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UMG Audible Watermarking on Files in Apple iTunes Store - Page 3

post #31 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by Copperears View Post

I took a look at the waveform in my audio software (again, I'm very scrupulous about not publishing any copyrighted material online, not even in fair-use format, I've respected an industry which has failed to respect me at this point, my entire life; so I will not post a sample), and there's a very noticeable, regular fluctuation in the waveform that has nothing to do with anything in the actual recorded sound, which could well be an indicator of the presence of this watermark.
 

 

You're not really risking anything by posting a small sample.
In the very unlikely event of someone taking offence to the action, all that will happen is that Joe or some other administrator will notify you and remove the link.

 

I've got trouble with gaining access to my iTunes account, so I have no other way to really know what this artifact sounds like.

post #32 of 65
Thread Starter 
You don't need access to your account to preview a sample on iTunes; just find Elliott Carter's Clarinet Concerto, 2nd movement, Deciso, and listen to the preview. Or even more simply, the low-register note at the start of the Krystian Zimerman Chopin Ballades album.



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post #33 of 65
Thread Starter 
Ok more examples:

1. The Who, Quadrophenia, Polydor (owned by UMG): listen to the opening of the album, the sound of the ocean; it will sound like weird, fluctuating white noise, not at all like what it sounds like on either my LP or CD versions. Also the synth arpeggio section in the first instrumental track, the artifacts are so audible they make the pure synth tones sound out of tune!

2. Berlioz, Symphonie Fantastique, Haitink, Royal Concertgebouw, Deutsche Grammophon: solo oboe in this performance quite distinctly demonstrates the audible watermarking.

I'm beginning to realize this isn't just confined to classical music, but perhaps may be on everything that UMG releases digitally, or perhaps re-releases, as I don't hear it on Artpop, for instance.
Edited by Copperears - 11/19/13 at 11:04am
post #34 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by xnor View Post
 

@StudioSound: See, it has nothing to do with compression.

Perhaps in this case that is true, though compression can also cause similar warbling sounds.

 

This is really bad though.

post #35 of 65

Maybe... in some very very rare cases considering the bitrate.

post #36 of 65

This is really interesting.  Copperears, did you ever hear back from UMG?

post #37 of 65
Thread Starter 
Nope. Got a "we'll look into it" but that was a long while ago.

Have made sure Apple has a heads-up about this, with link to Matt's blog on the issue.
Edited by Copperears - 11/20/13 at 8:28am
post #38 of 65
Thread Starter 
Now I begin to understand why my kids' generation simply refuse to buy digital content.

They'll just find whatever they can find, free on the web, and enjoy it in whatever form it's in.

It's us older people used to paying for this stuff that are the suckers.



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post #39 of 65

Buy CDs. Rip them. Be happy.

post #40 of 65
Thread Starter 
CDs take space. Maybe rip 'em, sell 'em on, then?

Upon further thought: naaah.

I've spent about a decade away from spending any money on the music industry. Recently did a brief refresh of my collection. Have enough CDs to enjoy for the rest of my lifetime, for sure!

I'll let other people buy this watermarked crap.cool.gif
Edited by Copperears - 11/23/13 at 8:17pm
post #41 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by Copperears View Post

Now I begin to understand why my kids' generation simply refuse to buy digital content.
They'll just find whatever they can find, free on the web, and enjoy it in whatever form it's in.
It's us older people used to paying for this stuff that are the suckers.

 

For me, it at least explains why some people are happy to stream music off YouTube and other sites instead of buying it.

The quality sold on the iTunes store is crap, so why pay for crap when you can get it for free?

 

I don't understand why people don't buy CDs instead though.

Well, I suppose I do. Buying physical media feels so dated now, and newer computers often don't even have a CD drive to rip them.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Copperears View Post

CDs take space. Maybe rip 'em, sell 'em on, then?

 

In many countries now, you have the right to rip the CD and convert it to another format.

In some places that also extends to DVD and Blu-rays, but that's less common because you have to break DRM to do so.

 

I don't know of anywhere that it is legal to make a copy of the CD and then sell it, without destroying your format-shifted copy first.

I just buy the discs, rip them, and store them away out of sight.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Copperears View Post

I've spent about a decade away from spending any money on the music industry. Recently did a brief refresh of my collection. Have enough CDs to enjoy for the rest of my lifetime, for sure!

 

Sometimes I feel the same way. I definitely have a lot less interest in modern music which is highly compressed and sold in lossy formats.

Because albums now get split up and sold as individual tracks on services like iTunes, few bands actually make a good album that you want to listen to from start to finish any more.

I can't count the number of times where I have heard a track somewhere and really enjoyed it, bought the CD and found that it's the only good track on the album.

post #42 of 65

I support bands I like by buying their CDs, T-Shirts and other merch. These bands are not after landing one #1 hit in the charts plus some fill-ins to make up an album, but releasing great albums from the first to the last track.

Here's it's legally allowed to make a personal or backup copy (e.g. FLAC rip on the computer) but you have to own the original CD.

post #43 of 65
Thread Starter 
Had never thought about cd copyright and ripping as this has never been a problem for me until now.

I just prefer the convenience of iTunes, particularly as their Cloud functionality grows; the idea of having access to my whole collection, secured in the cloud, from any device, is just far more of an incentive than the idea of stocking up on yet more aluminum discs someone will have to get rid of some day.

There should be some way of solving this watermarking issue; I sincerely hope UMG will pay attention to it some day.
Edited by Copperears - 11/24/13 at 9:02am
post #44 of 65

You can rip a CD, then give the original CD to a friend for an "off site backup".

post #45 of 65
I assumed it was encoding artifacts also....sad that it's audible. I'm guessing this technology can also encode data onto the track, such as the purchaser of the music. Will be interesting to watch how this unfolds.
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