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The Great Grado Experiment (4 tonewoods tested, more to come!) - Page 13

post #181 of 220
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by 7keys View Post

It's Lapacho the cups I made for the Sens Driver.


Whoa awesome! Have you figured out if and what kinds of woods you're going to use in round two?
post #182 of 220
Quote:
Originally Posted by AHorseNamedJeff View Post


Whoa awesome! Have you figured out if and what kinds of woods you're going to use in round two?

The way it is now only Grado modders have the drivers and skills to test these cups out.   I want to figure out a way to include a driver in with this so any long time member could test out the tone-woods. I think the problem is that with time the solder points would break off and not everyone would be adept at soldering the cable back on. The trick would be figuring out a way of securing the cable on the driver so there would be no fear of the cable breaking off.

 

Then we do round two.

post #183 of 220
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by 7keys View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by AHorseNamedJeff View Post

Whoa awesome! Have you figured out if and what kinds of woods you're going to use in round two?
The way it is now only Grado modders have the drivers and skills to test these cups out.   I want to figure out a way to include a driver in with this so any long time member could test out the tone-woods. I think the problem is that with time the solder points would break off and not everyone would be adept at soldering the cable back on. The trick would be figuring out a way of securing the cable on the driver so there would be no fear of the cable breaking off.

Then we do round two.
I could think of a method for attaching the two units, lemme brain storm.
post #184 of 220

hot glue... or if you really want them to never come off JB weld them to the back of the driver.

post #185 of 220
Quote:
Originally Posted by kvtaco17 View Post
 

hot glue... or if you really want them to never come off JB weld them to the back of the driver.

Yes, I'll work on it.

post #186 of 220

I've got the cups now. I've had limited listenings with multiple cups over the last couple weeks so I'm dedicating my Saturday morning to a good sit down with em.

 

Will post my thoughts this evening.

post #187 of 220

Very cool thread, subscribed :cool:

post #188 of 220
Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeDoe View Post
 

I've got the cups now. I've had limited listenings with multiple cups over the last couple weeks so I'm dedicating my Saturday morning to a good sit down with em.

 

Will post my thoughts this evening.

You're already an expert on tone wood cups Joe. You know what most of these woods sound like.

post #189 of 220
Quote:
Originally Posted by 7keys View Post
 

You're already an expert on tone wood cups Joe. You know what most of these woods sound like.

Well thank you sir! I don't know if I'm an expert, but in any case, getting to hear them all side by side is totally different. 

post #190 of 220

Here we go:

 

 

 

 

Source: MacBook Pro running Fidelia to a Hifimediy U2 Async DAC. 

 

Songs:

Come On, Come Over by Jaco Pastorius - 24 bit remaster. This tune has a lot going on. Very active bass line (duh), several drum/percussion instruments, vocals, and horns. Really tests a headphone's separation and detail retrieval.

 

Someone Like You by Adele (Live) - ALAC. This is a great one for vocals as its just Adele and a piano. It also really can show off soundstage as she has the audience sing two choruses.

 

Limit to Your Love by James Blake - MP3 320. Two words: Sub-bass.

 

Back in Black by AC/DC - ALAC. If there is one thing Grado's do well, it's rock. And this song is rock.

 

Drivers: SR225i

 

After limited, isolated listening sessions, I decided to listen to the cups in pairs (maple/birch, cherry/walnut) as those sound the most similarly to me. The maple and birch shared some qualities and in general performed inferiorly to the walnut and cherry. 

 

Birch: Overall, I'd say birch had an upper hand in its mids/highs. They were always very detailed and offered good separation. The Pastorius tune really tests separation and soundstage. However, their bass wasn't anything to write home about. It was present, but usually light and dry. Not enough to even sound natural to me. AC/DC didn't have the usual weight throughout the guitars and male vocals. Bottom line for birch: good details, bad boom.

Maple: Maple gave me some of the bass I was missing, but it was muddy and too round. The mids were okay at best, once again, a little muddy. Birch definitely bests the maple in treble and airiness as the maple just didn't get up there without getting peaky. (Granted my source components have a ever so slight warmth to them). Bottom line for maple: boring.

 

Cherry: Cherry was quite refreshing after listening to the first two. The bass was fuller and the highs were still nice and detailed. The mids were nice and lush, however, sometimes seems a bit behind the bass/treble. Soundstage and separation were on par with birch. Bottom line for cherry: An excellent all-rounder, as all songs were presented satisfactorily.

Walnut: My favorite. Walnut had thicker and deeper bass than cherry, especially on the James Blake tune. The mids were very musical and only just behind the bass. Highs were always clear although the birch and cherry had more airiness. Bottom line for walnut: Not the most neutral, but definitely enjoyable. 

 

Bonus Coverage:

Lapacho:  7keys sent me a pair of his Lapacho cups (SUPER-hard tonewood to work with) to test along with the GGTE batch. Bass quantity and quality were better than the walnut! Very surprised here. Mids were thicker than walnut. Highs were very clear. Soundstage and separation were the best of all cups. Bottom line for Lapacho: I ended up buying these from 7keys outright!

 

 

Final thoughts:

 

If I have to pick one from the GGE bunch, it would be walnut with cherry being a close second. Maple just did not impress. Birch was an excellent can for details but lacked the low end punch I've come to like from the likes of the 325 and RS1.

 

Notes:

 

https://www.dropbox.com/s/am8gh9nkvh8a7d2/GGTE.pdf

 

PS. Here are the impressions I posted several weeks ago in a different tonewood thread with some of the same woods:

 

Walnut: Improvements all around. Better bass quality, richer mids, more detailed treble, better soundstage.

 

Ebony: Bass texture is better, unchanged mids, much more treble sparkle/separation. Also better soundstage.

 

Maple: More bass but at cost of texture, muddier kids and loss of treble detail.

 

Oak: V-shaped. Rounder bass, slightly recessed mids, better treble.

 

Cherry: Ebony-ish bass, richer mids, unchanged treble. Much improved imaging and soundstage.

 

Padauk: Little more oomph in the bass, unchanged mids, better treble space. Deeper soundstage..


Edited by JoeDoe - 3/1/14 at 11:38am
post #191 of 220

Nice review Joe.

 

I liked the Lapacho also, that's why I sent them out to you. I wanted to see how they stacked up against the competition.

 

Lapacho is my absolute favorite tone-wood............................ this month.  :smile:

post #192 of 220
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by 7keys View Post

Nice review Joe.

I liked the Lapacho also, that's why I sent them out to you. I wanted to see how they stacked up against the competition.

Lapacho is my absolute favorite tone-wood............................ this month.  smile.gif
Wonder how ironwood would do wink.gif that is, if you could craft cups out of it.
post #193 of 220

...I was toying with the idea of Lignum Vitae actually...its a rather dense, heavy wood, that used to be used to make bearings in submarines for their propeller mechanisms...its too heavy to float....

 

If I play my cards right it might also be used to make some Thunderpants style cups for some T50rp drivers...

post #194 of 220

Top five hardest woods in the world

 

Wood hardness is rated on the Janka scale. The Janka hardness test measures the resistance of a type of wood to withstand denting and wear. It measures the force required to embed an 11.28 mm (0.444 in) steel ball into wood to half the ball's diameter.

 

Lignum vitae

#1 - Lignum vitae (4500)

Lignum vitae is a trade wood, known in Europe as pockenholz. This wood was once very important for applications requiring a material with its extraordinary combination of strength, toughness and density. Lignum vitae is hard and durable, and is also the densest wood traded; it will easily sink in water.

 

 Angico, Kurupayra

#2 - Angico, Kurupayra (3840)

Kurupayra, coming from the same family as Pepperwood, is incredibly durable with one of the highest Janka hardness ratings of 3,840. The vibrant wood features a reddish brown heartwood with yellow tones. The warming fusion of the red-browns and yellow creates a cozy feeling in any room and goes particularly well with white decor.

 

 Ipe

#3 - Ipê (3684) (Lapacho)

Ipe is an incredibly durable wood. Its dense cell structure serves as a natural deterrent to insects, decay, and molds. Because of this natural resilience Ipe is often the first choice for decking because of its almost unparalleled ability to stand up to the elements. More than just durable, Ipe is also very pleasing to the eye. Its heartwood is light to dark olive brown with contrasting yellowish-grey or grey brown tones accompanying it. With a Class A fire rating, Ipe occupies the same class of fire-retardant materials as steel. For durability, safety, and beauty, Ipe makes an excellent choice.

 

 Cumaru

#4 - Cumaru - Brazilian Teak (3540)

Brazilian Teak, called Cumaru in South America, is a wood whose natural tones vary from yellowish tan to more muted medium brown to darker sienna. Brazilian Teak is a dense and hardwood, and combined with its vibrant beauty, its strength and durability keep this wood among the top three choices in exotic hardwood flooring.

 

 Ebony

#5 - Ebony (3220)

Ebony is a very dense black wood. Ebony has a very high density and will sink in water. Its fine texture, and very smooth finish when polished, have made it very valuable as an ornamental wood. Ebony has a long history of use, with carved pieces having been found in Ancient Egyptian tombs.

 

Some say a wood from the Philippines is the hardest wood  "Magkuno" or "Iron Wood".

post #195 of 220
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by 7keys View Post

Top five hardest woods in the world



 



Wood hardness is rated on the Janka scale. The Janka hardness test measures the resistance of a type of wood to withstand denting and wear. It measures the force required to embed an 11.28 mm (0.444 in) steel ball into wood to half the ball's diameter.



 



Lignum vitae



#1 - Lignum vitae (4500)



Lignum vitae is a trade wood, known in Europe as pockenholz. This wood was once very important for applications requiring a material with its extraordinary combination of strength, toughness and density. Lignum vitae is hard and durable, and is also the densest wood traded; it will easily sink in water.



 



 Angico, Kurupayra



#2 - Angico, Kurupayra (3840)



Kurupayra, coming from the same family as Pepperwood, is incredibly durable with one of the highest Janka hardness ratings of 3,840. The vibrant wood features a reddish brown heartwood with yellow tones. The warming fusion of the red-browns and yellow creates a cozy feeling in any room and goes particularly well with white decor.



 



 Ipe



#3 - Ipê (3684) (Lapacho)



Ipe is an incredibly durable wood. Its dense cell structure serves as a natural deterrent to insects, decay, and molds. Because of this natural resilience Ipe is often the first choice for decking because of its almost unparalleled ability to stand up to the elements. More than just durable, Ipe is also very pleasing to the eye. Its heartwood is light to dark olive brown with contrasting yellowish-grey or grey brown tones accompanying it. With a Class A fire rating, Ipe occupies the same class of fire-retardant materials as steel. For durability, safety, and beauty, Ipe makes an excellent choice.



 



 Cumaru



#4 - Cumaru - Brazilian Teak (3540)



Brazilian Teak, called Cumaru in South America, is a wood whose natural tones vary from yellowish tan to more muted medium brown to darker sienna. Brazilian Teak is a dense and hardwood, and combined with its vibrant beauty, its strength and durability keep this wood among the top three choices in exotic hardwood flooring.



 



 Ebony



#5 - Ebony (3220)



Ebony is a very dense black wood. Ebony has a very high density and will sink in water. Its fine texture, and very smooth finish when polished, have made it very valuable as an ornamental wood. Ebony has a long history of use, with carved pieces having been found in Ancient Egyptian tombs.



 



Some say a wood from the Philippines is the hardest wood  "Magkuno" or "Iron Wood".


I vote these five to be used in round 3 if there is one.
I think round 2 should be the more famous tonewoods, mahogany, cocobolo, and others like that.
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