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You are a skilled headphone DIY'er. I have cash. Let us help each other. - Page 3

post #31 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by seanwee View Post
 

When compared to ?

 

Turtle Beach gaming headphones ? Maybe.

 

Good Value Low-Mid-fi headphones (HD 558)? REALLY pushing it.

 

HI-Fi headphones (AKG Quincy Jones)? Impossible.

 

Actually.... i just wanted to post in this legendary thread. :P

I obviously can't say anything concrete as it was a demo at an event, but honestly I think it was at least as good as the HD598's audio. 

 

Actually, in a response on Reddit, Palmer Luckey himself said that it was on par with level of quality you would get on something like an AD700. Considering they have full control over the whole audio stack from DAC to driver, it's entirely possible they also have a very even frequency response. I heard honestly surprising amounts of bass from what I remember. The imaging and soundstage was insanely accurate, but that's hard to compare because you also get headtracking, meaning you get more sound localization cues. 

 

Other than sound quality, what separates an integrated audio solution on a VR HMD from just wearing normal headphones on top, is that you get the ultimate comfort. There is minimal to zero clamp on your ears because the force is distributed by the semi-rigid strap system. Imagine if you were never wearing headphones at all and sound magically just came into existence next to your ears. That's how comfortable it is. That also means your brain is much more easily convinced that the sound isn't coming from an artificial source like headphones.

post #32 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pazz View Post
 

I obviously can't say anything concrete as it was a demo at an event, but honestly I think it was at least as good as the HD598's audio. 

 

Actually, in a response on Reddit, Palmer Luckey himself said that it was on par with level of quality you would get on something like an AD700. Considering they have full control over the whole audio stack from DAC to driver, it's entirely possible they also have a very even frequency response. I heard honestly surprising amounts of bass from what I remember. The imaging and soundstage was insanely accurate, but that's hard to compare because you also get headtracking, meaning you get more sound localization cues. 

 

Other than sound quality, what separates an integrated audio solution on a VR HMD from just wearing normal headphones on top, is that you get the ultimate comfort. There is minimal to zero clamp on your ears because the force is distributed by the semi-rigid strap system. Imagine if you were never wearing headphones at all and sound magically just came into existence next to your ears. That's how comfortable it is. That also means your brain is much more easily convinced that the sound isn't coming from an artificial source like headphones.

Seems like i underestimated it.................. the price of the oculus was somewhat misleading...........

post #33 of 35

So, did Oculus VR actually use any Head-Fiers suggestions in the end? Or did they figure it out on their own / got help somewhere else?

post #34 of 35

Instead of focusing on band placement, why not use some sort of tension system on the headband to manage the pressure of the earcups?

 

For starters lets consider a pneumatic system consisting of a hand-pump, a push-to-connect switch, and a cylinder. We'll be using negative pressure.

 

In order to adjust the tension you can allow air into the system by pressing the push-to-connect switch, and then release air by pumping it out of the system. the negative pressure in the cylinder makes the headband flex outwards just enough to release pressure on the ears.

 

 

 

Of course, we will need someone who can design a manual pneumatic pump small enough to fit on a pair of headphones.

 

EDIT: Seems i'm behind here...


Edited by ThePCWizard - 2/14/16 at 2:52pm
post #35 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by ThePCWizard View Post
 

Instead of focusing on band placement, why not use some sort of tension system on the headband to manage the pressure of the earcups?

 

For starters lets consider a pneumatic system consisting of a hand-pump, a push-to-connect switch, and a cylinder. We'll be using negative pressure.

 

In order to adjust the tension you can allow air into the system by pressing the push-to-connect switch, and then release air by pumping it out of the system. the negative pressure in the cylinder makes the headband flex outwards just enough to release pressure on the ears.

 

 

 

Of course, we will need someone who can design a manual pneumatic pump small enough to fit on a pair of headphones.

 

EDIT: Seems i'm behind here...

Its already in production so............

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