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Safe Listening Levels: Denon AH-D600 + Schiit Modi

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

Hello everyone,

 

So I just picked up a pair of Denon AH-D600 and the Schiit Magni and was just wondering what the safe levels of listening should be. Since these cans have a very low impedance (25 ohms), would turning up the amp (half way) damage the headphones? 

 

Denon AHD600 Maximum power input: 1800 Mw

Schiit Magni Maximum Power output : 1.2 W RMS per channel 

 

Would that mean that I am "theoretically" fine cranking it to max on my amp?

 

P.S. Nooby question #2, can I run my active speakers through this amp instead of having to reconnect the speakers to my pc everytime i want to switch. 

 

Thanks in advance,

post #2 of 12
Thread Starter 

can anyone help me out, please. 

post #3 of 12
If the maximum input is 1.8W, and the maximum output of the amplifier is 1.2W, I don't think you will have any problems. (other than possibly damaging your hearing)
You should definitely not connect the headphone output to your speakers though. You never want to send an amplified signal into an amplifier. Look into an RCA splitter/switchbox.
post #4 of 12
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by StudioSound View Post

If the maximum input is 1.8W, and the maximum output of the amplifier is 1.2W, I don't think you will have any problems. (other than possibly damaging your hearing)
You should definitely not connect the headphone output to your speakers though. You never want to send an amplified signal into an amplifier. Look into an RCA splitter/switchbox.

okay thank you very much. Unfortunately, I already plugged in my speakers quite a few times, they were never turned up, just for watching tv shows. Will the damage be done immediately or through sustained use (I will obviously stop now).

post #5 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by krown View Post
 

okay thank you very much. Unfortunately, I already plugged in my speakers quite a few times, they were never turned up, just for watching tv shows. Will the damage be done immediately or through sustained use (I will obviously stop now).

It probably won't damage the speakers, at least not at low levels, but I don't recommend it at all.

post #6 of 12
Thread Starter 

alright, thanks a lot. I will look into a switch box like you recommended. 

post #7 of 12

Have the same cans, usually listening below 79 dB avg. I'd recommend getting CanOpener ( http://www.canopenerapp.com ) if you have an iphone. You can custom enter in sensitivity and impedance so that you can get a fairly good estimate of what db output is being sent to your d600. 

 

Also, listen to your ears. Once and while, especially with these sets, you are going to want to crank it. On bass-heavy music without a lot of high-end, this won't feel so bad. Just remember any frequency heard consistently over extended periods of time is going to cause damage to those cilia in the ear. :)

 

To me listening should be dynamic, with quieter music interspersed by more impactful moments. If its all loud all the time, you numb to it, and the music loses the impact.

post #8 of 12
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Malfunkt View Post
 

Have the same cans, usually listening below 79 dB avg. I'd recommend getting CanOpener ( http://www.canopenerapp.com ) if you have an iphone. You can custom enter in sensitivity and impedance so that you can get a fairly good estimate of what db output is being sent to your d600. 

 

Also, listen to your ears. Once and while, especially with these sets, you are going to want to crank it. On bass-heavy music without a lot of high-end, this won't feel so bad. Just remember any frequency heard consistently over extended periods of time is going to cause damage to those cilia in the ear. :)

 

To me listening should be dynamic, with quieter music interspersed by more impactful moments. If its all loud all the time, you numb to it, and the music loses the impact.

Unfortunately, I don't have an Iphone (android guy). You described my listening style exactly, haha, I couldn't agree more. These headphones seem quite quiet and so I do turn it up a bit, I was just scared I could potentially be damaging them. 

 

Since I use these cans for home use only, how would I figure out the dB output from my PC/AMP. I have a soundcard if that makes it easier.

post #9 of 12

Hey Krown, I'm not sure how you could measure these. I believe it actually requires some measuring equipment like Tyll uses at InnerFidelity. I believe CanOpener can pull this off as the dosimeter settings are calibrated and standardized for the iPhone. With Android this would be pretty difficult given all the various phones. 

 

It did seem that my D600 sound changed quite a bit, from being a bit too bass-coloured and diffuse, to really opening up. I can hear the details fine, but initially it felt that it was quite tilted towards dark and bass-heavy. 

 

It could have been burn in, but I think it was that I was used to both my MDR-EX600 (very detailed bass) and Shure 840 which both have nowhere near the bass presence of the AH-D600. Now I can't go back! 

 

Unless you have pre-existing hearing damage, I can tell you that you can turn these cans up at a louder volume that isn't immediately fatiguing, yet is very punchy and energetic and you'd still be around 85 dB. Not ideal for extended listening but good for short periods of intensive listening.

 

Not a fatiguing headphone at all. 

post #10 of 12
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Malfunkt View Post
 

Hey Krown, I'm not sure how you could measure these. I believe it actually requires some measuring equipment like Tyll uses at InnerFidelity. I believe CanOpener can pull this off as the dosimeter settings are calibrated and standardized for the iPhone. With Android this would be pretty difficult given all the various phones. 

 

It did seem that my D600 sound changed quite a bit, from being a bit too bass-coloured and diffuse, to really opening up. I can hear the details fine, but initially it felt that it was quite tilted towards dark and bass-heavy. 

 

It could have been burn in, but I think it was that I was used to both my MDR-EX600 (very detailed bass) and Shure 840 which both have nowhere near the bass presence of the AH-D600. Now I can't go back! 

 

Unless you have pre-existing hearing damage, I can tell you that you can turn these cans up at a louder volume that isn't immediately fatiguing, yet is very punchy and energetic and you'd still be around 85 dB. Not ideal for extended listening but good for short periods of intensive listening.

 

Not a fatiguing headphone at all. 

Alright, thanks for all the help. One last question, if you don't mind, have you had a listen to the ultrasone line? Thinking of picking up a Pro 900 as well and was wondering how different the sound would be between the two.

 

PS: is it me or does the frame/ headband seem really flimsy? I feel like its gonna snap any minute. 


Edited by krown - 11/26/13 at 6:49pm
post #11 of 12

No, haven't heard the Ultrasone Pro 900. Re: the headband, its seemed quite thin, but looking at the design, I think its actually quite well designed. Minimal bulk, and it doesn't seem like there are any major stress points (ie. HD555, HD595). Light enough to withstand a drop, wouldn't want to sit on them. What gets me is this that I have a big head, and the AH-D600 fits me without any extension on the headband. Fully extended who is this headphone made for? I could see that if ones head is deflated, this headphone could pose issues. :bigsmile_face:

 

Comparing them right now to a pair of MDR-EX600 in-ears at the moment (listening to Electric Light Orchestra 'Eldorado' DCC Gold and some Proem 'Enough Conflict'). Quite a different presentation. The AH-D600 a much fuller sound and speaker-like. The EX600 I may prefer for its neutrality, but drums, strings and timpani (or rototoms in ELO's case) just rain down upon you with the D600. On Proem, listening to the D600 the bassline move along subterranean passages, synth pads envelope, and on the EX600 the frequencies shimmer, and the micro-edit cuts of each drum hit lightly rapping your ears, the bass well defined, subdued but coherent. 

Just got the EX600s back, after letting a friend try them out for a month. It definitely brings some perspective back. Thinking of selling them locally, but they are so good, so I may just sell them at price that only a head-fier wouldn't balk at! 

post #12 of 12
Thread Starter 

Yep, the headphones are really lightweight and the aesthetics are nice as well. I must have a huge head then because I pull it down a notch :P.

 

I think I'm gonna pull the trigger and grab a Pro 900, I need that "mid bass punch". These are great headphones (sub-bass is phenomenal), but in quite a few tracks, they feel a little empty without that hard kick, hopefully the 900 will deliver.

 

Thanks for the help!

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