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Philips Fidelio L2 - Page 46

post #676 of 684

To me the L2 has a tad more bass than neutral. I don't need more than that, so it is fine for me.

 

There hasn't been any detailed comparison with the X2 but the consensus is that the X2 is bassier. So perhaps it would be better for you. I didn't find the HD598 to significantly lack bass when I listened to them briefly.

post #677 of 684

ljokerl comment from CES 15:

 

Speaking of the Fidelio L2, it sounded excellent – very clear with nice deep bass and crisp treble. Not the flattest headphone, but a very lively and energetic sound that seemed to hit the right balance between “audiophile-acceptable” and “consumer-friendly”. Definitely worth checking out for those after this type of can.

 

vs:

 

The on-ear Fidelio M1 didn’t do quite as good a job at keeping the bass out of the way and didn’t appear as crisp and articulate overall, but considering both the closed-back form factor and the fact that it can be had for as low as $80 (amazon.com), it sounded quite good.

 

Coming from the far less expensive (but admittedly open-back) Fidelio L2, the A5 Pro didn’t seem all that clear or resolving.

 

Aside:

 

The Fidelio F1 is a new model (slated for a spring 2015 release) a small, closed-back on-ear portable with a low-profile form factor more akin to an Audio-Technica ATH-ES700 . The cups of the F1 are metal, with a smooth matte finish, and the whole thing feels extremely solid (perhaps even a touch hefty) in the hand, yet is quite comfortable to wear. The sound of the F1 had a good amount of bass impact (not unlike the M1) and produced a smooth, pleasant sound. It reminded me of the Klipsch Reference On-Ear, which happens to share the $200 price point with the new Philips, but I was more impressed with the sonics of the F1. These could end up being very nice no-frills portable headphones.

post #678 of 684

The L2 hasn't been getting a lot of head time because of my acquisition of the Focal Spirit Pro (new toy syndrome). To be completely fair, the FSP is amazingly neutral and colourless but it has the constraints of typical closed back headphones but I just put on the L2 for the first time in two weeks and wow. It's coloured relative to the Pro but the colouration plus the soundstage is just amazing. 

 

Compared to the Alpha Dog, the L2 is less natural in terms of timbre. It's a funner but less 'reference' sound. The Alpha Dog is surely a better headphone with better sound quality but there's no denying how amazing the L2 is considering the price. 

 

The Philips Fidelio L2 is still my top pick for those who want to get into (headphone) hi-fi at a relatively mid or lower price. I'd pick it over the Focal Spirit Pro, Focal Spirit Classic, NAD HP50, Sennheiser MOMENTUM, Master & Dynamic MH40, Sennheiser HD600, and Sennheiser HD650. The HD6X0s do have the L2 beat by a little in terms of timbre and soundstage width (not depth) but the L2 pulls ahead in other aspects including scalability. I have yet to hear the Philips Fidelio X1 and X2. 

 

Great technicalities albeit the not completely reference tuning coupled with minimal source and amp requirements yet great scalability make the Fidelio L2 my top pick. 

post #679 of 684

Still loving mine. Only thing that I've come to find slightly problematic is that the depth (NB: not wideness or layering, those are still great) of the soundstage is in some albums rather limited. I have not yet quite figured out what causes this, but I suspect it is because many albums are mastered for playback over speakers and that there it helps with achieving stereo sound. May also be a trick of philips to make the stereo on track stand out more.
Anyone else sharing this impression?

post #680 of 684
Quote:
Originally Posted by wolfjeanne View Post
 

Still loving mine. Only thing that I've come to find slightly problematic is that the depth (NB: not wideness or layering, those are still great) of the soundstage is in some albums rather limited. I have not yet quite figured out what causes this, but I suspect it is because many albums are mastered for playback over speakers and that there it helps with achieving stereo sound. May also be a trick of philips to make the stereo on track stand out more.
Anyone else sharing this impression?


I find the standard pop album and even the jazz albums I have to have great depth with the L2 relative to other my headphones save for the Alpha Dog, very coherent and projected centre image. I experience what you're describing with certain The Beatles tracks. Try fiddling with the fit as well as pushing the L2 a little forward (your ears resting on the back end of the earcups. This makes the soundstage a little deeper by assisting the angled drivers. 


Edited by maricius - 2/23/15 at 4:01am
post #681 of 684
Quote:
Originally Posted by maricius View Post
 


I find the standard pop album and even the jazz albums I have to have great depth with the L2 relative to other my headphones save for the Alpha Dog, very coherent and projected centre image. I experience what you're describing with certain The Beatles tracks. Try fiddling with the fit as well as pushing the L2 a little forward (your ears resting on the back end of the earcups. This makes the soundstage a little deeper by assisting the angled drivers. 

I thought the L2 could have sounded better on certain Beatles tracks. So later when I had the chance, I tried them on the HD600 expecting an improvement in the vocals but alas they were only marginally better. So the takeaway for me, is not to use those tracks for critical listening, just listen and enjoy it for what it is. On well recorded or audiophile tracks the L2 really excels.

 

I think the popular Sennheisers tend to the spread the centre image over a larger area which is another reason why vocals can sound pleasing on them. The HD598 do this even more and this will work very well with certain tracks but I think there are downsides. By comparison, the L2 is more precise in imaging and has more control of the midbass, unlike the 598. Yes, the L2 is warm but the midbass is well judged and does not impede clarity, even in faster music. Also, as ljokerl noted the bass does go deep. I can easily hear the bass in the videos posted in the X2 thread so probably the only difference is the X2 has more of it.

post #682 of 684
Quote:
Originally Posted by Head1 View Post
 

I thought the L2 could have sounded better on certain Beatles tracks. So later when I had the chance, I tried them on the HD600 expecting an improvement in the vocals but alas they were only marginally better. So the takeaway for me, is not to use those tracks for critical listening, just listen and enjoy it for what it is. On well recorded or audiophile tracks the L2 really excels.

 

I think the popular Sennheisers tend to the spread the centre image over a larger area which is another reason why vocals can sound pleasing on them. The HD598 do this even more and this will work very well with certain tracks but I think there are downsides. By comparison, the L2 is more precise in imaging and has more control of the midbass, unlike the 598. Yes, the L2 is warm but the midbass is well judged and does not impede clarity, even in faster music. Also, as ljokerl noted the bass does go deep. I can easily hear the bass in the videos posted in the X2 thread so probably the only difference is the X2 has more of it.


I agree with your thoughts on the Sennheiser. I believe the word you're looking for is intimacy. The HD598 sounds more open and can be wider than a not fully scaled HD6X0. The HD598 can't compete with the HD6X0s depth though. The HD598 are very pleasant for vocal and tracks that require intimacy. I think their subbass rolls off too early/doesn't extend nearly as much as the L2. 

post #683 of 684
Quote:
Originally Posted by maricius View Post
 


I agree with your thoughts on the Sennheiser. I believe the word you're looking for is intimacy. The HD598 sounds more open and can be wider than a not fully scaled HD6X0. The HD598 can't compete with the HD6X0s depth though. The HD598 are very pleasant for vocal and tracks that require intimacy. I think their subbass rolls off too early/doesn't extend nearly as much as the L2. 

Yes, intimacy is a good description and I think their customers come to expect that or see that as the norm. With the HD700 people were complaining (in the thread) about the midrange/vocals being recessed when all that happened was Sennheiser put the centre image in front rather than wrapped around the head. To me the 700 mids and vocals are moderately warm and clear even if they do not surround you. 

post #684 of 684
Quote:
Originally Posted by Head1 View Post
 

Yes, intimacy is a good description and I think their customers come to expect that or see that as the norm. With the HD700 people were complaining (in the thread) about the midrange/vocals being recessed when all that happened was Sennheiser put the centre image in front rather than wrapped around the head. To me the 700 mids and vocals are moderately warm and clear even if they do not surround you. 


I thoroughly enjoyed the HD700 with my iDSD except for an issue with a treble spike which was unbearable in some music. I do wish Sennheiser would create that musical HD650 x HD800 cross we've been waiting for. Kudos to them for still not having any direct competition for the HD800 in technicalities. 

 

If the HD700 did not have that peak, it would be the closest to a direct upgrade to the L2. 

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