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B&W P7 vs NAD VISO HP50 - Page 2

post #16 of 92

hahah true that. i got the he400 after really loving the m100 & k550. it's really the perfect set for home listening & i haven't been feelin the itch from the bite of the headphonebug to go demo every new pair of headphones on the market anymore. hahah. if you're just looking for home-listening & don't have too many kiddies then, ithink sticking w/ open headphones will give you the best sound quality for the price.

post #17 of 92

I thought about getting a HE-400 but I tend to gravitate towards closed backs because I can use them on my commute and at work.  Would really love to listen the HP50 if I get a chance.

post #18 of 92

OK, some first impressions. I just received a pair of the NAD VISO HP50s. I've had the B&W P7s for almost a month.

 

To me, they sound more alike than they sound different. The upper end on the P7s has a more aggressive "pointed" sound, whereas the NADs reveal an upper end that seems to be more embedded into the mix. However this range doesn't seem to be missing anything (I'm not sensing a huge roll-off). What really surprised me is that the bass seems more "bloated" than the P7s! I'll burn these for awhile and see if that changes, although I've read that these are good to go out-of-the-box. More listening to come, but right now I'm liking the treble better than the P7s; it's less aggressive but most certainly there. As to the mids, wow, they seem really close to me (as in, not über different from the "recessed" mids of the P7s).

 

As far as fit is concerned, it's kind of a toss up. I have no prob with the cushy headband on the NADs, but the ear cups share that munchkin size that so many cans seem to have adopted. They're reasonably soft but they don't go totally around my ears. Plus, my ears are touching the driver pad. I think I actually like the fit on the P7s more. They envelope my ears in a more circumaural manner, although my blasted "attached" earlobes are always problematic.

 

So, to recap on the NADs:

• The bass seems bloated.

• The treble seems to be more integrated with the mix (that's good!).

• The fit isn't perfect, the cups are small and shallow.

 

I'll post again after more burning and listening.


Edited by dlhen68 - 12/24/13 at 7:14pm
post #19 of 92

@dlhen68, great first impressions. i would just like to note that often when you first switch between headphones, you prefer the sound signature you are more used to. since you're lucky & own both, I would recommend extensive listening for 2 weeks or more! :) also, I have found that extended exclusive listening with your new headphones for a while, then switching back to your old headphones yield surprising results as well. good luck & have fun! heh

post #20 of 92
Quote:
Originally Posted by money4me247 View Post
 

to be fair a short demo at best buy doesn't really do a pair of headphones justice.

 

why don't you try the Philips closed versions if you are looking for that sound signature? You could always go Mad Dogs too if you are trying to stay at the $300 mark.

True, but even a short demo can expose an obvious fault or two of any headphones. For instance you can hear in a minute if the treble is either shrill or missing in action and if the bass is bloated and flooding into the middle frequencies. It is like not getting to know a man's character at the first brief encounter but seeing that he's got a black eye.


Edited by zorin - 12/27/13 at 3:42pm
post #21 of 92
Quote:
Originally Posted by zorin View Post
 

True, but even a short demo can expose an obvious fault or two of any headphones. For instance you can hear in a minute if the treble is either shrill or missing in action and if the bass is bloated and flooding into the middle frequencies. It is like not getting to know a man's character at the first brief encounter but seeing that he's got a black eye.

 

Pads change with time, so can drivers.  The combination of those can change the way the acoustic system works as a whole with a person.  Initial impressions are a good thing, but it's what happens in the long run that matters.  

post #22 of 92
Quote:
Originally Posted by MetalElvis View Post
 

Looking for the best closed over the ear headphones and I´ve narrowed it down to these contenders.

 

What are your opinions? Which one should have the title?

 

I know Tyll loves the NAD VISO HP50, so I´m the most interested in that one and the RoomFeel feature interests me ´cause I´m also a speaker / studio monitor guy, but you never know with headphones. I´ve been trying out some other headphones Tyll liked, like the UE9000/6000, but they were just awful (bloated bass and very dark/muffled treble). But then again with many other headphones I agree with Tyll´s reviews.

 

So please give me some valuable insight, since I can´t audition these anywhere. Would appreciate it! I like a neutral sound, like Stax SR-009. But I also like some bass, not over bloated, can be slightly more than the Stax, but fine also with the amount of Stax bass. I like more low bass (under 150Hz), not the muddy upper bass (150-300Hz). But I want clear and smooth mids and treble, not dark.

 

Couple things I should mention also. The Sennheiser Momentum bass amount is already too much bass for me. HD 650 bass amount is fine, but they are very muffled in treble. Also LCD-2 is too muffled. One contender is also the new LCD-XC, but it´s a bit out of my price range at the moment and I´m afraid it doesn´t have enough treble that is the "warm Audeze signature sound", but I don´t know if they have increased it for their new headphones. But I have the LCD-2 and I´ve tried the LCD-3 and they are just too dark for me.

Very good perceptive views regarding the two Sennheisers and Audez'es. [...very overrated in my view]. You have good balanced sense of hearing. 

You did not say what is your budget or spending limit so I'll give you two suggestions, one a top pick in the budget category and the other one just a top portable when only the sound quality is considered.

The choices for good closed headphones are very limited. Seeing your demands on the sound presentation the Audio Technica A900X LTD might be 'right up your alley'. Not much about them on head-fi, only this - http://www.head-fi.org/t/696188/audio-technica-ath-a900xltd-vs-ath-w1000x 

A900X LTD are an improved version of A900X. A900X review - http://www.head-fi.org/products/audio-technica-ath-a900x-art-monitor-headphones-japan-import .

Read the reviews to get an idea about A900X LTD. 

On Amazon there is one available for 360 USD. [Japanese sellers only to be safe]. A store in Osaka is selling  two used ones in very good/excellent condition for 246 USD. - http://www.e-earphone.jp/shop/shopbrand.html?search=a900x%20ltd&prize1=a900x%20ltd&sort=brandname . If you decide to buy them you'll have to do it through an agent. - https://www.kuboten.com/ - to send an email click on FAQ and go to the bottom of the page. Address it to Craig and send him the website address of the store page. You will have to pay the agent's fee. Do not buy from Ebay, there are fake ATH A900X and A900X LTD being sold.

If you decide to go 'the best sound regardless of price way' than the top portable choice are the Beyerdynamic T5p. These headphones have a slightly soft treble but this would come handy when dealing with a lot of badly mastered tracks and albums. You can get used T5p on head-fi for around 800-900 USD. They are well worth saving for, in my view.

Good luck to you finding headphones that would serve your ears well.


Edited by zorin - 12/27/13 at 5:13pm
post #23 of 92
Quote:
Originally Posted by zorin View Post
 

True, but even a short demo can expose an obvious fault or two of any headphones. For instance you can hear in a minute if the treble is either shrill or missing in action and if the bass is bloated and flooding into the middle frequencies. It is like not getting to know a man's character at the first brief encounter but seeing that he's got a black eye.


hahah. I personally think that a short demo will only show you the obvious difference compared to whatever sound signature you are currently used to. Sometimes it sounds like there is more shrillness/bloasted bass but when you try a different set of headphones, the issue is still there as the problem is with the recording. A lot of times you hear people complaining of too little bass after a brief demo, and it turns out they are used to some bass-boosted pair of headphones like the beats. That's why I think extensive listening (1-2 weeks) with some direct comparison tests is the best way to judge a pair of headphones. Though I understand that  we don't a have time to do extensive testing with every pair of headphones.

 

I think a better analogy is more like meeting a new chick while dating someone else. She might seem a bit cold when you first talk to her, but after you get used to her she warms up ;) heh lol.

post #24 of 92

Well, I've done a LOT of listening to both the HP50s and the P7s.

Both sets are obviously colored, so it comes down to personal taste.

 

Here are my distilled observations:

 

- The P7s seem to me to be more analytical. The treble is more forward than the HP50s and the bass is more subtle and focused.

- The HP50s have rolled off treble (retaining some sparkle) and more aggressive bass.

 

I find the mids on both sets to be very close (in terms of being slightly recessed).

 

With a little EQ I can make these sound pretty close to each other.

 

So it's coming down to physical fit. Right now I'm leaning toward the P7s. The cups are larger and deeper. On the HP50s, my ears not only touch the driver pad, but my lobes are also compressed. I can reduce the outer ear pressure with a bit of DIY padding pushed up under the ear pads, but the lobes are still taking some pressure. For my particular ears, the P7 is more forgiving in the fit department. And I can do a little EQ for those fairly rare cases where things are a bit too strident in the treble.

 

Both of these sets are very good. I think whichever one you choose, you will adapt well to the sound signature over time and will find a great deal of enjoyment in your listening. As far as the fit goes, you really need to try them for yourself.

post #25 of 92
I really think it should be emphasized that unless you plan on using an equalizer (don't know about movie watching), the NAD's don't have much bass presence (I like to feel some oomph).

And despite not being as lively and exciting as the P7, they also don't accentuate musical flourishes like the P7's; possibly the treble or better instrument separation.

It's a matter of taste, of course, but the P7 might be the better crowd-pleaser among the two.
post #26 of 92

The bass on the NADs seems pretty strong to these ears, sometimes a bit too strong. :/

post #27 of 92
Quote:
Originally Posted by dlhen68 View Post
 

The bass on the NADs seems pretty strong to these ears, sometimes a bit too strong. :/

They're great across genres, but when it comes to rap/electronic music (don't know if you listen to these!) they're a bit lacking, I think. The P7's were perfect for me because the bass sounded similar to what I set my equalizer to on the NAD's.

post #28 of 92
Quote:
Originally Posted by dlhen68 View Post
 

Well, I've done a LOT of listening to both the HP50s and the P7s.

Both sets are obviously colored, so it comes down to personal taste.

 

Here are my distilled observations:

 

- The P7s seem to me to be more analytical. The treble is more forward than the HP50s and the bass is more subtle and focused.

- The HP50s have rolled off treble (retaining some sparkle) and more aggressive bass.

 

I find the mids on both sets to be very close (in terms of being slightly recessed).

 

With a little EQ I can make these sound pretty close to each other.

 

So it's coming down to physical fit. Right now I'm leaning toward the P7s. The cups are larger and deeper. On the HP50s, my ears not only touch the driver pad, but my lobes are also compressed. I can reduce the outer ear pressure with a bit of DIY padding pushed up under the ear pads, but the lobes are still taking some pressure. For my particular ears, the P7 is more forgiving in the fit department. And I can do a little EQ for those fairly rare cases where things are a bit too strident in the treble.

 

Both of these sets are very good. I think whichever one you choose, you will adapt well to the sound signature over time and will find a great deal of enjoyment in your listening. As far as the fit goes, you really need to try them for yourself.


+1 great observations. i feel the same way with most closed, portable headphones from the $200-$400 price range. generally more similar than different. fit & comfort is very important considerations. also, don't forget about factoring in the price too when choosing! :)


Edited by money4me247 - 12/30/13 at 3:39pm
post #29 of 92

I find it curious that neither of these very good headphones is showing up on various "best of 2013" lists...

post #30 of 92
Quote:
Originally Posted by dlhen68 View Post
 

I find it curious that neither of these very good headphones is showing up on various "best of 2013" lists...


The Viso HP50's are featured here: http://news.cnet.com/8301-13645_3-57615864-47/audiophiliacs-picks-for-2013-golden-age-of-headphone-design/#!

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