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post #136 of 1798

Realistically, how would you think this compares to the ODAC/O2 ? Definitely looks interesting.

 

I must say that the 'anti resonance feet' stretch goal looks a bit like voodoo


Edited by dclaz - 11/3/13 at 12:02am
post #137 of 1798
Quote:
Originally Posted by dclaz View Post

Realistically, how would you think this compares to the ODAC/O2 ? Definitely looks interesting.

I must say that the 'anti resonance feet' stretch goal looks a bit like voodoo

Probably better answered when people can actually listen to both units for comparison.
post #138 of 1798

My personal suggestion, though it is not listed on the poll, is that one of the S/PDIF inputs be used as an S/PDIF output. This would allow the Geek Pulse to be used as a USB to S/PDIF converter.

 

From all reports of the Resonessence Concero (which, in its "HP" guise is the most similar product available), it can serve as a USB to S/PDIF converter of similar quality to the under $500 dedicated converters.

 

Given lead designer Larry Ho's background, there would be few people in the world more qualified to work on the USB interface, so I would think the Geek Pulse could be made to perform this function better than most, even at the low price.

 

That would mean the Geek Pulse would have feature parity with the Concero HP (using the same DAC chipset etc.), with a much more powerful headphone amplification, and at a lower price.

 

Not to mention, potentially extending the useful life of the product and making it somewhat of a digital "Swiss Army Knife".

 

 

PS.  I also hope that the rechargeable SLA-battery pack is offered as an (extra cost) addition, even if they do not get to $500,000.  Getting a good supply of clean power is more than half the battle in making good sound. Most people would be surprised by how "dirty" their AC power truly is - especially around their computer equipment !


Edited by NinjaHamster - 11/3/13 at 1:49am
post #139 of 1798
Quote:
Originally Posted by Larry Ho View Post

Geek Pulse takes 12V DC input. So the regulator version will have switching power (universal, 110V ~ 240V. 50Hz ~ 60Hz)...

Linear power supply or battery will be even better. But that will depend on how good Indiegogo campaign goes.... ;-)


I do hope that you guys will stick with the mobile version dac. Else the battery draw may be too great for the sla battery pack to be really useful.

Btw, anyone know the dimension of the casing?

Sent from my Nexus 7 using Tapatalk 4
post #140 of 1798

Both 6.35mm and 3.5mm jacks is a good idea.

post #141 of 1798

It seems that Geek Pulse is going to be a Super DAC and headphone amplifier.

I was wondering if the power supply will be switching or linear.

A battery would probably improve sound quality, but at the expence of a specific battery lifetime, and probably a fast time from charged to discharged time.

Wouldn't it be simpler and better to create a linear supply and to further improve its' multistage isolated power instead even more (just like the DaVinci Dual DAC)? 

I also hope that the company will also put a HDMI in input on Geek Pulse, so that the DAC will be able to play DSD directly from a universal blue ray disc player/ DVD player.

Finally, playback directly from a USB stick connecting directly to the Geek Pulse would be nice, without the need for a computer's presence, so that someone could use Geek Pulse as a multi-purpose DAC, simply anywhere.

post #142 of 1798
Quote:
Originally Posted by music lover 2 View Post

It seems that Geek Pulse is going to be a Super DAC and headphone amplifier.
I was wondering if the power supply will be switching or linear.
A battery would probably improve sound quality, but at the expence of a specific battery lifetime, and probably a fast time from charged to discharged time.
Wouldn't it be simpler and better to create a linear supply and to further improve its' multistage isolated power instead even more (just like the DaVinci Dual DAC)? 
I also hope that the company will also put a HDMI in input on Geek Pulse, so that the DAC will be able to play DSD directly from a universal blue ray disc player/ DVD player.
Finally, playback directly from a USB stick connecting directly to the Geek Pulse would be nice, without the need for a computer's presence, so that someone could use Geek Pulse as a multi-purpose DAC, simply anywhere.

It will come with an external switching psu. If they hit $500k in funding they will include an SLA battery pack. A separate linear PSU is planned along with other components as a family of add ons. Your other suggestions are interesting but will likely be a very far stretch based on the cost of the device.
post #143 of 1798

I agree.  I would also prefer a rotary volume knob.

 

Mark

post #144 of 1798
standby mode is a terrible feature, if the DAC clicks in any way or the lock-on signal is slow, this will be a no-deal for me.
post #145 of 1798
Agree... Nobody wants a DAC that has clicks or any sort of noise whenever you hit pkay in your software, or changr sample rates, etc
post #146 of 1798
Quote:
Originally Posted by dclaz View Post
 

Realistically, how would you think this compares to the ODAC/O2 ? Definitely looks interesting.

 

I must say that the 'anti resonance feet' stretch goal looks a bit like voodoo

 

About the effect of isolation/resonance footers on audio components. Until about a month ago, I thought they are voodoo too, until I tried, and the effect was shocking (in the positive way).

 

I currently have a $600 set of footers under my $2k DAC :)

post #147 of 1798
Quote:
Originally Posted by travelfotografe View Post
 

 

About the effect of isolation/resonance footers on audio components. Until about a month ago, I thought they are voodoo too, until I tried, and the effect was shocking (in the positive way).

 

I currently have a $600 set of footers under my $2k DAC :)

I'd like to see the $600 footers. Magnetic levitation?

:popcorn:

post #148 of 1798
Quote:
Originally Posted by travelfotografe View Post
 

 

About the effect of isolation/resonance footers on audio components. Until about a month ago, I thought they are voodoo too, until I tried, and the effect was shocking (in the positive way).

 

I currently have a $600 set of footers under my $2k DAC :)

 

Subwoofers and vibration devices like Buttkickers use these to somewhat good effect. $6 of rubber feet are used for large enclosures that physically vibrate to accomplish this. Even then, they aren't truly needed. I have 4 under my 160lb dual opposed 18" subs.

 

Your $600 footers on a small device that does not physically vibrate, will do no better than rubber feet in isolation no matter how much you try to explain otherwise. Don't fall for snake oil devices.

 

http://www.parts-express.com/cat/case-cabinet-feet/3467

 

The more you know.


Edited by bhazard - 11/3/13 at 7:15pm
post #149 of 1798
Quote:
Originally Posted by brunk View Post
 

I'd like to see the $600 footers. Magnetic levitation?

:popcorn:

Diamond coated discs with ceramic ball bearings. A review: http://singaporehifi.blogspot.no/2012/08/darcz-footer.html

 

I first heard their effect at a hi-fi show, and I was pleasantly shocked. Found a 2nd-hand set for sale and I bought them knowing I can resell them if they do not work in my system.

 

Made by Ansuz Acoustics from Denmark. Sister company of Raidho Acoustics that make speakers with diamond coated cone drivers. Folks that buy LH's DaVinci DAC are very likely no strangers to accessories and equipment like these, and very often swear by them.

 

Anyway, lets not take this thread off topic. But I supported the Geek Pulse kickstarter in part because all the bonus items are interesting to me and I can see them being used in my both my speaker and headfi systems.


Edited by travelfotografe - 11/4/13 at 4:57am
post #150 of 1798
Quote:
Originally Posted by NinjaHamster View Post
 

My personal suggestion, though it is not listed on the poll, is that one of the S/PDIF inputs be used as an S/PDIF output. This would allow the Geek Pulse to be used as a USB to S/PDIF converter.

 

From all reports of the Resonessence Concero (which, in its "HP" guise is the most similar product available), it can serve as a USB to S/PDIF converter of similar quality to the under $500 dedicated converters.

 

Given lead designer Larry Ho's background, there would be few people in the world more qualified to work on the USB interface, so I would think the Geek Pulse could be made to perform this function better than most, even at the low price.

 

That would mean the Geek Pulse would have feature parity with the Concero HP (using the same DAC chipset etc.), with a much more powerful headphone amplification, and at a lower price.

 

Not to mention, potentially extending the useful life of the product and making it somewhat of a digital "Swiss Army Knife".

 

 

PS.  I also hope that the rechargeable SLA-battery pack is offered as an (extra cost) addition, even if they do not get to $500,000.  Getting a good supply of clean power is more than half the battle in making good sound. Most people would be surprised by how "dirty" their AC power truly is - especially around their computer equipment !

 

 

+1

So many people recognize the value proposition/upgrade path with the Concerno in this respect. Realizing they may want to upgrade the DAC section later but will still be able to use it as USB-SPDIF converter. I am surprised more manufactures/designers don't do this at the entry/mid level.

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