

 

-sounds great on vinyl-

never heard of him - will check it out

post #435 of 2136
Quote:
Originally Posted by magiccabbage View Post
 

never heard of him - ..

:eek:

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Music
Head-Fi.org › Forums › Misc.-Category Forums › Music › On a mission to like jazz