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NAD Viso HP20 In-Ear - Page 2

post #16 of 41

After 12 more hours on the iTunes burn-in, the NADs sound pretty much the same. However, with the Comply tips the harshness is largely eliminated, at the expense of clarity I am afraid. Using a Matisyahu track, Chop 'Em Down from the Live at Stubbs CD, there is a bit if harshness in the recording (vocal) using the stock tips, not bad but it's there. With the Complys, not an issue. It's gone.

 

I won't rush returning these phones, because I want to be fair. But right now, unless they change dramatically with 50+ hours of burn in, I am just not in love with the sound signature, again considering the pedigree. And you are right, the form factor is also a distraction. I like wearing on the go in-ears over the ear, not hanging down. I will tolerate using the Trumpets that way because the cable is very thin, though it is also flat. But the NAD flat cable is much thicker, as are the driver housings themselves, so over the ear is clunky alternative. Not really workable.

 

I'm stumped. I am not saying the NADs are bad, not at all. They sound okay, but they just don't move me. As for comparison with the Trumpets, the Trumpets are less reverby, flatter, but I just prefer the sound/fit combo right now as I have all along. Also, I know the Tributes had a nice warm signature, but the the Trumpets are not warmish phones in that vein. They just seem very balanced to me. I know they get mixed reviews on the Net, but some people"get" them, some don't. Again, it could be fit. I am lucky in that I get a great fit with the stock medium silver tips. I think they are a hidden gem at their $150 price, but again, that could just be my ears.

 

One other thing, listening to the Beatles Anthology version of "Something," the amazing stripped down Harrison demo track, the vocal sounds a bit plasticky on the NADs, a trait that I noticed out of the box on other tracks. Again, not a very good characterization, but it's the best I can do. Something about the vocal/treble does not sound natural (and the NADs are touted as mimicking a live performance).

 

As far as the NADs being a neutral phone, I switched over the Ety ER4P I have on hand, and that's neutral to me. The NAD bass sounds more bloated/present. And with the Etys, not a hint of plasticky sounding treble, just clean and sharp with the usual Ety sound signature. Now, I typically use the Etys with a P to S cable and an iPod Classic/amp with bass boost (not my iPhone in the ER4P form), but even using them HP out on the iPhone, I prefer them over the NADs.

 

I will give the NADs 30+ hours on the burn in cycle and if they remain the same (needing the Comply tips to sound their best, which is not all that great), I will be boxing them up and shipping them back to Amazon. Oh well, it happens.

post #17 of 41

@mymymyopie Like you, I'm not an audiophile either, so A-B comparisons are out of the question for me. Just don't have the articulate ears for it, nor enough coal in the fire to go back and forth with audio consumers. That being said, I'm intereted in this type test and how it held wait in your decision to return the headphones. On first listen on xmas, I found my HP20s to be a natural type of sound, nothing exaggerated or boosted, just pure good sound - is this what you weren't crazy about? Do you prefer speakers/headphones that mock up the lows and highs? I heard Monster and Beats by Dre can be guilty of that. 

 

Also, curiosity again, what's the purpose of burning-in ear buds? Do you really think it is necessary for headphones - like will my headphones sound different after 40+ hours of listening??? 

post #18 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by tomscy2000 View Post
 

 

Man, these initial thoughts don't do NAD any favors. From the way it looks, ergonomically, I don't like the HP20. But I had high hopes for the sound signature --- I had it pegged as a possible winner in the neutral category. Perhaps you're a little more used to a smoother, more relaxed top end (not idea if the Trumpets are that way)?

 

Good point @tomscy2000, no favors here. I'm not overly familar with NADs older, golden hi-fi gear but I think these headphones are good for the price. What do you mean by sound signature? From my audio nerd friends have told me, NAD has never frilled up their sound quality, just plays music like it was recorded - no?

post #19 of 41
Thread Starter 

I had a very quick listen to the HP20, and I have to basically agree with mymymyopie; it's kinda neutral overall, but it just doesn't sound that great. The mid-highs and treble are very thin compared to the slower, thicker bass. While the bass isn't bloated, it's not quick and sounds a little disjointed compared to the mids and highs, making the treble feel a little tinny. They're not bad by any means, but next to the HP50, the HP50 sounded amazing, and the HP20 were just average.

post #20 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by blackmetal88 View Post
 

@mymymyopie Like you, I'm not an audiophile either, so A-B comparisons are out of the question for me. Just don't have the articulate ears for it, nor enough coal in the fire to go back and forth with audio consumers. That being said, I'm intereted in this type test and how it held wait in your decision to return the headphones. On first listen on xmas, I found my HP20s to be a natural type of sound, nothing exaggerated or boosted, just pure good sound - is this what you weren't crazy about? Do you prefer speakers/headphones that mock up the lows and highs? I heard Monster and Beats by Dre can be guilty of that. 

 

Also, curiosity again, what's the purpose of burning-in ear buds? Do you really think it is necessary for headphones - like will my headphones sound different after 40+ hours of listening??? 

Sorry for the delayed response. I can't even hardly remember the NADs any more, but I do know they were not worth the price of admission to me. Still jamming the MD Trumpets, in fact, and I think I am a microdriver fan. I also just ordered the Aurisonics Rockets at $129 on Kickstarter, just for shall we say, kicks?

The $129 option is gone, but still for $149. They are supposed to MSRP for $249, but not out until March.

 

Anyway, I am still using the Trumpets, happily, for that price range they sound best to me. I also recently bought some FAD Heaven IIs, but they are not iPhone equipped. Love the sound with the right tips, and they are closer to $100, and to me much preferred over the NADs as well.

post #21 of 41

@tomscy2000 I'll agree with you there... HP50s are definitely better-sounding headphone, but that would only make sense for over-ear vs. in-ear.

post #22 of 41

@mymymyopie I'll have to hear these Miles Davis' Trumpets from Monster - but ugh Monster. It's hard to get past the name; over-priced, over-marketed. Thanks for the banter though! 

post #23 of 41

Got a pair of these in today...  They are similar to the HP50 in some ways, but actually quite bassy, interestingly enough :p  Just had a few minutes with them, so take it with a grain of salt.
 

EDIT: Take it back, they are much bassier than the HP50 and don't have that warmth that the HP50 gave XD  These are a bit more dynamic overall though, which is a good thing. Treble quantity is, like with the HP50, a little reserved, but also a little more edgy. They have a very beautiful midrange presentation though, and the bass is respectable the majority of the time.  It can get a little unforgiving at times though. 


Edited by tinyman392 - 2/1/14 at 9:25am
post #24 of 41
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tinyman392 View Post  Take it back, they are much bassier than the HP50 and don't have that warmth that the HP50 gave XD  These are a bit more dynamic overall though, which is a good thing. Treble quantity is, like with the HP50, a little reserved, but also a little more edgy


Bolded sections are why the HP20 isn't in the same league as the HP50... :o  The bass isn't the main culprit here, but rather the treble --- it's thin and lacking in refinement.

post #25 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by tomscy2000 View Post
 


Bolded sections are why the HP20 isn't in the same league as the HP50... :o  The bass isn't the main culprit here, but rather the treble --- it's thin and lacking in refinement.

 

I'll agree with the bass and the treble.  However, regarding the warmth (midrange warmth), I feel the HP20 does it a little more accurate than the HP50.  The HP50 were a little too warm for me in the midrange.  As I listen to them a little more, they do grow on you.  But yeah, the treble is still an issue, as is the bass (it's a little colored). 

 

Comfort is a mixed bag.  It is possible to wear them over the ear, but then there is some pain in the ear canal due to the angle of the tips and the strain relief.  If you wear them down, they are comfortable. 


Edited by tinyman392 - 2/1/14 at 10:32am
post #26 of 41
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tinyman392 View Post  I'll agree with the bass and the treble.  However, regarding the warmth (midrange warmth), I feel the HP20 does it a little more accurate than the HP50.  The HP50 were a little too warm for me in the midrange.  As I listen to them a little more, they do grow on you.  But yeah, the treble is still an issue, as is the bass (it's a little colored). 


Personal preferences, I guess. I prefer a warmer midrange if everything else is in step, especially for cans. The HP20 sounded as though there are early break-up resonance nodes that make the treble sound thin --- no idea how they really perform from a measurement perspective, though. All I could say was that I had high hopes going into the audition, and while the HP50 met those expectations, the HP20 fell well short. The audition was short, however, and in a pretty loud show environment. Against the UERM, which I A/Bed against the HP20, both through the D1050 on the show floor, the HP20 also came well-short of my hopes for a reasonably neutral response in a <$150 IEM.

post #27 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by tomscy2000 View Post
 


Personal preferences, I guess. I prefer a warmer midrange if everything else is in step, especially for cans. The HP20 sounded as though there are early break-up resonance nodes that make the treble sound thin --- no idea how they really perform from a measurement perspective, though. All I could say was that I had high hopes going into the audition, and while the HP50 met those expectations, the HP20 fell well short. The audition was short, however, and in a pretty loud show environment. Against the UERM, which I A/Bed against the HP20, both through the D1050 on the show floor, the HP20 also came well-short of my hopes for a reasonably neutral response in a <$150 IEM.

 

Definitely a little far from neutral...  Mainly because of the bass though :/  I'm only able to measure frequency response with my cheap DIY system unfortunately. 

 

post #28 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by tinyman392 View Post
 

 

Definitely a little far from neutral...  Mainly because of the bass though :/  I'm only able to measure frequency response with my cheap DIY system unfortunately. 

 

These don't have too much appeal but I'm curious... does the bass creep into the mids?  How do female voices sound (texture)?

post #29 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by Deviltooth View Post
 

These don't have too much appeal but I'm curious... does the bass creep into the mids?  How do female voices sound (texture)?

 

The bass is boomy in nature, I don't feel it creeps into the mids, if it does, it's not too much due to the way that the bass is still able to successfully separate itself apart from the other instrumentals.  The vocals do have some depth to them, but the focus on vocals is the upper vocals, so female voices will be on the thinner side rather than the lusher side. 

post #30 of 41

So lately I have been considering buying a pair of these as a secondary pair for listening on the go. I already own a pair of PSB M4U2 which I love and use for everything (music, TV/movies and gaming), and seeing as these are designed with the same RoomFeel (which, from what I understand is all about EQ tuning) tech, the sonic character (and here's the caveat) should appeal to me. I live in a country with cold winters, so a mid priced pair of IEM:s would be great for when I am wearing a cap to protect against the cold. I haven't been able to try them out yet, as local stores have (for obvious reasons) are not demo:ing these IEM:s.

 

How do these stand up to, say Shure SE215/315? Those are the alternatives I am looking at so far. I'm looking for something in the way of mostly neutral, yet musical sounding phones. That is how I'd like to describe my M4U2:s, neutral with a tad warmth and very pleasant in character.

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