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Something not discussed much -- Room acoustics

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 

For the longest time my stereo gear has been in my living room.   Wood floors and a little bit of furniture, kind of open floor plan.  I've owned an NAD receiver for a longtime, as well as a high en Sony ES series.  I didn't use the Sony because it was to high-fi sounding and I would get ear fatigue even with a flat eq.  I use Dali Lektor 3 bookshelf speakers and a sub.  The NAD was it typical warm neutral tone.  Recently since I have a 2 year old, and I have started school full time and work full time, I moved into my guitar room that is quite smaller and I have spot treated it with 2' x 4' panels of 2" OC703 Acoustic Foam with fabric covers on al 4 wall to absorb the standing waves.  Since I moved in, I've felt the NAD, although sounding great, was a tad dark and lacking some clarity.  I just pulled that sony back out, an I have to tell you it's a different animal now. I get the same balance now as I get with the DT880's.  Any way, the OC703 it great stuff and with a little bit of work to frame them and cover them goes a long way for room acoustics,

post #2 of 16

I really doubt the amp would have any kind of effect on room acoustics. It's most likely the distance the speakers stand out from the wall, the distance between you and the speakers or the distance from the back of your listening position to the rear wall.

 

Also, it might be a difference in the floor in the two rooms. Does one of them have a rug and the other doesn't?

 

Most problems that don't involve reflections are caused by placement of the speakers... either too far apart, too close to the wall or having the back wall right up against where you listen. Better to have some space behind you and behind your speakers.

post #3 of 16

Moving your loudspeakers just a couple of inches can easily make a 5-10dB difference in the low end..

post #4 of 16

I've had my gear between the speakers on racks, and behind the racks is a window. I have various room treatments.

 

When I had my speakers wide apart - some 12' say, I never noticed a problem - this gave me a wide but flat image. Lately I've been trying the 'thirds' set up (speakers and ears one third into the room, and speakers also one third from side wall) in order to add depth to the sound. This gave me some advantages but was noticeably harsh. Eventually I realised that there were reflections off the gear and window which caused this harshness.

 

I moved the racks to a side wall and placed a pair diffusors in the centre of the wall. That knocked around 3dB off the volume, reducing the harshness and allowing more bass whilst still keeping the positives of the speaker locations.

 

This tells me that gear location, particular if between the speakers, can affect the sound.

 

I still can't fathom out where sound of such energy comes from to hit between the speakers/window as I have acoustic panels behind my chair and at side wall reflection points.

 

Edit. In fact this probably has nothing to do with this thread but is interesting nonetheless!


Edited by Hipper - 10/1/13 at 11:14am
post #5 of 16

Windows are always a bit of trouble. Windows behind the middle of the soundstage is even worse. I bet your system sounds pretty good now.

post #6 of 16

It does thanks, although on at least one album that I'm fond of there is still some harshness, so there's still a bit of experimenting to do. I feel I've broken the back of it though.

 

I've always wanted speakers to give the detail of headphones with the freer soundstage of speakers. I think I'm approaching that. As I've always been told that's not possible my current situation is very satisfying.

post #7 of 16

I find absorption material somehow addictive, at first I was making 2" thick panels. When I played few of my first songs and noticed the increased 3Dness +tighter bass, soon I was making 4" panels. Now i'm planning on getting even more absorption material.

 

It would be so awesome to get to listen to some proper studio monitors in actual studio environment. How would it sound like? Is it really "too analytical" for listening like people say?


Edited by Headzone - 10/2/13 at 7:12am
post #8 of 16
Considering it's a headphone site, room acoustics does take a back seat. Because the vast majority of people can't dedicate a room for music, compromises are the norm. A living room is the gathering room and serves many functions. I think a majority of purchasers are disappointed when they buy that great sounding system from the showroom and find it's not what they heard once at home. They give more resources to cables than treatments. The problem is in analyzing their environment and taking the necessary steps to improve it. To do that, you either need some education on acoustics or you pay to have it done. Neither are high priority for most.
post #9 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Happy Camper View Post

Considering it's a headphone site, room acoustics does take a back seat. Because the vast majority of people can't dedicate a room for music, compromises are the norm. A living room is the gathering room and serves many functions. I think a majority of purchasers are disappointed when they buy that great sounding system from the showroom and find it's not what they heard once at home. They give more resources to cables than treatments. The problem is in analyzing their environment and taking the necessary steps to improve it. To do that, you either need some education on acoustics or you pay to have it done. Neither are high priority for most.

 

eww

 

really glad I'm just a headphone guy >.> fiddling with Room Acoustice ugh that sounds like fun xD 

post #10 of 16
You can actually set up a room that is both livable as a living room AND sounds good. It just requires careful placement of upholstered furniture. A couch can prevent reflections real good!
post #11 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mshenay View Post
 

 

eww

 

really glad I'm just a headphone guy >.> fiddling with Room Acoustice ugh that sounds like fun xD 

 

It is really rewarding though. Unlike things like, changing cables.

post #12 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Headzone View Post
 

 

It is really rewarding though. Unlike things like, changing cables.

 

I can imagine xD

 

although maybe one day 20 years from now I can get a speaker set up! 

post #13 of 16

just took my Genelecs off the stands and placed them directly on my desk. Put some books under the speakers, so the acoustic axis of the speaker was directly at my ear leveL

 

They sound much better this way for some weird reason?! Voices sound much more realistic, and I can hear alot more texture. Soundstage is also more 3D like. I can also hear the reverb/sound of the room where vocals etc were recorded very easily.

 

I wonder if the front wall interfered with the sound or something, or why does it sound so much better now..

 

post #14 of 16

Perhaps you are hearing more of the speakers and less of the room, almost like large headphones.

 

What you have on your desk is the nearfield set up.

 

Most equipment is reasonably good at retrieving the sound and delivering it to the speakers. It's what happens after it leaves the speakers that is the problem.

post #15 of 16

Yeah, but It's the same listening distance that I had earlier. The stands were located at about 1.5 meter high just behind the desk, so weird that the change is so huge.

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