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Sony MDR-7520 - Page 87

post #1291 of 1668
Quote:
Originally Posted by msflsim View Post
 

Hi guys

If anyone has the coiled cable that came with the 7520 they dont use/want to get rid off let me know!

I need another cable for the studio.

 

Im located in the UK btw

Just a gentle bump regarding the above.

 

looking for the coiled 7520 cable, name your price, im in the UK.

 

Thanks! :)

post #1292 of 1668
Quote:
Originally Posted by xanlamin View Post

7520 is definitely an upgrade from K550. There is only 1 complaint which I have for the 7520 and that is sibilance.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by soullinker20 View Post

Yeah. That sibilance.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike F View Post
 

I wonder, is that the same sibilance that people complain about with the HD800 - the one that's revealed if it's on the recording.................?

 

 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Beagle View Post
 

 

I heard the sibilance last night....in the lower treble.

 

 

Listening for it, I heard it on one track...it was absent from the next two tracks.

On a different recording, again it was "off" and "on".  (Female vocalist)

 

Two things:

1. I think that these are incredibly revealing headphones,

way beyond the norm.  

2. They do have a very slight tendency towards sibilance.


Edited by zazex - 4/7/14 at 4:06am
post #1293 of 1668
Quote:
Originally Posted by zazex View Post
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Listening for it, I heard it on one track...it was absent from the next two tracks.

On a different recording, again it was "off" and "on".  (Female vocalist)

 

Two things:

1. I think that these are incredibly revealing headphones,

way beyond the norm.  

2. They do have a very slight tendency towards sibilance.

It depends on the recording not the headphone. There are many microphones that are very sibilance to the human voice because of the proximity effect. The fact that some tracks have it and some do not tells me it is the recording that is the problem not the headphone. You had to have good quality recordings with good microphone techniques in the first place before making judgments on equipment elsewhere in the chain.

post #1294 of 1668
Quote:
Originally Posted by john57 View Post
 

It depends on the recording not the headphone. There are many microphones that are very sibilance to the human voice because of the proximity effect. The fact that some tracks have it and some do not tells me it is the recording that is the problem not the headphone. You had to have good quality recordings with good microphone techniques in the first place before making judgments on equipment elsewhere in the chain.

Couldn't agree more. The 7520 just reveals recording flaws, it doesn't create sibilance out of thin air. I guess it just means that a lot of music is badly recorded (but that's not news).

post #1295 of 1668

Or if the artist intends for it to sound that way.  I'm thinking of you Patricia Barber and you too Diana Krall.

post #1296 of 1668
Quote:
Originally Posted by zazex View Post
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Listening for it, I heard it on one track...it was absent from the next two tracks.

On a different recording, again it was "off" and "on".  (Female vocalist)

 

Two things:

1. I think that these are incredibly revealing headphones,

way beyond the norm.  

2. They do have a very slight tendency towards sibilance.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by john57 View Post
 

It depends on the recording not the headphone. There are many microphones that are very sibilance to the human voice because of the proximity effect. The fact that some tracks have it and some do not tells me it is the recording that is the problem not the headphone. You had to have good quality recordings with good microphone techniques in the first place before making judgments on equipment elsewhere in the chain.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by starfly View Post
 

Couldn't agree more. The 7520 just reveals recording flaws, it doesn't create sibilance out of thin air. I guess it just means that a lot of music is badly recorded (but that's not news).

 

 

Yes, it's definitely an issue with recordings,

and I didn't mean to suggest otherwise.

 

What's not quite as clear is if it's also an issue with

the playback system, or any part of it - such as headphones

(other than being revealing of faults in the recording process).

 

______________

 

There's a great deal of discussion about this on various

studio recording forums and elsewhere - for example:

 

http://www.ilounge.com/index.php/articles/comments/clarifying-and-troubleshooting-sibilance/
http://forums.naimaudio.com/topic/sibilance-with-naim-kit

http://www.recordingreview.com/blog/glossary/sibilance/

http://prorecordingworkshop.lefora.com/topic/19403740/Any-sibilance-tricks?page=4

http://www.gearslutz.com/board/high-end/507694-sibilance-21th-century.html)

post #1297 of 1668
Quote:
Originally Posted by john57 View Post
 

It depends on the recording not the headphone. There are many microphones that are very sibilance to the human voice because of the proximity effect. The fact that some tracks have it and some do not tells me it is the recording that is the problem not the headphone. You had to have good quality recordings with good microphone techniques in the first place before making judgments on equipment elsewhere in the chain.

I completely agree. I am able to hear some sibilances on the 7520's I couldn't detect on my Focal Cms50 Monitors BUT hear again on my macbook pro HP's... 

post #1298 of 1668
Quote:
Originally Posted by john57 View Post
 

It depends on the recording not the headphone. There are many microphones that are very sibilance to the human voice because of the proximity effect. The fact that some tracks have it and some do not tells me it is the recording that is the problem not the headphone. You had to have good quality recordings with good microphone techniques in the first place before making judgments on equipment elsewhere in the chain.

 

I did swap the stock coiled cable for one of the NuForce cables and the treble did open up and smooth out a bit. But you are right, it is likely recording-dependent because it is not consistently there..

post #1299 of 1668
Quote:
Originally Posted by Darner View Post... If you want to spend more money, look at the Rode MiCon-8, which is a 3.5mm jack with a locking thread, and I'm pretty sure it will fit, because the threads on the headphone seem to be the same setup as the threads on the Sony UWP wireless microphone series (where the lavalier mic plugs into the transmitter). The Rode MiCon-8 is the high-end jack for that application, with those Sony mics. ...

I just wanted to say I was totally wrong about this. The MiCon-8 is fine on the locking (plug) side, but it's proprietary on the other end, meaning it's an adaptor (3.5mm locking male to Rode proprietary), and not a standard plug connector where you solder a cable into it. Just wanted to say this, since the info I posted as a suggestion would have misled someone to the wrong thing.

post #1300 of 1668
Quote:
Originally Posted by Darner View Post

Typhoon I think the 7520's are great for that kind of music, which is mostly what I listen to (90's death, black, thrash, and some older and more recent stuff as well). They're extremely comfortable, no issues for me, and don't need an amp but can get even fuller with one, in my experience. As for the cord, it's true that it's a coiled pain, but that's only if you don't like coils, which I don't.



 



I'd say don't go to Amazon, but get a high-quality 3.5mm-to-3.5mm cable from a Chinese maker. Some of those small hi-fi outfits in China are doing great work. You can find them on eBay with a little searching. For $12 shipped, I'm getting a custom-length Canare (Japanese-made) cable with a Pailiccs jack on the HP end, and a smaller Chinese-subcontracted Neutrik jack on the source end. It's basically a combination of the D11 and D02 model from this guy, without the fabric sheathing so that it's more flexible:



 



http://www.ghentaudio.com.



 



If you email the company, you'll be talking with the guy himself, and he's great. And $12 is less than some of the lower-quality mass-produced cables on Amazon.



 



I love the 7520's.


 



Have you gotten that cable from Ghent Audio yet? If so, does it fit the 7520?

Thanks
post #1301 of 1668
Quote:
Originally Posted by campj View Post  Have you gotten that cable from Ghent Audio yet? If so, does it fit the 7520?

Yes, just yesterday. It's very well made, and high-quality, but not right for the 7520s. Lots of microphonics, and too heavy and thick. I was so focused on the diameter of the plug on the HP side that I neglected the length of it. The Pailiccs plug housing sticks down too far from the HP, which isn't good because if it were ever to get knocked by something, it would transmit that force directly into the jack that's fixed into the HP. As opposed to the Sony connector housing which is so short that only the cable would get knocked. Ah, my rookie mistakes! So yes, it fits, but it totally doesn't work.

 

I've been reading, it's become a mission unfortunately. I think I'll try stripping the sheilding and jacket from the cable, and just using 3 of the 4 shelded copper conductors to do a braid. Then I'll have to figure out something again on the HP end. Or I might use a leftover Fostex cable, which I like the feel of, and put a connector on it. For the price of an average cable, a workable soldering iron's probably a better investment for me at this point.

 

At the bottom of all this, there is one culprit. I mean aside from the guy who designed the 7520s and Z1000s and said to himself, "Hey, I know, I'll use a very hard-to-get connector scheme from the world of expensive broadcast electronics!" And I have finally identified the culprit, damn him to hell:

 

http://pro.sony.com/bbsc/ssr/product-K1324/

 

Luckily, there are cheaper (under $5) options, if you search for "Sony UWP locking jack." Oh man...

post #1302 of 1668

used my 7520 on a trip to bend for 5 days and it sounded great.

post #1303 of 1668
Quote:
Originally Posted by bixby View Post
 

Or if the artist intends for it to sound that way.  I'm thinking of you Patricia Barber and you too Diana Krall.

Just listened to Diana Krall earlier and yes she loves to accentuates those "Ss", but I didn't suffered from it, even a bit. Not what I would call bothering sibilant.

Actually it sounded so good on the 7520, so well recorded, so much details revealed from her voice on those cans, a pure joy.

 

Here is one of the tracks I use to test sibilance on headphone

 

All I can say is that the 7520 just reveal what's present it doesn't emphasize sibilance or "suffer" from sibilance, I rarely encounter it using them, it is totally recording dependent.


Edited by ForceMajeure - 4/9/14 at 10:59pm
post #1304 of 1668
Hi,
Does anyone know if the 7520s have more detail than the AKG K701s?
Also, do the 7520s have less bass than the MDR 1Rs? I thought those had way too much bass when I auditioned them.
Cheers!
post #1305 of 1668
Quote:
Originally Posted by ForceMajeure View Post
 

Just listened to Diana Krall earlier and yes she loves to accentuates those "Ss", but I didn't suffered from it, even a bit. Not what I would call bothering sibilant.

Actually it sounded so good on the 7520, so well recorded, so much details revealed from her voice on those cans, a pure joy.

 

Here is one of the tracks I use to test sibilance on headphone

 

All I can say is that the 7520 just reveal what's present it doesn't emphasize sibilance or "suffer" from sibilance, I rarely encounter it using them, it is totally recording dependent.

+1

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