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Recommend a headphone purely for music

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 

Hey guys, I currently own a Sony MDR ZX100 headphones. I was satisfied with it's performance but now it really started to suck because it couldn't play my .flac files to their full potential. I live in India where my options are limited and I've read a lot of reviews about headphones in this forum especially of then Senheiser HD 439 and Shure SRH 440.

From what I've come to know, the 440's are very neutral and don't have bass. Coming from the ZX100 I want to know if the 440's have lesser bass than the ZX100 or more.

I use a Samsung S2 with PowerAMP. So will the 440's perform better than the HD439's with EQ tuning?

 

I mostly listen to heavy metal, classical, jazz and rock. I would like a little bass but not too much. My current headphones have no bass at all. I would also like to know if it's more comfortable than the ZX100 because these cans squeezed my ears too much and I've tolerated them enough now. I use them 60-90 minutes at a stretch.

 

I know I'll be happy with either 439 or the 440. I'm getting the 439 for 70$ and the 440 for 90$. I don't mind spending a little more for the 440 if it is better than the 439. 

post #2 of 7
I would use this thread: http://www.head-fi.org/t/433318/shootout-108-portable-headphones-reviewed-denon-dn-hp1000-added-09-07-13
post #3 of 7
Thread Starter 

Thanks! Reading the thread now :)

post #4 of 7

Hi!

 

You should also consider Takstar Pro 80 or Gemini HSR-1000 (Same headphones). I don't know if you can buy them in your country.

 

Some people complain about confort on Shure's Srh-440.

 

Off-topic recommendation:

 

If you want to get the full potential of your listening experience, the best you can do is getting good recordings.

You can also read about " The Loudness War " and here you have a great Dynamic Range Database.

http://www.dr.loudness-war.info/

 

There is not much noticeable difference between a very good recording correctly stored as a .mp3 file and a very good recording correctly stored as a .flac file.

 

But recording quality is one of the most important links in the sound quality chain, together with headphones (or speakers).

 

Best Luck!

post #5 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by Me x3 View Post
 

Hi!

 

You should also consider Takstar Pro 80 or Gemini HSR-1000 (Same headphones). I don't know if you can buy them in your country.

 

Some people complain about confort on Shure's Srh-440.

 

Off-topic recommendation:

 

If you want to get the full potential of your listening experience, the best you can do is getting good recordings.

You can also read about " The Loudness War " and here you have a great Dynamic Range Database.

http://www.dr.loudness-war.info/

 

There is not much noticeable difference between a very good recording correctly stored as a .mp3 file and a very good recording correctly stored as a .flac file.

 

But recording quality is one of the most important links in the sound quality chain, together with headphones (or speakers).

 

Best Luck!

Good point and in regards to you Flacs...

 

give this article a read as well, 

http://www.whatinterviewprep.com/prepare-for-the-interview/

Read topics 1 2 3 4 and 6, again you could have a ".flac" that is actually an mp3 transcode. Meaning, some one took something small and made it bigger! So just imagine... that you have Pear, you first make your pear small, maybe chop it up nicely, then you decide you want the "entire pear again" If you put all those small pieces back toegether into a "big pear shapped object" is what you have despite being as big as a normal pear, is this Frank Fruit the same as the orignal fruit

 

no it is not

 

and with music the same applies, there is Losless and Lossy qualitys. Most music is recorded to "lossless" formats, which equates to the "whole pear", when you take that lossless file and compress it into a smaller file, such as going from PCM to Mp3, it is the same as "chopping up the pear" your small little pear chunks still taste and feel like a pear. Likewise the compressed music is still very much the same as it's uncompressed source. But if you take a compressed music file and uncompress it and transcode it back to lossless... well then u have a mess... like trying to put little pear bits back into the shape of the orignal fruit lol

 

That said, make sure your ".flacs" are actually lossless quality. If your flacs are actually transcoded from lossy then yea they are going to sound pretty terrible! 

post #6 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mshenay View Post
 

Good point and in regards to you Flacs...

 

give this article a read as well, 

http://www.whatinterviewprep.com/prepare-for-the-interview/

Read topics 1 2 3 4 and 6, again you could have a ".flac" that is actually an mp3 transcode. Meaning, some one took something small and made it bigger! So just imagine... that you have Pear, you first make your pear small, maybe chop it up nicely, then you decide you want the "entire pear again" If you put all those small pieces back toegether into a "big pear shapped object" is what you have despite being as big as a normal pear, is this Frank Fruit the same as the orignal fruit

 

no it is not

 

and with music the same applies, there is Losless and Lossy qualitys. Most music is recorded to "lossless" formats, which equates to the "whole pear", when you take that lossless file and compress it into a smaller file, such as going from PCM to Mp3, it is the same as "chopping up the pear" your small little pear chunks still taste and feel like a pear. Likewise the compressed music is still very much the same as it's uncompressed source. But if you take a compressed music file and uncompress it and transcode it back to lossless... well then u have a mess... like trying to put little pear bits back into the shape of the orignal fruit lol

 

That said, make sure your ".flacs" are actually lossless quality. If your flacs are actually transcoded from lossy then yea they are going to sound pretty terrible! 

 

It's always nice to keep those concepts fresh in mind! Thanks for sharing.

post #7 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by Me x3 View Post
 

 

It's always nice to keep those concepts fresh in mind! Thanks for sharing.

Yea forgive the possbily strange food imagery, but I have a very reputable music site, and I've gotten Loss to Lossless transcodes my self before... and they sounded horrorific! 

 

Audacity is a nice free program, and the visual differance in a Lossless Spectrum graph and a lossy is easy to tell apart! Again the whatcdprep site has some nice refrance material on teh subject! 

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