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post #376 of 679
Quote:
Originally Posted by xaddictionx View Post


Yea we all hear differently. ūüėČ

 

G08.jpg

It'll be nice if more reviewers can describe more specifically which part of Bass, Mids or Treble they are refering to.

post #377 of 679
Thread Starter 
Perhaps, but I have found that few professional reviewers attempt to dissect the sound as such. smily_headphones1.gif
post #378 of 679

Man, I just want to talk about how much I'm liking these headphones. I think the sound stage on these is pretty remarkable, especially when something is recorded really well. They have so much space and width, which allows for really good separation and clarity despite the beefy and warm sound signature. I hear a lot of details I never heard with the FXT90s, and the overall presentation is bigger and more life-like. The bass has tamed quite a lot and now everything has a wonderfully natural timbre. Whereas initially I found the bass to be too overpowering for classical, it is no longer a problem at all, everything comes across clearly and naturally.

 

I think another testament to the quality of these headphones is that now I notice a huge difference between my lossless files and the lower quality ones I put in my computer before getting into high quality sound. With the FXT90s I could kind of notice a difference but it wasn't huge. With these, since the difference is so big I find it really difficult to listen to the low res files because they don't deliver the quality I'm used to anymore.

 

For what they deliver, the price is really amazing.

 

Really the only thing lacking with these is the isolation, but I think I still haven't found the right tips.

 

I would recommend these to anyone.

post #379 of 679
Quote:
Originally Posted by delmonte View Post
 

Man, I just want to talk about how much I'm liking these headphones. I think the sound stage on these is pretty remarkable, especially when something is recorded really well. They have so much space and width, which allows for really good separation and clarity despite the beefy and warm sound signature. I hear a lot of details I never heard with the FXT90s, and the overall presentation is bigger and more life-like. The bass has tamed quite a lot and now everything has a wonderfully natural timbre. Whereas initially I found the bass to be too overpowering for classical, it is no longer a problem at all, everything comes across clearly and naturally.

 

I think another testament to the quality of these headphones is that now I notice a huge difference between my lossless files and the lower quality ones I put in my computer before getting into high quality sound. With the FXT90s I could kind of notice a difference but it wasn't huge. With these, since the difference is so big I find it really difficult to listen to the low res files because they don't deliver the quality I'm used to anymore.

 

For what they deliver, the price is really amazing.

 

Really the only thing lacking with these is the isolation, but I think I still haven't found the right tips.

 

I would recommend these to anyone.

 

I see you are a violin player like me :) I wonder how are these at presenting violin passages in complex classical pieces.

post #380 of 679
Quote:
Originally Posted by ozkan View Post
 

 

I see you are a violin player like me :) I wonder how are these at presenting violin passages in complex classical pieces.


I will write out some detailed impressions with specific examples for violin a bit later. Right now I will say that before burn-in these were absolutely awful for violin and as a violinist it was disappointing. Now they have improved a lot and in general are really good. There may still be a slight veil on violin, but I'm not really sure... that could depend on the recording. I'll address that later. 

 

I will say that specifically with symphonies, where you have a whole violin section as opposed to a solo, they sound fantastic now. In the beginning I swear, it's as if they weren't there. All I heard was a soup of bass and absolutely no articulation or brilliance in the violins. Interestingly, the upper woodwinds (flute, oboe) sounded okay, but not the violins. But now, the bass no longer overpowers them and they are up front with a lot of power and warmth but articulation and clarity as well. And the bass continues to hit hard and deep, but in its right place.

 

Violin solos and more importantly, solo violin with orchestra, are a different matter and I'll go into detail about those later.

post #381 of 679

In general, violins are very SLIGHTLY recessed, when compared with other instruments. Either that or I'm just used to hearing them more aggressively, which I like.

 

Pre-burn in, they were really veiled, revealing no articulation or brilliance. That is no longer the case at all. They sound really natural and you can hear a lot of the detail, though it often sounds slightly more to the back of the texture. Here's an example, that's not classical:

<iframe width="560" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/7FwXdEyrGts" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

 

It actually sounds brighter and more spacious on youtube than on my itunes for some reason, but for example when you get to the violin solo which starts at about 21:23 to 22:20 (one of my favorite sections in any piece of music), to me it's not quite as forward as I would like, though admittedly on youtube for some reason it's pretty good. On my itunes even though it's lossless it's less clear. On the other hand, overall, I can hear a lot more of what's going on than I ever did before. (This whole album is a masterpiece, by the way).

 

Here is another example where to my ear the violin could be a tad more aggressive:

<iframe width="420" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/wvbwKC2EdKk" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

This is not a high quality file, but often times the bass (cello) overpowers the others a little, and I could use more aggressiveness in the violin for example during the climax at around 4:00. If my memory serves me, FXT90's presentation of this section was a bit more aggressive and brilliant (in a good way). Still nothing to really complain about here, though. It's just a different presentation.

 

In general, I find that chamber music recordings like string quartets are presented really well. Sometimes perhaps the cello takes over a little, but in general there is a lot of space and no congestion in the sound so if you choose to focus on the other instruments you can still make out what they're doing nicely.

 

In concertos, where you have a violin solo accompanied by a symphony orchestra, the way I would describe it is that the violin sounds a little farther away than what I was used to. This can be perceived as a good or bad thing. It does give a stronger impression of an actual stage or concert hall, and even though it might sound a little far away, there is great detail and texture to it... so it's like having a very high quality clear image, but seeing it at a distance rather than right in front of your face.

I think this recording illustrates that:

 

<iframe width="420" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/uWy8iibtd98" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

 

It really sounds great, though. You can really hear everything in the violin solo and you really get a sense of being in a concert hall. Again, there's enough space in the sound to divert your focus easily to any part of the orchestra or soloist that are playing. The sound may be a bit warmed up/sweetened when the violin goes into high registers but it's still pretty good.

 

 

On the other hand, I guess depending on the recording, sometimes the violin sounds really foward like here:

<iframe width="560" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/7jWmdzOxD9s" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

And in that case you just get even more detail but the sound is still really warm and natural and spacious. That's a good thing with Heifetz recordings because he always recorded with the mic very close to the violin, and it sounds very aggressive in some recordings.

 

Overall, I do get a really clear image of the nuances and details in the performance, but it takes active listening because what captures your ear most easily with these phones is the "big picture" sound, and not the minute details. But the details and texture are actually there and presented really well if you focus in. I like that approach; it's very natural.

 

OK, now it's time to go practice :redface: 

 

Edit: Hmm... can't seem to embed. Well, the links are there.


Edited by delmonte - 3/10/14 at 3:22am
post #382 of 679
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

In general, violins are very SLIGHTLY recessed, when compared with other instruments. Either that or I'm just used to hearing them more aggressively, which I like.

 

Pre-burn in, they were really veiled, revealing no articulation or brilliance. That is no longer the case at all. They sound really natural and you can hear a lot of the detail, though it often sounds slightly more to the back of the texture. Here's an example, that's not classical:

<iframe width="560" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/7FwXdEyrGts" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

 

It actually sounds brighter and more spacious on youtube than on my itunes for some reason, but for example when you get to the violin solo which starts at about 21:23 to 22:20 (one of my favorite sections in any piece of music), to me it's not quite as forward as I would like, though admittedly on youtube for some reason it's pretty good. On my itunes even though it's lossless it's less clear. On the other hand, overall, I can hear a lot more of what's going on than I ever did before. (This whole album is a masterpiece, by the way).

 

Here is another example where to my ear the violin could be a tad more aggressive:

<iframe width="420" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/wvbwKC2EdKk" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

This is not a high quality file, but often times the bass (cello) overpowers the others a little, and I could use more aggressiveness in the violin for example during the climax at around 4:00. If my memory serves me, FXT90's presentation of this section was a bit more aggressive and brilliant (in a good way). Still nothing to really complain about here, though. It's just a different presentation.

 

In general, I find that chamber music recordings like string quartets are presented really well. Sometimes perhaps the cello takes over a little, but in general there is a lot of space and no congestion in the sound so if you choose to focus on the other instruments you can still make out what they're doing nicely.

 

In concertos, where you have a violin solo accompanied by a symphony orchestra, the way I would describe it is that the violin sounds a little farther away than what I was used to. This can be perceived as a good or bad thing. It does give a stronger impression of an actual stage or concert hall, and even though it might sound a little far away, there is great detail and texture to it... so it's like having a very high quality clear image, but seeing it at a distance rather than right in front of your face.

I think this recording illustrates that:

 

<iframe width="420" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/uWy8iibtd98" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

 

It really sounds great, though. You can really hear everything in the violin solo and you really get a sense of being in a concert hall. Again, there's enough space in the sound to divert your focus easily to any part of the orchestra or soloist that are playing. The sound may be a bit warmed up/sweetened when the violin goes into high registers but it's still pretty good.

 

 

On the other hand, I guess depending on the recording, sometimes the violin sounds really foward like here:

<iframe width="560" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/7jWmdzOxD9s" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

And in that case you just get even more detail but the sound is still really warm and natural and spacious. That's a good thing with Heifetz recordings because he always recorded with the mic very close to the violin, and it sounds very aggressive in some recordings.

 

Overall, I do get a really clear image of the nuances and details in the performance, but it takes active listening because what captures your ear most easily with these phones is the "big picture" sound, and not the minute details. But the details and texture are actually there and presented really well if you focus in. I like that approach; it's very natural.

 

OK, now it's time to go practice :redface: 

 

Edit: Hmm... can't seem to embed. Well, the links are there.


 Thank you so much for your deatiled review. I think once you find the right tips you will like it even more.


Edited by ozkan - 3/10/14 at 12:38pm
post #383 of 679

Just got mine after 2 months of waiting. Customs claimed that the package was worth $200 dollars when it clearly stated in the box that it actually costed $97.. had to wait a full month for them to review the tax.. Anyway, the IM70 are fantastic. I was blown away by everything I listened with those but I had an instant eargasm with the guitar that goes along with the chorus from A Rush of Blood to the Head. Absolutely in love!

Are you guys using the memory foam tip? I tried it first but the sound was so muffled that I couldn't hear all the instruments.. I adjusted a bit and it seemed to get better but I guess the silicone tips still sound better to me. Maybe the foam doesn't fit very well on my ear or am I inserting them the wrong way?

post #384 of 679
Quote:
Originally Posted by nicholasbgr View Post
 

Just got mine after 2 months of waiting. Customs claimed that the package was worth $200 dollars when it clearly stated in the box that it actually costed $97.. had to wait a full month for them to review the tax.. Anyway, the IM70 are fantastic. I was blown away by everything I listened with those but I had an instant eargasm with the guitar that goes along with the chorus from A Rush of Blood to the Head. Absolutely in love!

Are you guys using the memory foam tip? I tried it first but the sound was so muffled that I couldn't hear all the instruments.. I adjusted a bit and it seemed to get better but I guess the silicone tips still sound better to me. Maybe the foam doesn't fit very well on my ear or am I inserting them the wrong way?


The sound will become clearer, regardless of the tips you use, after you burn them in. The foam tips reduce some of the clarity but so do the stock silicone tips. Everyone here recommends getting different silicone tips. Any wide bore, soft tip should be better. The stock tips are too firm and muddy the sound.

post #385 of 679
Quote:
Originally Posted by nicholasbgr View Post

Just got mine after 2 months of waiting. Customs claimed that the package was worth $200 dollars when it clearly stated in the box that it actually costed $97.. had to wait a full month for them to review the tax.. Anyway, the IM70 are fantastic. I was blown away by everything I listened with those but I had an instant eargasm with the guitar that goes along with the chorus from A Rush of Blood to the Head. Absolutely in love!
Are you guys using the memory foam tip? I tried it first but the sound was so muffled that I couldn't hear all the instruments.. I adjusted a bit and it seemed to get better but I guess the silicone tips still sound better to me. Maybe the foam doesn't fit very well on my ear or am I inserting them the wrong way?
If possible do try out the Sony hybrid tips. It's quite welcomed in here. smily_headphones1.gif
post #386 of 679
Quote:
Originally Posted by xaddictionx View Post


If possible do try out the Sony hybrid tips. It's quite welcomed in here. smily_headphones1.gif

I have a pair that someone gave me but I'm not sure they're genuine. Those that come with the MDR-EX10LP (http://www.amazon.com/Sony-MDREX10LP-BLK-In-Ear-Headphones/dp/B004XXQI1U/ref=dp_ob_title_ce) are the same you guys are using?

post #387 of 679
Quote:
Originally Posted by nicholasbgr View Post
 

I have a pair that someone gave me but I'm not sure they're genuine. Those that come with the MDR-EX10LP (http://www.amazon.com/Sony-MDREX10LP-BLK-In-Ear-Headphones/dp/B004XXQI1U/ref=dp_ob_title_ce) are the same you guys are using?

Yeah, they are guenine.

post #388 of 679

Any comparison between IM50/70 and Meelec M-Duo?

post #389 of 679
Quote:
Originally Posted by MelloWatic View Post

 

G08.jpg

It'll be nice if more reviewers can describe more specifically which part of Bass, Mids or Treble they are refering to.

 



My first post. I'm a newcomer by membership but I've been following headfi for years. In any case, I've been listening to my IM-70 for two weeks now. My experience with different phones ranges. My everyday IEM is a W30. I also own and was religious at one point over my ER4P which I couple with a headstage arrow 3g, Beyer DT990 Pro which I use on my desktop setup coupled with a fiio e7k and e17 combo, self modified SR80i, portapro and a couple other noise reduction headsets by AT and JVC (JVC being the better more musical of the two). My current source portable source is an X3 which I used for this review. I felt using the chart above I'd take a stab at reviewing the IM-70 in comparison to Westone 30s. Please note I do understand the differences of the IEMs drivers I am comparing. I'm not comparing the driver so much as the sounds I am hearing and I'm trying to focus on the IM-70 since there are plenty of reviews out there on the W30s.


Treble:
Extreme Highs: Absolutely none. Hiss is non-existent.
Treble: Recessed. It is there but mid treble overpowers slightly. There is a large gap in comparison to the W30 in this area. The sparkle is there but not quite as prominent as the W30. I found it slightly harder to make out the differences in snare and cymbal tones in many of my hard rock tracks the way I could with my w30s.This may open up more with some break in.
Mid treble is forward definitely more so than the W30. Female vocals sound fuller, sweeter and livelier. Male vocals are also enhanced a bit. I'd say this is the sweet spot that largely differentiates the 70s from the W30. Definitely the winner here.
Midrange:
In comparison to the W30 slightly more forward. I'd say closer to balanced across all 3 mid ranges. Guitar strums seem to resonate more although I did notice a bit of muddiness towards the lower end of the spectrum esp with acoustic guitar notes and low toned male vocals on certain tracks. Overall I'd say Midrange is pleasant and noticeable given my long time use of the W3. Very welcome IMO.
Bass:
Upper Bass: This varied. Upper bass was much more defined on R&B, HipHop and POP tracks whereas my Rock and Metal tracks I noticed less definition. So it got me thinking. I went through several swaps of music genre and noticed the 70's consistently performed better with R&B, Hip Hop and Pop Tracks. They just sounded better in this range overall.
Mid Bass:
IM70s pack a punch. Although the w30 ultimately wins in the punching contest IM70 is competitive and should satisfy any bass lover.
Bottom End
W30 wins in this department. IM70s go low but can't match the deep low rumble I get from certain tracks on the W30s. This isn't a game breaker here but I thought I'd note the difference.

Overall Impressions:
I'd definitely say the 70's seem to be geared more to POP, R&B and Hip Hop tracks which all sounded better IMO. Vocals (especially female) shined on the 70's. I noticed clarity and instrument separation was lacking in the upper ranges in comparison to the W30 when it came to rock and alternative tracks especially with cymbals and snare hits. Upper treble sparkles in some tracks were a bit muted and although I crave that sound, some absolutely despise it so this may not be a problem. Bass is great. I've read reviews of the 70 saying they outdo any other IEM in the bass department. I'd say the W3 beats the 70 in the bass department in both punch, energy and lows as well as clarity but the IM70 is no pushover and should satisfy anyone who has a hunger for head vibrating bass.

Comfort wise, I'd say W30 beats the 70s. This may only be related to my ear canal shape. I noticed the W3s sit in more snug into my ear than the ATs do. A little pushing and bending of the memory wire in the 70's do the trick but they don't fit in as if they were meant for my ear the way the W30s do.

The 70s are a keeper in my growing arsenal of IEMs. They will be my go to for R&B, HipHop, female vocals and of course the throwback slow jams.

I purchased my IM70s off of Amazon for a whopping 104.00US from a Japanese vendor who I forgot the name of. I think I got a good deal. Based on it's performance and cost I have absolutely zero regrets and would recommend them in a heartbeat especially for bassheads and R&B, POP and Hip Hop fans out there. If your a hard rock, alternative or metal freak which I also am, I'd stay away from these ones.

Tracks used for comparison:
All tracks were FLAC 16bit.
Source Fiio X3
POP/RB/HIPHOP:
Various Mariah Carey Tracks, Lorde Royals, Several Leona Lewis tracks, A few Kanye and of course Warren G.
Rock Alternative Metal:
A7X Hail to the king album, A Perfect Circle "The Noose", A few Sevendust tracks, A few Linkin Park Tracks, Queensryche "silent lucidity" A couple korn tracks from their dubstep album (forget the name)
Other:
A few Lindsey Sterling Tracks.
Edited by mobileninja - 3/16/14 at 2:00am
post #390 of 679

Here are my two cents worth for my findings with my IM70 >50hrs at least.

 

Bass: Slams hard and very physical, not overblown and does not obscure the mids.

Mids: Very nice, sounds correct to say the least

Treble: rough, it is not the strong point of this IEM to say the least. Lacks air.

Soundstage: Very closed sounding to me compared to say, a CK100

Detail: Not a particularly revealing IEM but clear sounding enough for me, greyish blackground that does not work well with piano recordings in a quiet room. Very forgiving IEM. 

 

Since the bass and mids integrate well, they work well with to reproduce the electric guitars low notes and growl in Bad Horsie by Steve Vai. You would be hard pressed to find an IEM with such tactile bass(not overblown but with dynamics) 

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