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On a mission to like jazz - Page 15

post #211 of 814
Quote:
Originally Posted by ralphp@optonline View Post
 

 

As I stated in an earlier post I'm doing my very best not to go negative. Sure I don't care for about 99.9999% of all smooth jazz but since I really like free jazz I'm biting my tongue on the smooth jazz posts because then the flame wars start, as in post along the lines of "Cecil Taylor can't play the piano, all he does is bang on the keys" and "Albert Ayler just played noise". So I'm not commenting on any of the artists listed in other member's posts and I hope that that everyone will act the same. What I am trying to do is for every post about smooth jazz to respond with a post about something that is not smooth jazz, without any negative comments. I'm sorry if I am coming off as somewhat preachy but I've seen enough of these types of threads, i.e. threads about music recommendations, to know that once things go negative everything just falls apart.

 

You would enlighten me with some good free jazz tbh. Threads like these can always bring unexpected surprises. Granted I am a head fi n00b, but please don't hold back because of possible negative feedback. Outspoken music calls for outspoken opinions. It reminds me of when I was a teenager working in a shop that sold clothes, gadgets, cd's etc. When I played music we would get both very negative and very positive reactions. When random coworker x was playing his or mostly her cd, nobody even noticed the bg drone.

 

So one day while playing Venetian snares(extremely weird syncopations, time signatures and loud, rude and brutal music) a mom came to me asking what music was playing with tears in her eyes because her heavily autistic son was dancing for the first time in his life. They simply never found music that would get to him. That same CD also got the odd: "this makes me nauseous". Yeah my boss was pretty "progressive" looking back at it :D

 

Onto freejazz again: I have been a collector of anything ESP Disk, also like the projects of sun ra, Art Ensemble Of Chicago. Tzadik and most of what Zorn does is among the most stunning pieces of music to my ears, anyway. If you decide to open a Freejazz thread I'm subbed!

post #212 of 814
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hijodelbrx View Post
 

Y'know, over the years I've seen a number  of 'Jazz appreciation' on various websites.  While there's always exceptions, invariably, the majority of the recs are for music from the past.  While I own, respect, and love so much Jazz from days gone by, I'm always left feeling that a true disservice is being done to artists who are living the life and creating great music TODAY.  I firmly believe, and this pertains to other music besides Jazz as well, there's music that goes underappreciated simply due to not having been done in the right 'time' period.  In other words, if it HAD been created back in the day, it might have much more historical significance.  Players that will never have the name recognition of a Coltrane, Rollins, etc. but are equal in ability and artistic significance.  I hope I'm making some kind of sense. 

 

I'm trying to make this point HERE because Head-Fi is one of the few sites (audiophile or music) where I see substantial traffic primarily by young(ish) posters.  I think it's important that young music-lover's don't get the impression that Jazz is a music for old-timers.  I know I've always had this feeling about Classical, and the declining number of working symphony orchestras worldwide suggests I'm not alone, I've read that there's great concern for the future of Classical music in the generations to come.  I worry that Jazz may suffer from the same kind of misconception.  Jazz has always been a hard sell.  Let's face it, it's advanced musicology!  Historically, the Jazz musicians life has always been difficult.  Today it's even harder. In all music, it's not enough to simply play great music.  Business and self-marketing play a huge part so I feel while it's certainly rewarding, important, and even essential, to appreciate what's come before, we should also celebrate what's happening NOW.

 

I also feel making lists with dozens of artists can be a form of information overload.  To the person making the list it's perfectly logical but I imagine it could be too much for a person not familiar with the genre.  In this spirit I'll make a recommendation of one artist who I consider to be one of the greats of our time.  Anat Cohen.  I 1st heard her on the 'WAVERLY SEVEN' record (strongly recommended).  From that record I got into her bandmates, who are equally amazing players, and her tremendous record label; Anzic.  Today I own many Anat Cohen recordings and records where she's a sideman.  I also own records by many of her bandmates and many records recorded by the Anzic record company.  And it all started by picking up a used copy of the Waverly Seven from a used CD shop!  IMO, if Anat Cohen was a recording artist in the '50's she'd be as historically significant as any of the greats from that era!  Check her out on Youtube, she's truly a force to be reckoned with!  

 

Sorry for the rant, hope I didn't bore TOO many of you!;)    

I really resonate with the classical music being in decline. However, I think there's an overlap with the big composers bio's and todays jazz musicians. Bach's life for instance was not exactly rock n roll, but it was not glamor either.His works were carried to the grave except for some church commissioned stuff that stuck around. He only became truly appreciated after popular composers kept going back to his innovative work that historically he became the genius he is today. True genius will stand the test of time, i'm pretty sure. Now more than ever. It's hard to imagine the dark ages while typing this on a forum.

 

Today we must live of other things than selling a disc. This will result in big changes industry wide, and tbh, I hope the royalty system will change. Meantime all this technology flooding music will hopefully produce the next well tempered keyboard pieces of tomorrow.

post #213 of 814
Quote:
Originally Posted by durkk View Post
 

I really resonate with the classical music being in decline. However, I think there's an overlap with the big composers bio's and todays jazz musicians. Bach's life for instance was not exactly rock n roll, but it was not glamor either.His works were carried to the grave except for some church commissioned stuff that stuck around. He only became truly appreciated after popular composers kept going back to his innovative work that historically he became the genius he is today. True genius will stand the test of time, i'm pretty sure. Now more than ever. It's hard to imagine the dark ages while typing this on a forum.

 

Today we must live of other things than selling a disc. This will result in big changes industry wide, and tbh, I hope the royalty system will change. Meantime all this technology flooding music will hopefully produce the next well tempered keyboard pieces of tomorrow.


Much of what you wrote applies more to popular music and jazz hasn't been popular music since the late 1940s. Modern day jazz musicians have always had to rely on playing live to make a living. The money they made from record and CD sales was just a nice bonus.

 

However I do I agree that one of things that makes a true artistic genius is the ability to pass the test of time and as great as many contemporary musicians may be, only the passage of time will determine whether they are true geniuses.

post #214 of 814
Thread Starter 

Dear jason brown,

Here is an update to your order #6049645:
Qty Artist Title Status*
1 Mahavishnu Orchestra Birds of Fire Shipped (from KY on 01/16/14)
1 Weather Report Weather Report [1982] Shipped (from KY on 01/16/14)
1 Oliver Nelson Blues and the Abstract Truth [Remastered] Shipped (from KY on 01/16/14)
1 Wayne Shorter Speak No Evil [Remastered] Shipped (from KY on 01/16/14)
1 Eric Dolphy Out to Lunch [Remastered] Shipped (from KY on 01/16/14)
1 Jeff Beck Blow by Blow/Wired/There and Back [Box] Shipped (from KY on 01/16/14)
1 Weather Report Mysterious Traveller Shipped (from KY on 01/16/14)

 

I just received all of these from FYE.com with the exception of the 3 Jeff Beck albums which I'm assuming must have shipped separately from the rest since it didn't arrive yet. I also have a copy of "Cafe Blue" by Patricia Barber on it's way from Amazon.

 

I'm trying out the Eric Dolphy album right now.  

post #215 of 814
Quote:
Originally Posted by jasonb View Post
 

Dear jason brown,

Here is an update to your order #6049645:
Qty Artist Title Status*
1 Mahavishnu Orchestra Birds of Fire Shipped (from KY on 01/16/14)
1 Weather Report Weather Report [1982] Shipped (from KY on 01/16/14)
1 Oliver Nelson Blues and the Abstract Truth [Remastered] Shipped (from KY on 01/16/14)
1 Wayne Shorter Speak No Evil [Remastered] Shipped (from KY on 01/16/14)
1 Eric Dolphy Out to Lunch [Remastered] Shipped (from KY on 01/16/14)
1 Jeff Beck Blow by Blow/Wired/There and Back [Box] Shipped (from KY on 01/16/14)
1 Weather Report Mysterious Traveller Shipped (from KY on 01/16/14)

 

I just received all of these from FYE.com with the exception of the 3 Jeff Beck albums which I'm assuming must have shipped separately from the rest since it didn't arrive yet. I also have a copy of "Cafe Blue" by Patricia Barber on it's way from Amazon.

 

I'm trying out the Eric Dolphy album right now.  


Wow! They are all killer recordings (even the Jeff Beck :beyersmile: ) and a great way to start a real solid collection. Enjoy!

post #216 of 814
Thread Starter 

Thanks, but these aren't my first jazz purchases. I've been buying jazz CD's since I started this thread over a month and a half ago. These are just my most recent additions. I think I have about 30 or so jazz CD's already now. 

 

Edit: I just counted and I have 32 jazz CD's already. 

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by ralphp@optonline View Post
 


Wow! They are all killer recordings (even the Jeff Beck :beyersmile: ) and a great way to start a real solid collection. Enjoy!


Edited by jasonb - 1/21/14 at 6:06pm
post #217 of 814

Not sure how I haven't run across this thread until tonight.  Some really good info contained in these pages for anyone looking to get into jazz.  Like someone said several pages back, getting into jazz can be like learning a new language.  There are so many 'sub-genre's' in jazz that it can be tough to know where to start.  I started playing jazz when I was 13 and it's remained my preferred music of choice.  There is just so much to be had from so many great musicians.

 

I've always preferred the bop/hard-bop style from the 40's-60's.  Fusion and Free Jazz never really clicked with me.  Although I did like a lot of Coleman & Dolphy recordings during the free jazz era.  For the most part though I figured there was enough material that came out of 40's-60's that I didn't need to worry about a lot of the other stuff.  About 4-5 years ago I started listening to some of the more modern jazz and realized I had been missing a lot of good stuff.  I remember a friend played me Friday Afternoon in the Universe by Medeski Martin & Wood back in '96-'97 and I couldn't handle it.  I swore off anything I considered 'modern'...I was so wrong.  Now days I prefer to listen to the likes of The Bad Plus, Medeski Martin & Wood or Esbjorn Svensson Trio over just about anything else.

 

I like a lot of the suggestions listed in this thread for beginners.  There was an outstanding 4 part documentary that came out in 2009 called Icons Among Us: Jazz in the Present Tense.  This documentary will expose you to some great jazz musicians that are not as well known as a lot of people mentioned in this thread that are doing some outstanding things in the world of jazz.  If you get some time it's definitely worth watching all four parts.  I would imagine it can be found on youtube...if not the Documentary Channel and Ovation Channel show these every so often.  

 

Also, someone asked about good female jazz artists...I hadn't seen Melody Gardot mentioned.  I just recently delved into her catalog of work and I am horribly addicted to her voice.

post #218 of 814

Amazon has a pretty decent list of what they consider the top 100 jazz albums - http://www.amazon.com/gp/feature.html?docId=1000371201

 

Obviously any list like this is going to have a lot missing but this is a great list for building a solid jazz foundation.  It has a little of everything...and it's one of the few lists I've seen with Ornette ranked #1 overall.

post #219 of 814
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mingus Ah Um View Post
 

Amazon has a pretty decent list of what they consider the top 100 jazz albums - http://www.amazon.com/gp/feature.html?docId=1000371201

 

Obviously any list like this is going to have a lot missing but this is a great list for building a solid jazz foundation.  It has a little of everything...and it's one of the few lists I've seen with Ornette ranked #1 overall.

Not a bad list. About a third of the jazz I own is on that list. 

post #220 of 814
Quote:
Originally Posted by ralphp@optonline View Post
 


Much of what you wrote applies more to popular music and jazz hasn't been popular music since the late 1940s. Modern day jazz musicians have always had to rely on playing live to make a living. The money they made from record and CD sales was just a nice bonus.

 

However I do I agree that one of things that makes a true artistic genius is the ability to pass the test of time and as great as many contemporary musicians may be, only the passage of time will determine whether they are true geniuses.

 

Agreed. However I was more trying to compare classical composers over history (when there was no format with royalties like the cd/LP etc) with Jazz musicians today. The good ones will stand the test of time, even though it may seem in decline at some point. English is not my native tongue, sorry if it;s a bit vague :D

 

The loss of income in other genres, where releasing a cd could mean large profits in the past, will level the playing field more and more I think. Which is potentially good for jazz and other niche genres. The power of the big 4 is fading already - after they ate up all the 'indies' in the 90's, they now know better and leave the niche for what they are. It's a very interesting time to make a living in the music industry today. 

 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mingus Ah Um View Post
 

  Now days I prefer to listen to the likes of The Bad Plus, Medeski Martin & Wood or Esbjorn Svensson Trio over just about anything else.

Love medeski Martin & Wood. They know how to perform a live show! Seen them live a couple of time, also with scofield.

post #221 of 814
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mingus Ah Um View Post
I hadn't seen Melody Gardot mentioned.  I just recently delved into her catalog of work and I am horribly addicted to her voice.

 

Yup, she has a great voice.  I like to hear the not so well know folks..

post #222 of 814

I don't know what it is about singers, especially female singers, that loosens the definition of jazz but there are more female singers who are just barely "jazz" (using any reasonable criteria) that get lumped into the jazz vocalist category than I care to count. Several of them have already been mentioned in this thread but since I'm making an effect not to go negative I will instead go with the flow and add a few more names to the list.

 

It seems that Europe is just teeming with several very good female singers at the moment. Here are a few of my favorites.

 

In a shout out to durkk over in Den Haag (I lived in Den Haag in 2007/2008 about a kilometer from Scheveningen harbor) here are two very fine Dutch singers.

 

Caro Emerald - The Shocking Miss Emerald


plus Miss Emerald has her own youtube channel:

http://www.youtube.com/user/caroemerald

 

Trijntje Oosterhuis - Strange Fruit

I know the above video is not all that jazzy but the CD shown above is very much jazz.

 

plus one from Belgium:

Lady Linn And Her Magnificent Seven - Here We Go Again

 

Enjoy!

post #223 of 814
Quote:
Originally Posted by ralphp@optonline View Post
 

I don't know what it is about singers, especially female singers, that loosens the definition of jazz but there are more female singers who are just barely "jazz" (using any reasonable criteria) that get lumped into the jazz vocalist category than I care to count. Several of them have already been mentioned in this thread but since I'm making an effect not to go negative I will instead go with the flow and add a few more names to the list.

 

It seems that Europe is just teeming with several very good female singers at the moment. Here are a few of my favorites.

 

In a shout out to durkk over in Den Haag (I lived in Den Haag in 2007/2008 about a kilometer from Scheveningen harbor) here are two very fine Dutch singers.

 

Caro Emerald - The Shocking Miss Emerald

 


plus Miss Emerald has her own youtube channel:

http://www.youtube.com/user/caroemerald

 

Trijntje Oosterhuis - Strange Fruit

 

 

I know the above video is not all that jazzy but the CD shown above is very much jazz.

 

plus one from Belgium:

Lady Linn And Her Magnificent Seven - Here We Go Again

 

 

 

Enjoy!

HA! Hope the city treated you well! I'm just behind the dunes (close to the queens residence). Caro is doing really great, I like the producer too, nice and edgy/fresh.

 

Let me return it with a winter greeting from a norwegian girl with a pretty voice too (also worked with jega jazzis)t: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AmNtuGGyAus

post #224 of 814
Quote:
Originally Posted by durkk View Post
 

HA! Hope the city treated you well! I'm just behind the dunes (close to the queens residence). Caro is doing really great, I like the producer too, nice and edgy/fresh.

 

Let me return it with a winter greeting from a norwegian girl with a pretty voice too (also worked with jega jazzis)t: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AmNtuGGyAus


Thanks for the link to Hanne. I'll try to check some more of her work.

 

Den Haag treated me and my wife very well. I enjoyed my 14 months living in the Netherlands. I especially miss good old Café Cremers on Prinsestraat, my favorite Dutch coffee shop. I also really miss herring mit ui (without broodje) and kibbeling - two of my favorite Dutch snacks.

 

Another one of my favorite Dutch bands is The New Cool Collective. I even got to see them while I was in Den Haag. Benjamin Herman is an excellent alto sax player and I believe that he even studied with the great Jaki Byard, whom I mentioned in an earlier post.

post #225 of 814

Yes, he''s one of the view well known jazz musicians of holland at this time. I can highly recommend Vrije  geluiden, a tv program where he and other dutch jazz musicians play in a very unique setting, for tv anyway :D https://www.youtube.com/user/Vrijegeluiden?feature=watch

 

Another dutch female singer, playing with Eric vloeimans, a good dutch trumpet player, also played with Benjamin Herman on some projects.

 

 


Edited by durkk - 1/22/14 at 12:45pm
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