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Carbon nano

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 

Don't know if it has been posted here, but I found it interesting.

http://science.slashdot.org/story/13/09/30/2213245/new-headphones-generate-sound-with-carbon-nanotubes

post #2 of 9

Doesn't JVC have a line of products based on carbon nanotubes already? HA-FXD60/70/80 etc.?

post #3 of 9

JVC HA-S500 & HA-S400

post #4 of 9
JVC HA-S500's are just incredible, believe the hype and check out the Appreciation Thread.

CNT FTW!
\m/ biggrin.gif \m/
post #5 of 9
Thread Starter 

Didn't know that.  I will have to check them out.

post #6 of 9

The headphones JVC is offering have nothing to do with the news tipo posted. (Btw, iirc this was already posted a few months ago..)  JVC's headphones use normal dynamic drivers. All they're saying is that they use a different material (probably labeled by the marketing department as "carbon nanotubes"). The S500 have a difficult frequency response...

 

Carbon nanotube drivers (as in the news article) do not have any moving parts and produce sound through oscillating temperature changes.

 

 

vs.

 


Edited by xnor - 10/1/13 at 3:16am
post #7 of 9

Oops My Bad...

 

Just got caught up the the JVC hype. :D

post #8 of 9

My bad. What with the attention to the JVCs and some mentions of wow-burn-in-must-be-different-on-these, I assumed they actually had to have a non-dynamic driver. Guess what that made out of u (and especially me).

 

So as for producing sound waves with temperature control... as I figured, the article says that the efficiency is low. They don't produce much sound pressure for the input electric power. I wonder if the linearity and properties change significantly with the ambient temperature.

post #9 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by mikeaj View Post

 

So as for producing sound waves with temperature control... as I figured, the article says that the efficiency is low. They don't produce much sound pressure for the input electric power.

Indeed, we don't know how low the efficiency is, but in-ear drivers with lower than normal (BA, dynamic drivers) efficiency could still be quite usable. Just have to turn up the volume a bit more like with on/over ear headphones.

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