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On a mission to like jazz - Page 14

post #196 of 463

I'll check out Eddie - Thanks for that.  Already have lots of Dee Dee..:wink_face:

post #197 of 463
Quote:
Originally Posted by ralphp@optonline View Post
 


My father listened to lots of big band jazz. Bennie Goodman, Artie Shaw and Fats Waller, who has yet to be mentioned in this thread, were three of his favorites.

 

 

Oh how could I forget Benny Goodman. He made some great stuff!

 

But being a sax player in high school I've always appreciated saxophonists especially Micheal Brecker, The Brecker Brothers in general, Phil Woods, David Sanborn, Charlie Parker, John Coltrane, and Cannonball Adderly just to name a few. Oh how I love sax music.

post #198 of 463
Quote:
Originally Posted by ralphp@optonline View Post

Very nicely stated. I agree that for the novice jazz listener RYM's listing would be very useful but I can't help but say that it leaves me just scratching my head.

A few jazz sub-genres and some examples of each.

Early jazz, ragtime, dixieland, traditional jazz: Jelly Roll Morton, Eubie Blake, Preservation Hall Jazz Band, Louis Armstrong's Hot Five and Hot Sevens, Sidney Bechet

Big band and small group swing, including the sub-sub-genre of swing song: Count Basie, Duke Ellington, Benny Carter, Ella Fitzgerald, Billie Holiday, Benny Goodman, Artie Shaw

Be-bop: Charlie Parker, Dizzy Gillespie, early Thelonious Monk, Bud Powell

Hard bop: Clifford Brown & Max Roach Quartet, Art Blakey and the Jazz Messengers, the mid 1950s Miles Davis Quintet

Modern Jazz (the term used to refer to jazz from the late 1950s and early 1960s that was NOT either be-bop or hard bop): the late 1950's Miles Davis Quintet (as in the one that recorded "Kind of Blue"), Lennie Tristano, Sonny Rollins, most early 1960s Blue Note recordings, The Dave Brubeck Quartet

Free or avant-garde jazz: Ornette Coleman, Cecil Taylor, The Art Ensemble of Chicago, post 1964 John Coltrane

Contemporary jazz (another catch all term which refers to present day jazz that does not fit into one of the other sub-genres): Dave Douglas, Dave Holland, Charles Lloyd, Keith Jarrett

Smooth jazz: Kenny G and the other artists listed in the above quote.

Fusion: Weather Report, Return to Forever

Vocals: too damn many to list

Remember that these are only very, very broad classifications and lots of jazz recordings and musicians do not fit neatly into any one sub-genre. For example John Coltrane went from be-bop to hard bop to modern jazz to free jazz in the space of about 15 years. Duke Ellington played everything from classic big band jazz to very modern big band jazz to jazz scored for film and religious ceremonies.

Not too sure if I would consider Kenny G jazz in any sense of the word.
It's really pop music for people who don't like jazz but like the idea of liking jazz.
post #199 of 463


I love these recordings, very original pianoplayer (recorded mid 50-'s, who died way to young,

You can clearly hear were Thelonius Monk, for a consideral part,  got his inspiration from..

post #200 of 463
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris J View Post


Not too sure if I would consider Kenny G jazz in any sense of the word.
It's really pop music for people who don't like jazz but like the idea of liking jazz.

 

As I stated in an earlier post I'm doing my very best not to go negative. Sure I don't care for about 99.9999% of all smooth jazz but since I really like free jazz I'm biting my tongue on the smooth jazz posts because then the flame wars start, as in post along the lines of "Cecil Taylor can't play the piano, all he does is bang on the keys" and "Albert Ayler just played noise". So I'm not commenting on any of the artists listed in other member's posts and I hope that that everyone will act the same. What I am trying to do is for every post about smooth jazz to respond with a post about something that is not smooth jazz, without any negative comments. I'm sorry if I am coming off as somewhat preachy but I've seen enough of these types of threads, i.e. threads about music recommendations, to know that once things go negative everything just falls apart.

 

What I would say to someone who likes Kenny G is for them to give a listen to something like this:

 

Ben Webster - See You at the Fair

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Quinto View Post
 


I love these recordings, very original pianoplayer (recorded mid 50-'s, who died way to young,

You can clearly hear were Thelonius Monk, for a consideral part,  got his inspiration from..

I don't know if that is true since Monk started recording a few years before Nichols but their sound is somewhat similar. I would say that they developed their similar styles independent of each other and leave it at that. Another overlooked piano player from around the same time (mid 1950's) was Elmo Hope.

post #201 of 463
Quote:
Originally Posted by ralphp@optonline View Post
 

 

As I stated in an earlier post I'm doing my very best not to go negative. Sure I don't care for about 99.9999% of all smooth jazz but since I really like free jazz I'm biting my tongue on the smooth jazz posts because then the flame wars start, as in post along the lines of "Cecil Taylor can't play the piano, all he does is bang on the keys" and "Albert Ayler just played noise". So I'm not commenting on any of the artists listed in other member's posts and I hope that that everyone will act the same. What I am trying to do is for every post about smooth jazz to respond with a post about something that is not smooth jazz, without any negative comments. I'm sorry if I am coming off as somewhat preachy but I've seen enough of these types of threads, i.e. threads about music recommendations, to know that once things go negative everything just falls apart.

 

What I would say to someone who likes Kenny G is for them to give a listen to something like this:

 

Ben Webster - See You at the Fair

 

 

I don't know if that is true since Monk started recording a few years before Nichols but their sound is somewhat similar. I would say that they developed their similar styles independent of each other and leave it at that. Another overlooked piano player from around the same time (mid 1950's) was Elmo Hope.


You're right about that, Monk was two years older then Nichols..I'm still a Jazz noob, but I'm working on it :D

 

I grew up with the sound of Ben Webster, my father was a huge fan, one of a kind sax player.

 

I'll check out Elmo Hope Trio, cheers!

post #202 of 463
Quote:
Originally Posted by preproman View Post
 

I'll check out Eddie - Thanks for that.  Already have lots of Dee Dee..:wink_face:


Glad to hear that you have already the wonderful Ms. Dee Dee.

 

So let's try:

 

Karrin Allyson - Footprints

 

and here's a selection from this recording:

 

 

By the way, Allyson has quite a few recordings and they are all pretty good. Another one I like is "In Blue"

 


and the recording features a very fine backing band.

post #203 of 463

Hey guys, 

 

I've very recently started to get into jazz for the first time, and this thread has been invaluable in helping me explore this exciting music. I'm looking for some more recommendations - here's a list of my favorites so far: 

Tomasz Stanko

Charles Mingus 

Wayne Shorter

Bill Evans Trio

Marcus Miller 

John Coltrane

 

Thanks! 

post #204 of 463
Quote:
Originally Posted by akong View Post
 

Hey guys, 

 

I've very recently started to get into jazz for the first time, and this thread has been invaluable in helping me explore this exciting music. I'm looking for some more recommendations - here's a list of my favorites so far: 

Tomasz Stanko

Charles Mingus 

Wayne Shorter

Bill Evans Trio

Marcus Miller 

John Coltrane

 

Thanks! 

Some names that come to mind..


-Lee Konitz

-Miles Davis!

-Ahmad Jamal

-Art Pepper

-Cannonball Adderley

-Thelonius Monk

-Coleman Hawkins

-Donald Byrd

-Lenny Breau

-Grant Green

-Jimmy Giuffre

-Keith Jarrett (if you can handle his vocals)

-Kenny Burrel

-Sonny Rollins!

-Stanley Turrentine

 

Good luck!

post #205 of 463
Quote:
Originally Posted by ralphp@optonline View Post

 

As I stated in an earlier post I'm doing my very best not to go negative. Sure I don't care for about 99.9999% of all smooth jazz but since I really like free jazz I'm biting my tongue on the smooth jazz posts because then the flame wars start, as in post along the lines of "Cecil Taylor can't play the piano, all he does is bang on the keys" and "Albert Ayler just played noise". So I'm not commenting on any of the artists listed in other member's posts and I hope that that everyone will act the same. What I am trying to do is for every post about smooth jazz to respond with a post about something that is not smooth jazz, without any negative comments. I'm sorry if I am coming off as somewhat preachy but I've seen enough of these types of threads, i.e. threads about music recommendations, to know that once things go negative everything just falls apart.

 

What I would say to someone who likes Kenny G is for them to give a listen to something like this:

 

Ben Webster - See You at the Fair

 

 

I don't know if that is true since Monk started recording a few years before Nichols but their sound is somewhat similar. I would say that they developed their similar styles independent of each other and leave it at that. Another overlooked piano player from around the same time (mid 1950's) was Elmo Hope.

 



Not to disrespect anyone, I haven't found the time to read all the posts in this thread.
I just don't have the time.
It is a an interesting thread, though!

I suppose you do have a point with Kenny G............................I will do my best to bite my tongue when it comes to "Smooth Jazz".
post #206 of 463

Y'know, over the years I've seen a number  of 'Jazz appreciation' on various websites.  While there's always exceptions, invariably, the majority of the recs are for music from the past.  While I own, respect, and love so much Jazz from days gone by, I'm always left feeling that a true disservice is being done to artists who are living the life and creating great music TODAY.  I firmly believe, and this pertains to other music besides Jazz as well, there's music that goes underappreciated simply due to not having been done in the right 'time' period.  In other words, if it HAD been created back in the day, it might have much more historical significance.  Players that will never have the name recognition of a Coltrane, Rollins, etc. but are equal in ability and artistic significance.  I hope I'm making some kind of sense. 

 

I'm trying to make this point HERE because Head-Fi is one of the few sites (audiophile or music) where I see substantial traffic primarily by young(ish) posters.  I think it's important that young music-lover's don't get the impression that Jazz is a music for old-timers.  I know I've always had this feeling about Classical, and the declining number of working symphony orchestras worldwide suggests I'm not alone, I've read that there's great concern for the future of Classical music in the generations to come.  I worry that Jazz may suffer from the same kind of misconception.  Jazz has always been a hard sell.  Let's face it, it's advanced musicology!  Historically, the Jazz musicians life has always been difficult.  Today it's even harder. In all music, it's not enough to simply play great music.  Business and self-marketing play a huge part so I feel while it's certainly rewarding, important, and even essential, to appreciate what's come before, we should also celebrate what's happening NOW.

 

I also feel making lists with dozens of artists can be a form of information overload.  To the person making the list it's perfectly logical but I imagine it could be too much for a person not familiar with the genre.  In this spirit I'll make a recommendation of one artist who I consider to be one of the greats of our time.  Anat Cohen.  I 1st heard her on the 'WAVERLY SEVEN' record (strongly recommended).  From that record I got into her bandmates, who are equally amazing players, and her tremendous record label; Anzic.  Today I own many Anat Cohen recordings and records where she's a sideman.  I also own records by many of her bandmates and many records recorded by the Anzic record company.  And it all started by picking up a used copy of the Waverly Seven from a used CD shop!  IMO, if Anat Cohen was a recording artist in the '50's she'd be as historically significant as any of the greats from that era!  Check her out on Youtube, she's truly a force to be reckoned with!  

 

Sorry for the rant, hope I didn't bore TOO many of you!;)    

post #207 of 463

Um, I've seen a lot of posts in this thread containing new artists that are alive and well and still cranking out music.

post #208 of 463
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hijodelbrx View Post

Y'know, over the years I've seen a number  of 'Jazz appreciation' on various websites.  While there's always exceptions, invariably, the majority of the recs are for music from the past.  While I own, respect, and love so much Jazz from days gone by, I'm always left feeling that a true disservice is being done to artists who are living the life and creating great music TODAY.  I firmly believe, and this pertains to other music besides Jazz as well, there's music that goes underappreciated simply due to not having been done in the right 'time' period.  In other words, if it HAD been created back in the day, it might have much more historical significance.  Players that will never have the name recognition of a Coltrane, Rollins, etc. but are equal in ability and artistic significance.  I hope I'm making some kind of sense. 

I'm trying to make this point HERE because Head-Fi is one of the few sites (audiophile or music) where I see substantial traffic primarily by young(ish) posters.  I think it's important that young music-lover's don't get the impression that Jazz is a music for old-timers.  I know I've always had this feeling about Classical, and the declining number of working symphony orchestras worldwide suggests I'm not alone, I've read that there's great concern for the future of Classical music in the generations to come.  I worry that Jazz may suffer from the same kind of misconception.  Jazz has always been a hard sell.  Let's face it, it's advanced musicology!  Historically, the Jazz musicians life has always been difficult.  Today it's even harder. In all music, it's not enough to simply play great music.  Business and self-marketing play a huge part so I feel while it's certainly rewarding, important, and even essential, to appreciate what's come before, we should also celebrate what's happening NOW.

I also feel making lists with dozens of artists can be a form of information overload.  To the person making the list it's perfectly logical but I imagine it could be too much for a person not familiar with the genre.  In this spirit I'll make a recommendation of one artist who I consider to be one of the greats of our time.  Anat Cohen.  I 1st heard her on the 'WAVERLY SEVEN' record (strongly recommended).  From that record I got into her bandmates, who are equally amazing players, and her tremendous record label; Anzic.  Today I own many Anat Cohen recordings and records where she's a sideman.  I also own records by many of her bandmates and many records recorded by the Anzic record company.  And it all started by picking up a used copy of the Waverly Seven from a used CD shop!  IMO, if Anat Cohen was a recording artist in the '50's she'd be as historically significant as any of the greats from that era!  Check her out on Youtube, she's truly a force to be reckoned with!  

Sorry for the rant, hope I didn't bore TOO many of you!wink.gif    

For all you hipsters,
Some fresh new jams:

Terence Blanchard........Magnetic
Jane Monheit...............The Heart Of The Matter, Home
Roy Hargrove.................Emergence, Ear Food

Can you dig it?
Edited by Chris J - 1/21/14 at 3:17pm
post #209 of 463
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hijodelbrx View Post
 

Y'know, over the years I've seen a number  of 'Jazz appreciation' on various websites.  While there's always exceptions, invariably, the majority of the recs are for music from the past.  While I own, respect, and love so much Jazz from days gone by, I'm always left feeling that a true disservice is being done to artists who are living the life and creating great music TODAY.  I firmly believe, and this pertains to other music besides Jazz as well, there's music that goes underappreciated simply due to not having been done in the right 'time' period.  In other words, if it HAD been created back in the day, it might have much more historical significance.  Players that will never have the name recognition of a Coltrane, Rollins, etc. but are equal in ability and artistic significance.  I hope I'm making some kind of sense. 

 

I'm trying to make this point HERE because Head-Fi is one of the few sites (audiophile or music) where I see substantial traffic primarily by young(ish) posters.  I think it's important that young music-lover's don't get the impression that Jazz is a music for old-timers.  I know I've always had this feeling about Classical, and the declining number of working symphony orchestras worldwide suggests I'm not alone, I've read that there's great concern for the future of Classical music in the generations to come.  I worry that Jazz may suffer from the same kind of misconception.  Jazz has always been a hard sell.  Let's face it, it's advanced musicology!  Historically, the Jazz musicians life has always been difficult.  Today it's even harder. In all music, it's not enough to simply play great music.  Business and self-marketing play a huge part so I feel while it's certainly rewarding, important, and even essential, to appreciate what's come before, we should also celebrate what's happening NOW.

 

I also feel making lists with dozens of artists can be a form of information overload.  To the person making the list it's perfectly logical but I imagine it could be too much for a person not familiar with the genre.  In this spirit I'll make a recommendation of one artist who I consider to be one of the greats of our time.  Anat Cohen.  I 1st heard her on the 'WAVERLY SEVEN' record (strongly recommended).  From that record I got into her bandmates, who are equally amazing players, and her tremendous record label; Anzic.  Today I own many Anat Cohen recordings and records where she's a sideman.  I also own records by many of her bandmates and many records recorded by the Anzic record company.  And it all started by picking up a used copy of the Waverly Seven from a used CD shop!  IMO, if Anat Cohen was a recording artist in the '50's she'd be as historically significant as any of the greats from that era!  Check her out on Youtube, she's truly a force to be reckoned with!  

 

Sorry for the rant, hope I didn't bore TOO many of you!;)    


I believe that I said something very similar back in post #138 (http://www.head-fi.org/t/693212/on-a-mission-to-like-jazz/135#post_10158105) and included a list of over 15 current musicians/recordings to help get the new jazz listener started. Sure I also like to give recommendations for older jazz musicians and recordings but that's only because I really enjoy just about all of jazz's many sub-genres and because I also enjoy writing about the history of jazz. So for example while you can listen to enjoy the artist you mention, Anat Cohen, who plays clarinet, without knowing anything about the history of the clarinet in jazz, I feel that to truly understand and better appreciate Ms. Cohen's playing and her place in jazz history you should try listening to some of the other great clarinet players who came before her.

 

Here are a few to get you started.

 

Alvin Batiste - Late - a truly fantastic recording and one of jazz's many, many overlooked classics.

 

John Carter & Bobby Bradford - Mosaic Select #36 (which contains the album "Seeking")

 

John Carter - Fields

 

And finally Horace Tapscott - The Dark Tree - another grossly overlooked classic on which John Carter is featured. So overlooked that AMG (all Music Guide) doesn't even give it a full review. Very highly recommended.

post #210 of 463
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris J View Post


For all you hipsters,
Some fresh new jams:

Terence Blanchard........Magnetic
Jane Monheit...............The Heart Of The Matter, Home
Roy Hargrove.................Emergence, Ear Food

Can you dig it?


Sorry about the quick posts but this was posted while I writing my previous post.

 

Add to that list:

 

Trombone Shorty's latest release "Say That To This"

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