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Crosstalk after replacing minijack

post #1 of 5
Thread Starter 

I'm using this video to test

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hTvJoYnpeRQ

 

This is for the Etymotic ER4P.

There are 4 wires

Red - right

Black - left

white - It doesn't seem like this is connected to anything, testing the resistance between this and the left, right, and shielding shows it's open.

Shielding - common ground

 

The L/R/Ground wires seem properly isolated. I used very little solder to ensure there isn't extra that might create a short. I placed heatshrink over the left and right wire.

 

I'm getting a fair amount of crosstalk now, maybe at 1/5th the volume.

 

Any ideas?


Edited by astro - 11/29/13 at 9:20pm
post #2 of 5
Thread Starter 

I'm thinking perhaps the crosstalk was always there but I just never tested it. From googling, several sources suggest that crosstalk is common when using a common ground, and apparently there's no way around it with a 3.5mm minijack.

http://www.6moons.com/audioreviews/balancedheadphones/one.html

 

Can some of you test for crosstalk with your headphones and tell me if it's normal?

post #3 of 5
Quote:
Originally Posted by astro View Post
 

I'm thinking perhaps the crosstalk was always there but I just never tested it. From googling, several sources suggest that crosstalk is common when using a common ground, and apparently there's no way around it with a 3.5mm minijack.

http://www.6moons.com/audioreviews/balancedheadphones/one.html

 

This is ********. While "unavoidable" impedance in a shared ground does cause crosstalk in certain situations in practical applications with headphones its just an idiot parroting what he does not understand. 

 

If the common ground has a VERY low impedance relative to the headphone impedance it will have no discernable effect on sound. Measure the impedance across a properly soldered 1/4" plug and get back to me on that....

 

If the common ground does not have a low impedance relative to the load impedance it will start to create stereo crosstalk. When does this happen? Read on - 

 

With practical headphone-ish loads (16ohms and up) the only time you see crosstalk from ground is if you do not solder the ground connection properly. 

 

With loads in the 1-2ohm range (lolerskates im an idiot for mentioning 1-2ohms on a headphone board) the effects of the internal resistance in the plug & connector can cause crosstalk. Its too bad for the parrot that nobody uses 1-2ohm headphones, so mentioning it is an indication of no understanding. 

 

Can you measure the following:

DC(ohms)

Tip to Ring

Sleeve to Ring

Tip to Sleeve

 

and report back.

post #4 of 5
Thread Starter 

Thanks for setting me straight. I'm a noob at this and I'm just trying to figure out what went wrong.

 

Here are the measurements. I'm not sure how precise they are, I just recorded the lowest numbers I could get by pressing as hard as I could with the probe tips.

 

Tip to ring - 58ohms

Sleeve to ring - 34.3ohms

Tip to sleeve - 34.9ohms


Edited by astro - 11/30/13 at 1:56pm
post #5 of 5

errr 58 ohms? it should be exactly twice what the sleeve to ring or sleeve to tip measures. 

 

i would check your solder joints. 

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