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Naturalization and Parody in manga today [Serious]

post #1 of 4
Thread Starter 

I wish to start a new groups discussion based on serious talk in Asian Anime and Manga today.

 

The purpose of this is to have real discussion, and posts about what I think are some extremely interesting things going on in manga. 

 

To begin with, I wish to give to you some defintions of the words I'm using today. This is because the definition is often forgotten, and the purpose of the word that I am using it in may also be different.


Defintions:

Naturalization(humanities definition)-Naturalization is the process by which social ideologies shape our views of nature and are then 
interpreted as coming from nature in order to justify those very same ideologies

 

Parody- imitative work to mock, criticize or comment. 


 

Why do I want to use these two terms of naturalization and parody today? I'm using these for the lack of a better word. I can't really think of any other better term to call manga such as Minamoto kun Monogatari or Blush DC.

 

So what do I mean. Let's start off with the idea of naturalization in anime and manga(from now on called 'media'). This is something that people see in media all the time. Media today attempts to take real ideas and apply them by using different principles. This is because media can never be 'real'. They are just anime and manga in a sense. That is all that they are. They are restricted by budget, time restraints, and in that they are just 'drawings'. And so what is done often is that media uses a different type of system as a way to confront 'real' ideas. Harem and romance anime's use an extremely steel headed MC often.

 

This is a form of naturalization then in where the viewer is able to see and connect because he/she can easilly see that the MC is steel headed. Well, the anime has to often make things blatant and easy to tell as a way to make up for it on being only media. Another example would be in the crazy tactics used in Oda Nobuna or Girls und Panzer or even full on action anime like Guilty Crown. So often in those anime, we get action sequences that are just 'impossible'. Obviously they are you will think. It's 'media' (remembering that I'm using the term media to mean anime and manga). Well so why is it that media uses those impossible scenes.

 

There are many explanations, but one of them is that it will otherwise be impossible also to show real life impossible events. Many times throughout history, battles, and events happened despite all odds. Media thus uses those over the top scenes as a way to often make up for its short commings by only being media. In GuP: How did all those tanks not see that one tank hiding? What about firing that turret? How did that tank easilly flank? The question is often asked, and in the end. IT all comes down to the idea that media uses scenes often to make up for its inability to be real

 

Naturalization in the definition of humanities is a much deeper idea. But today, I will only go with the definition that I wrote in the above paragraphs. Where media uses its own form of execution as a way to make up for its inability to be real.

 

And so comes what I really wanted to talk about today. The genius behind media like Minamoto Kun Monogatari and Blush DC. (minimal spoilers ahead about them. I'll only be referencing base info about the series. Stuff you will get from the first few chapters or by reading the MAL bio)

 

MKM and Blush DC both use naturalization and parody to an extreme. Both start off with a base. This base 'storyboard' is very generic. We have our typical girls, harems, hot female MC etc etc. But then, it unleashes parody onto it. It then changes the story, the exeuction of the story, and many details of the base that we often see in 'media'. It imitates them by using the same base as the regular media, as a way to comment and change. The authors intention may not have been to truly comment or criticize, but the fact that both mangaka's of Blush DC and MKM even started off with generic bases as they did leads me to believe that deep down, it was something that they wanted to make known.

 

To expand on this idea, I will be using Blush DC exclusively now. Blush DC gives you the generic cast, art, story, and allure. Steel headed MC with generic qualities and personality traits. A childhood friend that likes him, and a female MC that is very hot. School setting, general best friends, and school support characters. It adds one level to this base by then extending the fact that the female MC works as an 'image' girl. Whatever this means. So the base story is set right? Generic almost everything with the exception of the 'allure' part which is still quite extraoridnarily common. But at that point, naturalization of ideas and the parody comes into play.

 

(spoilers ahead for Blush DC)

We first learn that the female MC is quite slutty. Male MC sleeps with her and has quite a few encounters with his childhood friend in the bath etc. But what happens then is quite an anomoly. The mangaka flips the world upside down on us. The manga is now a documentary about prostituion, slavery, sex, and the loss of innocence. With naturalization we need to explore what is with the current market. What is currently 'everywhere' in media right now are rape, loli hentai and the acceptance of a lot of sex in 'media'. Rape, affairs, and loli stuff is shown often with people 'supporting' that situation in a sense. It's amusing, its good, its enticing. This is everywhere in regular manga and hentai. Blush DC thus takes it to a new level. It shuns this idea of people thinking its ok by giving you the base smart, hot girl, and giving you a story of her being rapped, psychologically unstable, and in the depths of hell. The naturalziation is thus where the mangaka turns the world upside down on the reader, throws the hot female MC in rape hell as a way to show a state. The state of anime and manga and the world. 

 

The parody is easy to see at this point. Parody thus goes hand in hand with naturalization in 'media' like Blush DC and MKM as a way to take a base manga and change its events, what happens, character bios as a function of commentary on the state of the world, but more often than not, on the state of the anime and manga industry. Most mangaka's that do this don't seem to do it as a way to make commentary on the world, but rather to show the industry that they can indeed be 'different'.

 

Let me know if you guys have any quesitons, comments, disagreements.


Edited by bowei006 - 11/28/13 at 9:11pm
post #2 of 4

(reading):popcorn:

post #3 of 4
Interesting.
I haven't read either of those manga but they really sound like a pretty drastic comment on the state of "media" these days.
I mean, there are a lot of anime/manga that comment on the state of our society.
Sure, it's not nearly as drastic as these manga, but Joshiraku kind of does the same thing.
More lighthearted and in a funny way, but they do criticize the manga/anime industry by e.g. stating in a lot of episodes that the girls are only talking nonsensical stuff so that the viewer can concentrate on how kawaii they are. There are even a few scenes where the characters themselves talk about how someone could be this stupid to think that it was a good idea to make an anime out of the Joshiraku manga. The manga mostly is dialog and people nowadays want to see nonstop action etc.
They also parody a lot of the stereotypical characters you get to see in every second anime these days. The chick withe the glasses does not have real eyes behind said glasses...she says that the whole point of her character is to have someone in this anime to please the glasses fetishes viewer persons. So if someone would take away her glasses it wouldn't really matter if she had eyes in the first place because her whole character would be pointless without these glasses.

There is also the stereotypical dumb, small, helium-voice kawaii girl. Everyone is expecting her to be cute all the time but in some scenes she has a short monolog in which she mumbles to herself in a deep and totally not kawaii voice that she is tired of playing the dumb cute girl for everyone. She is also cursing a lot :-P

Just two examples of how this anime is parodying the whole moe/slice of life trend in anime. They are also doing that pretty subtle from time to time, so that it almost gets drowned in all the moe nonsense that is going on all the time. Pretty clever IMO.

Go and watch Joshiraku.
It is the funniest anime I ever watched.
And don't let yourself get fooled by all the nonsense that is going on there! There is a metrical poop - ton of critique and parody hiding behind the intentionally set up wall of moe!
A pretty clever anime that shows its true potential only to viewers who don't start to watch it just for the lulz and cute girls ;-)


PS: I wrote this on my phone (^o^)
post #4 of 4
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Yum Goong View Post

Interesting.
I haven't read either of those manga but they really sound like a pretty drastic comment on the state of "media" these days.
I mean, there are a lot of anime/manga that comment on the state of our society.
Sure, it's not nearly as drastic as these manga, but Joshiraku kind of does the same thing.
More lighthearted and in a funny way, but they do criticize the manga/anime industry by e.g. stating in a lot of episodes that the girls are only talking nonsensical stuff so that the viewer can concentrate on how kawaii they are. There are even a few scenes where the characters themselves talk about how someone could be this stupid to think that it was a good idea to make an anime out of the Joshiraku manga. The manga mostly is dialog and people nowadays want to see nonstop action etc.
They also parody a lot of the stereotypical characters you get to see in every second anime these days. The chick withe the glasses does not have real eyes behind said glasses...she says that the whole point of her character is to have someone in this anime to please the glasses fetishes viewer persons. So if someone would take away her glasses it wouldn't really matter if she had eyes in the first place because her whole character would be pointless without these glasses.

There is also the stereotypical dumb, small, helium-voice kawaii girl. Everyone is expecting her to be cute all the time but in some scenes she has a short monolog in which she mumbles to herself in a deep and totally not kawaii voice that she is tired of playing the dumb cute girl for everyone. She is also cursing a lot :-P

Just two examples of how this anime is parodying the whole moe/slice of life trend in anime. They are also doing that pretty subtle from time to time, so that it almost gets drowned in all the moe nonsense that is going on all the time. Pretty clever IMO.

Go and watch Joshiraku.
It is the funniest anime I ever watched.
And don't let yourself get fooled by all the nonsense that is going on there! There is a metrical poop - ton of critique and parody hiding behind the intentionally set up wall of moe!
A pretty clever anime that shows its true potential only to viewers who don't start to watch it just for the lulz and cute girls ;-)


PS: I wrote this on my phone (^o^)

I need to congradulate you for writing that on your phone. I can not topz

 

Seems very interesting as well.

 

Glad people are getting what I mean by parody. Most think of parody as a comedic thing, but I'm bringing mine up differently/

 

I'm still not really in the mood for such an anime. I've been focsing on manga recently really

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