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On a mission to like jazz - Page 10

post #136 of 2140
Quote:
Originally Posted by SlimShadyMJ View Post

Art Blakey- moanin

I actually got introduced to jazz through an anime (kids on the slope - watch it, its good) and this was the first jazz tune to ever stick with me.. I absolutely love it. Like you, I'm also trying to get into Jazz and expand on my musical tastes.


 

Yeah...great tune!
post #137 of 2140
Quote:
Originally Posted by SlimShadyMJ View Post
 

Art Blakey- moanin

 

I actually got introduced to jazz through an anime (kids on the slope - watch it, its good) and this was the first jazz tune to ever stick with me.. I absolutely love it. Like you, I'm also trying to get into Jazz and expand on my musical tastes.

 

 

Wonderful stuff - thanks for the link - has made me rush and download the album, so big cheers to you!

post #138 of 2140

This morning I took to the time to actually read this thread from the very beginning and I must say this is turning into one killer "jazz primer" thread. What I really fine striking is how similar TJ Elite's advice is to what I would say. For example in post #67 TJ wrote "It's kind of like learning a new language actually" which perfectly mirrors an essay I wrote back in collage (when I was first discovering jazz) where I say that discovering was like learning a new language as opposed to rock music where each recording was like learning a new word in a language I already spoke.

So with the above in mind I'd like to add some additional advice and comments.

 

One of the pitfalls of these kind of recommendation threads about jazz is that many of the great and important jazz recordings where made many years ago and most of the artists involved are no longer living. While this does not detract from the greatness of these classic recordings it does means that it is no longer to possible to see these musicians perform live and one jazz's greatest features is the making of great music on the spur of the moment in a live setting.

 

One of the best ways for new jazz listeners to learn about this wonderful music is to experience it's creation in a live concert so with that mind I've compiled a list (which is by no means definitive) of some contemporary musicians and some of their newer recordings. Please try to give a least a few of these recordings a listen and if you have the change please GO and SEE and HEAR these musicians and their groups LIVE.

 

Rudresh Mahanthappa - Gamak

 

Vijay Iyer Trio - Accelerando (2012) - along with Rudresh Mahanthappa, Iyer represents a new and powerful force in modern jazz, mainly that of musicians coming from totally different cultural backgrounds then the more "traditional" jazz musicians and fully incorporating their ethnic backgrounds into the music to create some really new and very intriguing jazz.

 

Mostly Other People Do the Killing - Slippery Rock (2012) - quite possibly the most exciting group of the past five years.

 

The Vandermark 5 - Single Piece Flow (while the Vandermark 5 is no longer playing, Ken Vandermark is still going strong and is always playing new and exciting music)

 

Myra Melford - Life Carries Me This Way (2013) her latest recording and just the tip of the iceberg.

 

Dave Douglas Quintet -  Time Travel (2013) his latest recording and like Melford just the tip of the iceberg.

 

Jason Moran - Ten (another great young pianist)

 

Charles Lloyd Quartet - Mirror (the great Charles Lloyd's latest recording in a long career filled with outstanding recordings)

 

Enrico Rava Quintet - Tribe (the great Italian trumpeter's latest recording)

 

Yo Miles! - Yo Miles! (mind blowing reimagining and updating of Miles Davis' early 1970's electric period)

 

Wadada Leo Smith's Organic - Heart's Reflections (Smith, who is one of the co-leaders of Yo Miles!, takes jazz to entirely new places by mixing the sound of Yo Miles! with that his more acoustic groups, such the Golden Quartet listed below. One of the best recordings of the past seferal years.)

 

Wadada Leo Smith's Golden Quartet

 

Jewels & Binoculars - Jewels & Binoculars: The Music of Bob Dylan (their version of "Visions of Johanna" is amazing!)

 

DJ Spooky - Optometry (another genre bending and boundary expanding recording)

 

Branford Marsalis Quartet - Four MFs Playin' Tunes

 

Christian McBride Trio - Out Here

 

Wayne Shorter Quartet - Without a Net Wayne Shorter is getting on in years but still going strong, I recommend going out and seeing this great quartet before it's too late)

 

Matthew Shipp - Piano Sutras (2013) (my favorite living jazz pianist)

 


Slightly older but still excellent:

 

The George Adams / Don Pullen Quartet (my favorite jazz group of the 1980s and Don Pullen remains my all time favorite jazz pianist)

 

Masada (John Zorn's great quartet was easily my favorite jazz group of the 1990s into the early 2000s)

 

Enjoy and please try to see some LIVE jazz!

post #139 of 2140

@ralphp@optonline

 

Thanks for this massive list, will check them out asap :)

post #140 of 2140

Great post Ralphp!

 

This album made me trip yesterday evening :D

 

post #141 of 2140
Quote:
Originally Posted by ralphp@optonline View Post
 

This morning I took to the time to actually read this thread from the very beginning and I must say this is turning into one killer "jazz primer" thread. What I really fine striking is how similar TJ Elite's advice is to what I would say. For example in post #67 TJ wrote "It's kind of like learning a new language actually" which perfectly mirrors an essay I wrote back in collage (when I was first discovering jazz) where I say that discovering was like learning a new language as opposed to rock music where each recording was like learning a new word in a language I already spoke.

So with the above in mind I'd like to add some additional advice and comments.

 

One of the pitfalls of these kind of recommendation threads about jazz is that many of the great and important jazz recordings where made many years ago and most of the artists involved are no longer living. While this does not detract from the greatness of these classic recordings it does means that it is no longer to possible to see these musicians perform live and one jazz's greatest features is the making of great music on the spur of the moment in a live setting.

 

One of the best ways for new jazz listeners to learn about this wonderful music is to experience it's creation in a live concert so with that mind I've compiled a list (which is by no means definitive) of some contemporary musicians and some of their newer recordings. Please try to give a least a few of these recordings a listen and if you have the change please GO and SEE and HEAR these musicians and their groups LIVE.

 

Rudresh Mahanthappa - Gamak

 

Vijay Iyer Trio - Accelerando (2012) - along with Rudresh Mahanthappa, Iyer represents a new and powerful force in modern jazz, mainly that of musicians coming from totally different cultural backgrounds then the more "traditional" jazz musicians and fully incorporating their ethnic backgrounds into the music to create some really new and very intriguing jazz.

 

 

Masada (John Zorn's great quartet was easily my favorite jazz group of the 1990s into the early 2000s)

 

Enjoy and please try to see some LIVE jazz!

You mention many good things in your post. Thanks for taking the time to compose it.

 

Of your long list, I just wanted to comment on a couple. Mahanthappa's Gamak I got in the mail earlier this week (along with five other CDs from ACT's Christmas sale) but haven't yet had the time to listen to it. I expect great things from it based on what little I've heard of it and Rudresh's other music. Accelerando actually happens to be on my wish list. I was on the fence about it initially, but after giving it a quick preview on Spotify I must say I was intrigued halfway through the second track so I will definitely be picking it up in the near future. And lastly Masada is a group I can also recommend. Their music might be a bit of a challenge for a jazz novice, but then again most of the exceptional music I've heard requires active effort from the listener's part to learn to appreciate.

post #142 of 2140
Subbing from phone to read later.

Anyone got some quick recommendations for me, the jazz I like is not the busy fast type but more like Time Out or Kind of Blue. I've listened to a few of the other big names from the past but wasnt really a fan.
post #143 of 2140
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quinto View Post
 

Great post Ralphp!

 

This album made me trip yesterday evening :D

 

im a shorter fan, but have never heard the album. Good? Whats it like? 

post #144 of 2140
Quote:
Originally Posted by TJ Elite View Post
 

You mention many good things in your post. Thanks for taking the time to compose it.

 

Of your long list, I just wanted to comment on a couple. Mahanthappa's Gamak I got in the mail earlier this week (along with five other CDs from ACT's Christmas sale) but haven't yet had the time to listen to it. I expect great things from it based on what little I've heard of it and Rudresh's other music. Accelerando actually happens to be on my wish list. I was on the fence about it initially, but after giving it a quick preview on Spotify I must say I was intrigued halfway through the second track so I will definitely be picking it up in the near future. And lastly Masada is a group I can also recommend. Their music might be a bit of a challenge for a jazz novice, but then again most of the exceptional music I've heard requires active effort from the listener's part to learn to appreciate.


Thank you TJ!

 

I've been a jazz fanatic for well over 40 years and I've been most fortunate for having had the chance to see many great jazz greats perform in many different settings (it really helps that I live in the greater New York City area and, despite what many people may think, New York City was and is the jazz capitol of the world). I've always been willing to share my love and knowledge of jazz to anyone willing to listen.

 

While I only listed the Masada quartet, there are many other equally worthwhile incarnations of John Zorn's Masada musical world, by that I mean what Zorn refers to as the Masada Book which is music that he composed based on traditional Jewish music in a modern jazz style. For example:

 

Electric Masada (Masada with a definite rock music electric guitar edge)

 

Masada String Trio - a chamber music approach

 

Bar Kokhba - a beautiful mix of the classic Masada quartet with the chamber and world music elements added.

 

And the various recordings of different musicians and ensembles playing the Masada book. e.g. various The Book of Angels recordings.

post #145 of 2140
Quote:
Originally Posted by magiccabbage View Post
 

im a shorter fan, but have never heard the album. Good? Whats it like? 


Simply put: the state of the art for what a modern jazz quartet should sound like. In other words, group playing, soloing and compositions of the very highest caliber.

post #146 of 2140
Quote:
Originally Posted by caracara08 View Post

Subbing from phone to read later.

Anyone got some quick recommendations for me, the jazz I like is not the busy fast type but more like Time Out or Kind of Blue. I've listened to a few of the other big names from the past but wasnt really a fan.


Here's one for you:

 

Tomasz Stanko Quartet - The Soul of Things (2002)

 

post #147 of 2140

Great advice!  Seeing and hearing Avishai Cohen trio really increased my appreciation for this band.  I need to get out more though.  Bands I would like to hear live are Tord Gustavsen and Helge Lien. 

 

Quite a list here.  I have a soft spot for pianists and time to listen to more people than just Keith Jarrett :) 

 

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by ralphp@optonline View Post
 

One of the best ways for new jazz listeners to learn about this wonderful music is to experience it's creation in a live concert so with that mind I've compiled a list (which is by no means definitive) of some contemporary musicians and some of their newer recordings. Please try to give a least a few of these recordings a listen and if you have the change please GO and SEE and HEAR these musicians and their groups LIVE.

 

Matthew Shipp - Piano Sutras (2013) (my favorite living jazz pianist)

 

The George Adams / Don Pullen Quartet (my favorite jazz group of the 1980s and Don Pullen remains my all time favorite jazz pianist)

 

Enjoy and please try to see some LIVE jazz!

post #148 of 2140
Quote:
Originally Posted by magiccabbage View Post
 

im a shorter fan, but have never heard the album. Good? Whats it like? 


It really is one of those rare albums where all falls into place and the magic starts..

 

if you'll click you're in for a treat :D 

 


Edited by Quinto - 1/12/14 at 8:59am
post #149 of 2140
Quote:
Originally Posted by ralphp@optonline View Post
 


Here's one for you:

 

Tomasz Stanko Quartet - The Soul of Things (2002)

 

 

thank you! ill check them out.

post #150 of 2140
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lostinspace View Post
 

 

Wonderful stuff - thanks for the link - has made me rush and download the album, so big cheers to you!

Haha happy to help. And thanks. 

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