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Is it worth buying seperate audio components for a hi-fi system?

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 

hello all, I want a good hi-fi system for my future flat and am wondering..is it worth buying a set from sony for example for £175. (my max budget is £300) or buying the 2+ speakers separate and then the amplifier? i'm sure it's called an amplifier..or is it called a receiver? im a noob at hi-fi! anyway, I would need some gear suggestions as for my system I want good bass

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post #2 of 10

Only one way to do this. Actually listen to what you will buy and not worry about how to do it. Your budget limits you so just finding something that sounds best to you is more important than brand or specs. If you can hear it, don't buy it.

post #3 of 10

Tight budget's and separates often don't mix. The more you limit your shopping list, the less likely you are to find good deals.

post #4 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Speedskater View Post

Tight budget's and separates often don't mix. The more you limit your shopping list, the less likely you are to find good deals.


 



I agree, with seperates there is a minimum where you get your mony's worth and I woud guess that close to your max budget if not slightly higher. For that kind of money there are some pretty nice sounding boom-box/stereo systems out there that would rival what you can put together for 300 pounds.
post #5 of 10

Going with used separates is going to beat 99% of boombox/shelf systems.  Boomboxes are generally set up for the tastes of the young and budget conscious and not really for high fidelity.  On the other hand, monitors (small powered speakers - speakers with amps built into each one) are designed to be pretty neutral and true to the recording.  A pair of used studio monitors (powered speakers) like M-Audio BX2 connected with a mini to dual XLR cable to an iPod are going to sound really darn good for the money, although a shelf/mini system is going to have a lot of extra features like radio, CD changer, tape deck, equalizers, and so on.  

post #6 of 10

Separates always sound better but you need a bigger budget.  Used is a way to save but still your budget is not in the range to set yourself up completely.  My suggestion then is to buy a nice headphone amp that has enough power to run efficient bookshelf or desktop speakers.  Use the amp with headphones.  Your next purchase would be speakers.  This way you get the best of both worlds, headphone and speaker listening.  This set up works well with your PC, i-phone, or Cd Player.  I use this in my office at work and use my i-pad as the source, a hybrid integrated headphone amp with 16 watts of power and a pair of efficient Polk bookshelf speakers.  Sounds great with headphones or the speakers.

post #7 of 10

I won't say it sounds better or worse.

Lets say you have a headphone amp/speakers amp/dac combo set and suddenly a cap/transistor came loose or breaks... you will lose the whole system, or you feel like the amp is not what you've been looking for. 

post #8 of 10

Things break, that's life.  No matter how simple you keep it something can always break.  The fun of this hobby is upgrading.  There is always a better headphone or amp or DAC.  To not start somewhere no matter how small, seems to be a mistake.  You gotta jump in sometime.

post #9 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Axo0oxA View Post
 

Separates always sound better but you need a bigger budget.  Used is a way to save but still your budget is not in the range to set yourself up completely.  My suggestion then is to buy a nice headphone amp that has enough power to run efficient bookshelf or desktop speakers.  Use the amp with headphones.  Your next purchase would be speakers.  This way you get the best of both worlds, headphone and speaker listening.  This set up works well with your PC, i-phone, or Cd Player.  I use this in my office at work and use my i-pad as the source, a hybrid integrated headphone amp with 16 watts of power and a pair of efficient Polk bookshelf speakers.  Sounds great with headphones or the speakers.

It's all relative, there are plenty of crappy separates. The used comment was a good one but even in HiEnd, a $5k integrated can beat $5k separates. He's also not talking about a PC/headphone system. If it were me and I was buying new, I'd look at Sonos and Audio Engine products. Best of both worlds at cheap prices. A2s are a bit bass limited but VG speakers at their price.

post #10 of 10

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/New-HIFI-SMSL-SA-50-50W-2-TDA7492-ClassT-Amp-Integrated-Tripath-Stereo-Amplifier-/301031078498?pt=UK_AudioTVElectronics_HomeAudioHiFi_Amplifiers&hash=item4616d9ba62

 

how about a T-amp...inexpensive...this is a 50w x 2 .

 

 

there are some 20-30w options too.

 

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lots of 2nd good british bookshelf speakers in the resale mkt..since u are in UK?  :P

 

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