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Want to use two of my BOSE Accoustimass speakers with my computer

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 

I've got some BOSE Accoustimass 10 speakers lying around and no way to connect them to my computer.

 

Looking for a cheap solution, just a receiver that could output a decent wattage and connect to the computer via a 3.5mm cable.

 

Thanks.

post #2 of 19
Bose Acoustimass speakers depend on the Acoustimass bass module for all midbass. Unless you have a subwoofer that can crossover REALLY high with those Bose cubes, you are likely to be disappointed in the sound. I understand that the Bose cube speakers have a low end of only 280hz. Hard to find a subwoofer to pair with that.
post #3 of 19

Subwoofer for midbass? That sounds terrible.

post #4 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by blueangel2323 View Post

Subwoofer for midbass? That sounds terrible.

You mean, as opposed to all the crappy desktop multimedia 2.1 systems that depend on a cheap sub for midbass wink.gif

smily_headphones1.gif
post #5 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by cel4145 View Post


You mean, as opposed to all the crappy desktop multimedia 2.1 systems that depend on a cheap sub for midbass wink.gif

smily_headphones1.gif

 

That's why they're crappy ;)

Are there any cheap 2.1 or even 2.0 systems with real deep bass?

post #6 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by blueangel2323 View Post

That's why they're crappy wink.gif

LOL
Quote:
Originally Posted by blueangel2323 View Post

Are there any cheap 2.1 or even 2.0 systems with real deep bass?

I would doubt it. Lot of those use small bass drivers, where it would be difficult to achieve usable deep extension and higher midbass frequencies for cheap. I bet a lot of those desktop multimedia speaker subs even grossly exaggerate their bass extension in their specs, too. Tends to happen a lot with budget small (and large) home audio subs. Definitive Technology rates their ProSub 600 (8" drive) as 22 Hz – 150 Hz. Independent measurements show it to be -6db at 34hz and probably never reaches 22hz. LOL

Then for 2.0, look at the Audioengine A2s. Only reason it sounds like it has bass is because they built a boost into the amp:
Quote:
However, the Audioengine2's amplifier does include equalization; fig.2 shows that it gradually boosts the output below 2kHz, reaching a maximum amplification of +9dB between 40 and 100Hz. The boost decreases to +4dB at 10Hz, but the 2.6"-diameter woofer will be driven into high excursions by music having anything much in the way of subsonic content.

So it's going to sound like crap if you actually try to listen to it with bass heavy music, and certainly you can't boost it some more. LOL
post #7 of 19

I have an old Logitech 5.1 gaming speaker system that's rated at 280W RMS (560 peak) and the specs were surprisingly honest. They rated the lower limit of the subwoofer at 35Hz, and it sounds pretty much full power by 40Hz.

 

The EQ curve for the A2s looks pretty disgusting but apparently it sounds quite neutral. If they were to build in EQ, I don't see why didn't start the bass boost much lower instead of bloating the mids. And I would've tuned the bass port to no higher than 60Hz. But all in all, I'd say bass performance looks really impressive for a tiny 2.75" woofer.

post #8 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by blueangel2323 View Post

I have an old Logitech 5.1 gaming speaker system that's rated at 280W RMS (560 peak) and the specs were surprisingly honest. They rated the lower limit of the subwoofer at 35Hz, and it sounds pretty much full power by 40Hz.

Could also be room interaction exciting the lower frequencies. I think that's what most of the manufacturers tend to bet on when they overestimate sub low end performance.
Quote:
Originally Posted by blueangel2323 View Post

The EQ curve for the A2s looks pretty disgusting but apparently it sounds quite neutral. If they were to build in EQ, I don't see why didn't start the bass boost much lower instead of bloating the mids. And I would've tuned the bass port to no higher than 60Hz. But all in all, I'd say bass performance looks really impressive for a tiny 2.75" woofer.

I had wondered why they boosted the lower mids, too. Maybe it just sounded better?

Certainly, the A2 does seem to do well at producing bass considering the limitations of a 2.75" driver. Although I think most people buying the A2s don't realize that a larger driver speaker will do much better for midbass.

Maybe I'm just biased now with 6.5" driver speakers having worked my way up from Klipsch Promedia to 4" driver speakers, then 5" before the ones I have now. I won't buy small driver speakers any more smily_headphones1.gif
post #9 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by cel4145 View Post

Bose Acoustimass speakers depend on the Acoustimass bass module for all midbass. Unless you have a subwoofer that can crossover REALLY high with those Bose cubes, you are likely to be disappointed in the sound. I understand that the Bose cube speakers have a low end of only 280hz. Hard to find a subwoofer to pair with that.

 

I never said I was looking for a subwoofer.

 

I need some sort of receiver/amp solution for 2 speakers.

post #10 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tracker View Post

I never said I was looking for a subwoofer.

I need some sort of receiver/amp solution for 2 speakers.

I understood that.

It would be a waste of money to buy a receiver to go with those without a sub, and most subs won't work them. A $100 pair of computer speakers will likely sound better.
post #11 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by cel4145 View Post


I understood that.

It would be a waste of money to buy a receiver to go with those without a sub, and most subs won't work them. A $100 pair of computer speakers will likely sound better.

 

These speakers were very expensive when they were purchased. How could a cheap pair of computer speakers sound better? Explain.

 

Worst case scenario, I could get a PC sub/reciever and connect the BOSE speaker to it. Only catch is, it would need a high wattage.

post #12 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tracker View Post

These speakers were very expensive when they were purchased. How could a cheap pair of computer speakers sound better? Explain.

Most consumers don't realize that you grossly overpay when you buy Bose Acoustimass speaker setups. I've talked with speaker designers who have explained that the actual value/manufacturing costs of the drivers in those Bose cubes is only a few dollars. Plus, as I already explained, the Bose cubes have been measured to have maybe a 280hz low end. That means NO midbass of any kind. Male vocals (or voices) will probably sound bad without the Acoustimass module to accompany it.

I just looked at your posting history and see you used to have Creative G500 speakers. Ever listen to those without the subwoofer on? The Bose will cut off even more of the bass frequencies. Some bass guitar notes will be lost.

If you are handy with a computer, download Audacity. Load a song you like. Select the whole song. Choose high pass filter from under the Effects menu. Set the roll off to 24 db and the frequency to 250hz. Save that new version of the song and listen to it on your headphones. That's what the cubes will likely sound like in terms of missing music frequencies without the Acoustimass module.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tracker View Post

Worst case scenario, I could get a PC sub/reciever and connect the BOSE speaker to it. Only catch is, it would need a high wattage.

Only it would be difficult--and probably expensive--to find a sub that can extend up high enough to crossover with the Bose cubes. Be a lot cheaper to just get yourself some different speakers to listen to. Andrew Jones Pioneer SP-BS22 would sound very nice, better than the cubes.
Edited by cel4145 - 9/30/13 at 3:49pm
post #13 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by cel4145 View Post

Most consumers don't realize that you grossly overpay when you buy Bose Acoustimass speaker setups. 

 

Yes, these speakers were purchased when I was 10. It wasn't until I began visiting this site, becoming a novice audiophile and purchasing my HD 600's that I realized the truth about BOSE speakers.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by cel4145 View Post

Plus, as I already explained, the Bose cubes have been measured to have maybe a 280hz low end. That means NO midbass of any kind. Male vocals (or voices) will probably sound bad without the Acoustimass module to accompany it.

 

So, you're saying that these particular speakers were simply designed to only be used with a subwoofer?

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by cel4145 View Post

I just looked at your posting history and see you used to have Creative G500 speakers. Ever listen to those without the subwoofer on? The Bose will cut off even more of the bass frequencies. Some bass guitar notes will be lost.

 

Yes, I've turned the subwoofer off from time to time. Usually, I just keep it on the lowest setting and crank the treble up, so I'm not really a bass-phile.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by cel4145 View Post

Only it would be difficult--and probably expensive--to find a sub that can extend up high enough to crossover with the Bose cubes. Be a lot cheaper to just get yourself some different speakers to listen to. Andrew Jones Pioneer SP-BS22 would sound very nice, better than the cubes.

 

Well, if I absolutely need a subwoofer, then the only option would be a sub/amp combo. I don't know why it wouldn't crossover.. I've been using the G500 sub with the BOSE speakers and it's been fine.

 

But you're saying that I should use bookshelfs instead because they don't require a subwoofer to sound good, is that it? I already own bookshelf speakers - Polk Audio Monitor 30's.

 

Only problem is, I need this to sit on a small desk, so they'd have to be satellites. Also, this wouldn't solve my amp problem, which is the reason I originally started this thread.

post #14 of 19
Well, if you understand what you will be missing and still want to power them, then you need to research and find out what the impedance rating is of the Bose cubes. If in the 6 or 8 ohm range, pretty much any receiver will work.
post #15 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by cel4145 View Post

Well, if you understand what you will be missing and still want to power them, then you need to research and find out what the impedance rating is of the Bose cubes. If in the 6 or 8 ohm range, pretty much any receiver will work.

 

Okay, but I don't want something big or expensive.

 

Is there any way of getting around the lack of bass without going straight to a bookshelf? Perhaps a small sub?

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