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On a mission to like jazz - Page 11

post #151 of 2140
Quote:
Originally Posted by WNBC View Post
Quite a list here.  I have a soft spot for pianists and time to listen to more people than just Keith Jarrett :) 

Thanks and that's only the very tip of the iceberg. For example here are few first rate piano players who have not yet been mentioned.

 

The late great Jaki Byard, who played with Mingus in the early and mid 1960s. For a fine example of his group work check out "The Jaki Byard Quartet Live!" a fantastic live (duh!) date from 1965 which is one of jazz's real hidden gems. One of my all time favorite live recordings of anyone. Among is solo recordings the best one is "There'll Be Some Changes Made" from late 1972 and which has not been reissues on CD (boo! hiss!).

 

Another deceased piano giant is Mal Waldron, who like Byard, excelled in both group and solo settings. There are some many great Mal Waldron recordings that I have no idea where to start. Waldron had a very long career starting in the mid 1950s and going strong until his passing in 2002. His early work in the 1950s is more straight ahead but with the unique Waldron style peeking through. His mid 1980s group and solo recordings are all worthwhile.

 

Now on to the living. I don't think that Geri Allen has been mentioned. Give her 2004 recording "The Life of a Song" on Telarc a listen. I also recommend her latest recording "Grand River Crossings: Motown & Motor City Inspirations" and "Zodiac Suite: Revisited" by a trio called The Mary Lou Williams Collective featuring Allen along with bassist Buster Williams and drummers Billy Hart or Andrew Cyrille. This recording is a "bonus" disc since you get to hear Geri Allen very skilfully playing one of Mary Lou Williams most ambitions and successful compositions.

 

For those of you unfamiliar with any of these great pianists well then you are in for a real treat and for those of you who are familiar with their music it's time to get reacquainted with their greatness.

post #152 of 2140

I seriously love this album:

Maybe a bit different from all the other acts here :)

But my one and only true love will always be Mr. Charles Tolliver and his Big Band.


I'm always open for some suggestions! While I've been listening to Jazz for maybe over a year now, I haven't really acquired a good overview the genre so far.
 

post #153 of 2140
Quote:
Originally Posted by ralphp@optonline View Post
 

Thanks and that's only the very tip of the iceberg. For example here are few first rate piano players who have not yet been mentioned.

 

The late great Jaki Byard, who played with Mingus in the early and mid 1960s. For a fine example of his group work check out "The Jaki Byard Quartet Live!" a fantastic live (duh!) date from 1965 which is one of jazz's real hidden gems. One of my all time favorite live recordings of anyone. Among is solo recordings the best one is "There'll Be Some Changes Made" from late 1972 and which has not been reissues on CD (boo! hiss!).

 

Another deceased piano giant is Mal Waldron, who like Byard, excelled in both group and solo settings. There are some many great Mal Waldron recordings that I have no idea where to start. Waldron had a very long career starting in the mid 1950s and going strong until his passing in 2002. His early work in the 1950s is more straight ahead but with the unique Waldron style peeking through. His mid 1980s group and solo recordings are all worthwhile.

 

Now on to the living. I don't think that Geri Allen has been mentioned. Give her 2004 recording "The Life of a Song" on Telarc a listen. I also recommend her latest recording "Grand River Crossings: Motown & Motor City Inspirations" and "Zodiac Suite: Revisited" by a trio called The Mary Lou Williams Collective featuring Allen along with bassist Buster Williams and drummers Billy Hart or Andrew Cyrille. This recording is a "bonus" disc since you get to hear Geri Allen very skilfully playing one of Mary Lou Williams most ambitions and successful compositions.

 

For those of you unfamiliar with any of these great pianists well then you are in for a real treat and for those of you who are familiar with their music it's time to get reacquainted with their greatness.

I really need to check out those waldron albums. piano players - don't get me started. ;) I always liked oscar ¬ 

 

 

All 4 parts of the interview are there on youtube. Also like Gonzallo Rubalcabo ¬

 

 


Edited by magiccabbage - 1/14/14 at 3:23am
post #154 of 2140
Quote:
Originally Posted by magiccabbage View Post
 

I really need to check out those waldron albums. piano players - don't get me started. ;) I always liked oscar ¬ 

 

 

 

All 4 parts of the interview are there on youtube. Also like Gonzallo Rubalcabo ¬

 

 

A few words of caution: Mal Waldron is the polar opposite of Oscar Peterson and Gonzallo Rubalcabo in that while Peterson and Rubalcabo are very "busy" players, by which I mean that they to play lots and lots of notes, and their sound is somewhat dense. Waldron plays much more sparsely. Minimalist approach versus the busy approach. I'm not passing judgement on either approach, I'm just trying to point out the differences. Either approach is equally valid and I enjoy both.

 

Now Jaki Byard played any and all styles with equal ability and lots of verve.

post #155 of 2140

post #156 of 2140
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Yum Goong View Post
 

I seriously love this album:

Maybe a bit different from all the other acts here :)

But my one and only true love will always be Mr. Charles Tolliver and his Big Band.


I'm always open for some suggestions! While I've been listening to Jazz for maybe over a year now, I haven't really acquired a good overview the genre so far.
 

Only listening to jazz for about a year and yet you stumbled upon Charles Tolliver and his Big Band. I'm impressed and blown away by this since Tolliver is not someone I think of when I think about artists that a "new" jazz listener would be familar with. Miles Davis, Bill Evans, Monk, Rollins and many of the other artists aready mentioned in this thread but not Tolliver. Anyway I'm glad you are enjoying Tolliver's music and with that music in mind I'd like to give you a couple of suggestions that you might enjoy.

 

So far big band jazz has barely been mentioned. Here are artists who would be assoicated with big band who have been mentioned thus far:

 

Billie Holiday, Charles Mingus, Count Basie, Duke Ellington, Louis Armstrong, Buddy Rich, Woody Herman, hr Big Band, Miles Davis with Gil Evans

 

Aside from the hr Big Band none of these artists can be seen live since they are all long dead. Here are a few more contempory big bands worth checking out.

 

The Vienna Art Orchestra - lots of recordings to choose from however I would start with this one:

The Minimalism of Erik Satie

 

Gerald Wilson Orchestra - Legacy

 

Mingus Big Band - Live at Jazz Standard

 

As for those those musicians no longer with us, here are a few more suggestions:

 

Duke Ellington - The Blanton-Webster Band

 

Count Basie - The Complete Decca Recordings

 

I also what to say that I am very pleased with the way everyone is behaving themselves on this thread. So far there have been no negative posts of any kind. By that I mean post along the lines of "I hate free jazz! It's just a lot of noise" or "Smooth jazz really sucks". While I am not a fan of smooth jazz I think that members who enjoy smooth jazz should be able to post their suggestions since, who knows maybe someone else will also enjoy the music. And of course the same can be said for my free jazz suggestions. Not everyone is going is going to like everything but one thing I do know is that negative posts are not helpful. So thank you everyone for keeping this thread positive!

post #157 of 2140

The more I listen to Dave Wekl the more I like him. His band is great, not a weakling amongst them. I'm listening to this right now, through HE-500's. Saaweeet.

 

post #158 of 2140
Quote:
Originally Posted by StanD View Post
 

The more I listen to Dave Wekl the more I like him. His band is great, not a weakling amongst them. I'm listening to this right now, through HE-500's. Saaweeet.

 

 

Love it..

post #159 of 2140
Dave Weckl's a straight up MONSTA!wink.gif. I must easily own over 30+ recordings with him on them. I really enjoy his versatility. Although primarily known as a Fusion Jazz player he's well-versed in Brazil Jazz (Tania Maria), Latin Jazz (Michel Camilo, Paquito D'Rivera), he's also a very fine straight ahead 'standard' Jazz player as evidenced by the excellent Chick Corea 'Akoustic Band' recordings! Coming full circle he's also an amazing Big Band drummer! He recorded 3 stunning records with the GRP All-Star Big Band (listening to my favorite; All Blues, as I type!). This stellar band also was featured on Dave Grusin's very fine tribute records to Duke Ellington, George Gershwin, & West Side Story! DW's recently been featured on bassist Tom Kennedy and Randy Brecker's latest records and I'm looking forward to his new solo reportedly being released very soon! Yeah, guess you can say I'm a fan!wink.gif
post #160 of 2140
Quote:
Originally Posted by ralphp@optonline View Post
 

Only listening to jazz for about a year and yet you stumbled upon Charles Tolliver and his Big Band. I'm impressed and blown away by this since Tolliver is not someone I think of when I think about artists that a "new" jazz listener would be familar with. Miles Davis, Bill Evans, Monk, Rollins and many of the other artists aready mentioned in this thread but not Tolliver. Anyway I'm glad you are enjoying Tolliver's music and with that music in mind I'd like to give you a couple of suggestions that you might enjoy.

 

So far big band jazz has barely been mentioned. Here are artists who would be assoicated with big band who have been mentioned thus far:

 

Billie Holiday, Charles Mingus, Count Basie, Duke Ellington, Louis Armstrong, Buddy Rich, Woody Herman, hr Big Band, Miles Davis with Gil Evans

 

Aside from the hr Big Band none of these artists can be seen live since they are all long dead. Here are a few more contempory big bands worth checking out.

 

*snip*
 

I also what to say that I am very pleased with the way everyone is behaving themselves on this thread. So far there have been no negative posts of any kind. By that I mean post along the lines of "I hate free jazz! It's just a lot of noise" or "Smooth jazz really sucks". While I am not a fan of smooth jazz I think that members who enjoy smooth jazz should be able to post their suggestions since, who knows maybe someone else will also enjoy the music. And of course the same can be said for my free jazz suggestions. Not everyone is going is going to like everything but one thing I do know is that negative posts are not helpful. So thank you everyone for keeping this thread positive!

Oh wow, thanks for all the suggestions!
This sure will keep me busy for the rest of the weekend :)

I'm also really enjoying Herbie Hancocks music and old-ish Swing like the Rat Pack.





Vocals in Swing are totally fine by me, but besides that I honestly prefer instrumental music.

post #161 of 2140
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hijodelbrx View Post

Dave Weckl's a straight up MONSTA!wink.gif. I must easily own over 30+ recordings with him on them. I really enjoy his versatility. Although primarily known as a Fusion Jazz player he's well-versed in Brazil Jazz (Tania Maria), Latin Jazz (Michel Camilo, Paquito D'Rivera), he's also a very fine straight ahead 'standard' Jazz player as evidenced by the excellent Chick Corea 'Akoustic Band' recordings! Coming full circle he's also an amazing Big Band drummer! He recorded 3 stunning records with the GRP All-Star Big Band (listening to my favorite; All Blues, as I type!). This stellar band also was featured on Dave Grusin's very fine tribute records to Duke Ellington, George Gershwin, & West Side Story! DW's recently been featured on bassist Tom Kennedy and Randy Brecker's latest records and I'm looking forward to his new solo reportedly being released very soon! Yeah, guess you can say I'm a fan!wink.gif

He's easy to like. I have never heard anything less than excellent with his name on it. A true talent.

post #162 of 2140

Yea, Weckl is in the top 5 among over 100 bands I have seen in my days.   He's SO versatile.  Makes it look so easy too.

 

The other point a few posts above about smooth jazz, while I don't care for it, the players are equally talented.  Many started out playing straight ahead or fusion and went smooth just to make a living so they could still play music.  Sax player Eric Marienthal is a good example.   He's a bigtime smooth jazzer but many may not realize he  absolutely tore it up in Chick Corea's Elektric Band 25 years ago as a session guy.


Edited by Spyro - 1/18/14 at 3:54pm
post #163 of 2140
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spyro View Post
 

Yea, Weckl is in the top 5 among over 100 bands I have seen in my days.   He's SO versatile.  Makes it look so easy too.

 

The other point a few posts above about smooth jazz, while I don't care for it, the players are equally talented.  Many started out playing straight ahead or fusion and went smooth just to make a living so they could still play music.  Sax player Eric Marienthal is a good example.   He's a bigtime smooth jazzer but many may not realize he  absolutely tore it up in Chick Corea's Elektric Band 25 years ago as a session guy.

I used to work in the music industry and got to personally know many of the top fusion jazz players of the 1970's and others. They had to tour in Europe to make a living as jazz was not getting the attention that it deserved back home where it was born. Also many of the top fusion players were European. I asked Roy Ayers, "How come you've been doing some disco?" and he replied, "A man's got to eat."

post #164 of 2140
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spyro View Post
 

Yea, Weckl is in the top 5 among over 100 bands I have seen in my days.   He's SO versatile.  Makes it look so easy too.

 

The other point a few posts above about smooth jazz, while I don't care for it, the players are equally talented.  Many started out playing straight ahead or fusion and went smooth just to make a living so they could still play music.  Sax player Eric Marienthal is a good example.   He's a bigtime smooth jazzer but many may not realize he  absolutely tore it up in Chick Corea's Elektric Band 25 years ago as a session guy.

 

Would be interesting to know your top 5 Jazz Fusion bands / players

post #165 of 2140
Quote:
Originally Posted by preproman View Post
 

 

Would be interesting to know your top 5 Jazz Fusion bands / players

+1

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