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What am I hearing? (help out a new guy?)

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 

Hello, so i have been recently listening to different set of IEMs and a HD558 so I can learn to differentiate between good sounding headphones IEM and lower quality ones. I have been listening to Elvis Presley's Stuck On you, May It Be from lord of the rings.

 

What i noticed is that on my Sony sound monitoring IEM (sry forgot the exact model) whenever there is any pronunciation starting with "S" such as "stuck on you" I'll hear a hiss sound, while my HD558 does't sound like that, so my question is what do call that hissing? sine wave? distortion? is that what you guys call high sound too?

 

I can tell the difference but I just totally fail at finding the proper terms and words to describe what I hear, it's sad really  :(

 

I have tried googling but to no avail, I have read a page which tell me which one is high mid and low on the piano which does not help me at all even though I am a pianist because most of the songs I hear are way more complex with different instruments and vocals so it's next to impossible to tell which one is at what frequency, sadly I have no real life audiophiles to teach me either.

 

Also the starting vocal part of "May It Be"is that consider high or mid? and also why does my Sony IEM sound really clear when it comes to vocals especially in May It Be whereas my HD558 sound really soft in most of the songs in LOTR, I am guessing it's the impedance of a full side headset which requires an amp or just more power.

 

I have just tested my theory and my headset felt more powerful playing LOTR songs on my PC, so I was right about the impedance.Also btw I was hoping someone can recommend me some songs which I can easily distinct the lows mids and high on a song by telling at which part of the song does it sound like low, mid and high frequency. Thank you

 

Also tmr I am getting a tube amp most probably the Bravo Ocean AMP for my PC so i am gonna test it out over there, so any songs u recommend for testing with different headphones and amps? 

 

sry for long post but I am just trying to learn audio. :P 

post #2 of 9
Quote:

Originally Posted by chee006 View Post

 

What i noticed is that on my Sony sound monitoring IEM (sry forgot the exact model) whenever there is any pronunciation starting with "S" such as "stuck on you" I'll hear a hiss sound, while my HD558 does't sound like that, so my question is what do call that hissing? sine wave? distortion? is that what you guys call high sound too?

 

It is called sibilance, and is probably because the IEM has some peak(s) in the 5-10 kHz octave. But it can also be present because of bad music production.

post #3 of 9

That's called "sibilance" - here's what it is in the more general terms, here's what it is in terms of pro audio (ie how to avoid it when recording). When it comes to playback, the most common sources of it is when you have timing errors in hearing the soundwaves, most usually with multi-driver (a tweeter and a midwoofer at minimum) systems. Depending on where the crossover point is, and how the room* affects the soundwave, you can hear the sound from one or more driver later than the others making it seem longer and usually sharper (it's in microseconds but can still be significant), or they can have excessive reflections that reinforce the "SSS." Frequency response of course can also add to this, but from my experience room modes (effects) tend to be the usual culprit than the speakers themselves.

 

For headphones and IEMs, the "room" is all but totally eliminated - there's still some space between the driver and your ears (or eardrums). In a multi-driver IEM for example even if you tune the chamber to have all drivers blowing into the same spout, there's still a chance that those timing errors can occur. Take note that single driver designs are not immune (even the best Fostex full-range drivers can have this, ditto head/earphones). Obviously you won't have the room-reflections to deal with as well as the DSP to minimize it (see note below), but assuming there isn't a spike in the response (hard to measure vs speakers in a bad room and a well-controlled room) at the very least try different tips (length, material, etc) and the EQ. The tips can have a broader EQ effect, like Complys affecting most high frequencies, while a good EQ (in the player, or in a multi-purpose device, built into some music player programs/apps) should be able to zero in on that range. Try playing around with reducing at 3.5khz to 5khz, try different settings (effect width, center freq, etc) if it's one of the more complex parametric EQs on programs like Neutron Media Player (on Android).

 

 

 

 

 

*"Room" here is used more liberally; aside from a listening room at home, consider a car audio system. A car's cabin is one of the least ideal places to listen in - you sit off to one side, the drivers aren't placed in the ideal positions, the steering wheel and center column/tunnel are in way, too cramped reflections are unavoidable even for narrow dispersion speakers, etc - but people do it for the challenge.IASCA and EMMA (just Google those) actually hold competitions for that, so it's not true that most professional car audio is trying to blow your windshield off with whatever sub you can fit in there. Custom installs angle the drivers for more precise imaging that works with the dispersion width of the drivers used, aiding in centering the vocals in the middle of the dash, minimizing reflections, etc. They also generally have DSP processors that can assign a time delay on the drivers closest to the listener, usually the driver of the vehicle (and generally makes it sound worse on the passenger side), although in some events you have two judges sitting in front and points for passenger side listening can be significant.

post #4 of 9
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by stv014 View Post

 

It is called sibilance, and is probably because the IEM has some peak(s) in the 5-10 kHz octave. But it can also be present because of bad music production.

thx for the info, however I dun think it's the audio production as I was playing a 24-bit FLAC which was taken from a DVD-A but then agn I was playing on my iphone using a free FLAC player so will test this out later on my PC.

 

I agree more on that the IEM has a limit hence why it has that sibilance. 

post #5 of 9
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ProtegeManiac View Post

That's called "sibilance" - here's what it is in the more general terms, here's what it is in terms of pro audio (ie how to avoid it when recording). When it comes to playback, the most common sources of it is when you have timing errors in hearing the soundwaves, most usually with multi-driver (a tweeter and a midwoofer at minimum) systems. Depending on where the crossover point is, and how the room* affects the soundwave, you can hear the sound from one or more driver later than the others making it seem longer and usually sharper (it's in microseconds but can still be significant), or they can have excessive reflections that reinforce the "SSS." Frequency response of course can also add to this, but from my experience room modes (effects) tend to be the usual culprit than the speakers themselves.

 

For headphones and IEMs, the "room" is all but totally eliminated - there's still some space between the driver and your ears (or eardrums). In a multi-driver IEM for example even if you tune the chamber to have all drivers blowing into the same spout, there's still a chance that those timing errors can occur. Take note that single driver designs are not immune (even the best Fostex full-range drivers can have this, ditto head/earphones). Obviously you won't have the room-reflections to deal with as well as the DSP to minimize it (see note below), but assuming there isn't a spike in the response (hard to measure vs speakers in a bad room and a well-controlled room) at the very least try different tips (length, material, etc) and the EQ. The tips can have a broader EQ effect, like Complys affecting most high frequencies, while a good EQ (in the player, or in a multi-purpose device, built into some music player programs/apps) should be able to zero in on that range. Try playing around with reducing at 3.5khz to 5khz, try different settings (effect width, center freq, etc) if it's one of the more complex parametric EQs on programs like Neutron Media Player (on Android).

 

 

 

 

 

*"Room" here is used more liberally; aside from a listening room at home, consider a car audio system. A car's cabin is one of the least ideal places to listen in - you sit off to one side, the drivers aren't placed in the ideal positions, the steering wheel and center column/tunnel are in way, too cramped reflections are unavoidable even for narrow dispersion speakers, etc - but people do it for the challenge.IASCA and EMMA (just Google those) actually hold competitions for that, so it's not true that most professional car audio is trying to blow your windshield off with whatever sub you can fit in there. Custom installs angle the drivers for more precise imaging that works with the dispersion width of the drivers used, aiding in centering the vocals in the middle of the dash, minimizing reflections, etc. They also generally have DSP processors that can assign a time delay on the drivers closest to the listener, usually the driver of the vehicle (and generally makes it sound worse on the passenger side), although in some events you have two judges sitting in front and points for passenger side listening can be significant.

Thanks for replying, your first paragraph makes sense to how impedance happen but in my case I believe that it's because of my IEM limit as my other IEM, Shure 215 and HD558 barely showed any sign of impedance if any at all, especially my HD 558.

 

I was testing all of these out on my iphone Flac player though so there was no EQ for me to play around, however I am aware that it's recommended to equalize your headphones but I am not sure how to as I have tried following two guides on this site but both are complicated. The first guide is out of date and the second one is incomplete. But I have played around abit and have just decided to listen at a neutral sound EQ for now so i can hear exactly as it was recorded, to also train my ears. However I'll see what else I can do but I don't really care about my Sony IEM as I am just using them to help me listen better as my HD 558 is fantastic and has none of these symptoms.

 

Agn I really appreciate your help. :D

post #6 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by chee006 View Post

thx for the info, however I dun think it's the audio production as I was playing a 24-bit FLAC which was taken from a DVD-A but then agn I was playing on my iphone using a free FLAC player so will test this out later on my PC.

 

That's no guarantee. Some audiophile-labelled CDs have bad tracks. Use Google, I kinda remember consistently negative reviews about some Telarc discs that came out mid-2000s. Rebecca Pidgeon's Spanish Harlem on some compilation albums is also somewhat sibilant. Disable time alignment on my car and it's unlistenable, borderline painful; but of course on my home system (HD600) it sounds a bit natural, more like how she pronounces it than the recording or the system, but there's still a hint that the way it was recorded (maybe how close she is to the mic, etc) also contributes.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by chee006 View Post

 

I agree more on that the IEM has a limit hence why it has that sibilance. 

 

It's possible also that the HD558 could be softening and smoothing it over too much (does not necessarily mean the IEM isn't doing anything detrimental) but it makes for a stark contrast, whereas if there was some flaw in the recording but you're using a headphone/IEM closer to the midpoint between them, that flaw would be obvious but not necessarily grating.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by chee006 View Post

Thanks for replying, your first paragraph makes sense to how impedance happen but in my case I believe that it's because of my IEM limit as my other IEM, Shure 215 and HD558 barely showed any sign of impedance if any at all, especially my HD 558.

 

I'm not sure what you mean, I never mentioned nor connected it to impedance, but to what happens to the soundwave after it leaves the transducer diaphragm - it bounces off a wall (or your dashboard and windshield), you hear the reflection microseconds after the direct soundwave, most audible effect time delay problem is the "ssssss" and "TTT." Or you hear the left tweeter followed by the left woofer then the right tweeter then the right woofer - delays are in microseconds so you don't hear four out of sync speakers overall, but can manifest in the sssssss and TTT.

 

It can happen that too low impedance can push an amp too far and produce distortion, but it can't be so specific as to make only for grating treble with no audible distortion elsewhere.

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by chee006 View Post

 

I was testing all of these out on my iphone Flac player though so there was no EQ for me to play around, however I am aware that it's recommended to equalize your headphones but I am not sure how to as I have tried following two guides on this site but both are complicated. The first guide is out of date and the second one is incomplete. But I have played around abit and have just decided to listen at a neutral sound EQ for now so i can hear exactly as it was recorded, to also train my ears. However I'll see what else I can do but I don't really care about my Sony IEM as I am just using them to help me listen better as my HD 558 is fantastic and has none of these symptoms.

 

Like I posted (get an app with EQ, like Accudio), play around with the EQ bands at the 3.5 to 6khz range. You don't get it right off the guide and off the bat; use the guides to understand EQ better then "cut" at that frequency range.

 

Think of a frequency response as a flat line on a two-plane graph, then there's the range on the X-axis 3.5khz to 6khz. "Center Frequency" refers to the specific frequency you're applying the EQ effect to, while Width (in more technical processors, "Q") determines how wide the effects will be felt. Assuming the response is flat (for illustrative purposes only), if you choose 4khz as center frequency and boost that by 6db, the new curve will look more like the Transamerica Pyramid in San Francisco; medium/normal width will look more like the Giza Pyramids; wide will look like the Pyramid of the Sun in Teotihuacan (that assumes the heights are the same, but I'm using their shape and angle as example).

Now assuming there is a spike somewhere in the 3.5khz to 6khz range, but lacking the proper measuring equipment to know for sure, you try 4khz or 4.5khz first, at varying width settings (if using Neutron, this is extremely adjustable; try extremes first then work towards the middle, to determine where it's best). Now try other frequencies, making notes at each setting, until you narrow down to a few you like. Then use those for a few days, alternating everyday, until you settle on the one you really like.

 

Alternately, Accudio has some pre-loaded custom EQ profiles of the measurement of headphones/IEMs (I'm assuming it was through an iPhone), and then you choose if you want it to apply an EQ curve to get it closer to "Flat." It's not perfect but I like it for trimming some bass off the MEE M6 (I'm using one of the Sennheiser IEM profiles  on it).


Edited by ProtegeManiac - 9/1/13 at 12:37pm
post #7 of 9
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ProtegeManiac View Post

 

That's no guarantee. Some audiophile-labelled CDs have bad tracks. Use Google, I kinda remember consistently negative reviews about some Telarc discs that came out mid-2000s. Rebecca Pidgeon's Spanish Harlem on some compilation albums is also somewhat sibilant. Disable time alignment on my car and it's unlistenable, borderline painful; but of course on my home system (HD600) it sounds a bit natural, more like how she pronounces it than the recording or the system, but there's still a hint that the way it was recorded (maybe how close she is to the mic, etc) also contributes.

 

 

It's possible also that the HD558 could be softening and smoothing it over too much (does not necessarily mean the IEM isn't doing anything detrimental) but it makes for a stark contrast, whereas if there was some flaw in the recording but you're using a headphone/IEM closer to the midpoint between them, that flaw would be obvious but not necessarily grating.

 

 

I'm not sure what you mean, I never mentioned nor connected it to impedance, but to what happens to the soundwave after it leaves the transducer diaphragm - it bounces off a wall (or your dashboard and windshield), you hear the reflection microseconds after the direct soundwave, most audible effect time delay problem is the "ssssss" and "TTT." Or you hear the left tweeter followed by the left woofer then the right tweeter then the right woofer - delays are in microseconds so you don't hear four out of sync speakers overall, but can manifest in the sssssss and TTT.

 

It can happen that too low impedance can push an amp too far and produce distortion, but it can't be so specific as to make only for grating treble with no audible distortion elsewhere.

 

 

Like I posted (get an app with EQ, like Accudio), play around with the EQ bands at the 3.5 to 6khz range. You don't get it right off the guide and off the bat; use the guides to understand EQ better then "cut" at that frequency range.

 

Think of a frequency response as a flat line on a two-plane graph, then there's the range on the X-axis 3.5khz to 6khz. "Center Frequency" refers to the specific frequency you're applying the EQ effect to, while Width (in more technical processors, "Q") determines how wide the effects will be felt. Assuming the response is flat (for illustrative purposes only), if you choose 4khz as center frequency and boost that by 6db, the new curve will look more like the Transamerica Pyramid in San Francisco; medium/normal width will look more like the Giza Pyramids; wide will look like the Pyramid of the Sun in Teotihuacan (that assumes the heights are the same, but I'm using their shape and angle as example).

Now assuming there is a spike somewhere in the 3.5khz to 6khz range, but lacking the proper measuring equipment to know for sure, you try 4khz or 4.5khz first, at varying width settings (if using Neutron, this is extremely adjustable; try extremes first then work towards the middle, to determine where it's best). Now try other frequencies, making notes at each setting, until you narrow down to a few you like. Then use those for a few days, alternating everyday, until you settle on the one you really like.

 

Alternately, Accudio has some pre-loaded custom EQ profiles of the measurement of headphones/IEMs (I'm assuming it was through an iPhone), and then you choose if you want it to apply an EQ curve to get it closer to "Flat." It's not perfect but I like it for trimming some bass off the MEE M6 (I'm using one of the Sennheiser IEM profiles  on it).

#Post 1

 

sry I have no idea how to use this multi quote feature, but anyway like I said dun think it's my FLAC ( not saying it's certainly not my FLAC) that has bad production as I have listen this through my Shure 215 which does not excibit that problem 

 

#Post 2

 

Yes it could also be my the contrast between my HD 558 and the sony IEM as the sony one has a more bright and uncontrolled sound, whereas my HD558 has a way better sound stage and produces a solid overall sound signature.

 

#Post 3

 

Haha that was my bad I meant to write sibilant but my brain fail me

 

#Post 4

 

I'll try to download it but I am planning to get a proper DAP instead (maybe an X3 or Ak100) of my limiter storage iphone and a featureless FLAC player. However I listen to most of my Hi-Fi music on the PC and I have the Electro-Q equalizer program, which is still somewhat complicated for me to understand but I'll try to follow what u said, it'll be better if you can link me a video of it though. thanks anyway.

post #8 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by chee006 View Post

#Post 1

 

sry I have no idea how to use this multi quote feature, but anyway like I said dun think it's my FLAC ( not saying it's certainly not my FLAC) that has bad production as I have listen this through my Shure 215 which does not excibit that problem 

 

Just quote it several times over then delete sections as necessary, so you can have your reply directly under the part of the post you're replying to. I clicked on quote for this, highlighted it then pasted two times, then I deleted some sections so I can have it like how we do bullet points+comments on an office memo.

 

In any case, can you check specifically what Sony that is? It might have a thread here and other people might have experienced (and maybe have a solution) to that treble issue.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by chee006 View Post

 

#Post 2

 

Yes it could also be my the contrast between my HD 558 and the sony IEM as the sony one has a more bright and uncontrolled sound, whereas my HD558 has a way better sound stage and produces a solid overall sound signature.

 

Can you elaborate on uncontrolled? Based on the whole quoted statement, my guess though is that the HD558's "better soundstage" and "solid overall" means it has a larger (wider, maybe also deeper) soundstage, precise imaging, and each note attack is solid (particularly the bass), and by contrast the Sony is very "bright" - all notes more forward, like they're all jumping at you from in front but in such a manner that it really feels more like you're being attacked by sound sources and you end up confused as to where they're coming from.

 

If that's correct, then the problem may be more along the lines of:

1) The IEM's sound and tips/fit combined - the IEM could be in your ear too deep, or you just need the kind ear tips that control high frequencies, like Comply tips; unlike when using the same on, say, Sennheiser IEMs, I think it can stand to lose a bit more treble.

 

2) Your preferences/perception - you really just don't like the Sony IEM's sound presentation. Remember that even with proper design objectives and processes speakers and headphones can sound very different, particularly in the low to mid-fi* price points, because this is where engineers' preferences for the most honest response, they have to work with a lot of compromises, most importantly being able to produce and sell at the profit margin the company wants, so they compromise on certain aspects, thus what makes what in forums is referred to as "signature sound."

 

Also, aside from the more psychological (ie how you negatively perceive this sound vs others), you might actually be more sensitive to high frequencies - some people lose high frequency hearing (range and volume) more than others as they age. My grandfather's old Sansui speakers in his office were too bright for me from his desk but he has no problems with them.

 

 

 

*In the very low price points many of them across different brands could be using the same drivers, so they sound alike, usually in a bad way (not all of them of course).

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by chee006 View Post

#Post 4

 

I'll try to download it but I am planning to get a proper DAP instead (maybe an X3 or Ak100) of my limited storage iphone and a featureless FLAC player. However I listen to most of my Hi-Fi music on the PC and I have the Electro-Q equalizer program, which is still somewhat complicated for me to understand but I'll try to follow what u said, it'll be better if you can link me a video of it though. thanks anyway.

 

Just looked it up - this is NOT the kind of EQ you should be working with, no wonder you can't understand its interface even with the info I put in. It's basically a digital playback equivalent of guitar effects, like the stomp boxes I have by my foot - I can Metallica's "Unforgiven" on just my guitar and amp on basic settings, then when the solo is about to in, I hit the black-grey box for Distortion and my friend works the box with the long pedal (maybe also manipulate the flanger - that metal stick next to his strings) so he can dope the notes on the solo if he wants to, making the guitar sound more and more like it's crying. You can see the other stuff to the right on that page, they have all the other effects. I think this was primarily designed for recording, so you can dope the sound any way you want to without asking the primadonna band members for another take with different settings. It's basically the audio equivalent of a camera with in-camera special effects processing, like one with a "Miniature Mode" so it looks like you took a close-up photo of a diorama when all it did was take a wide angle shot, highlight contrast (and make it look sharp) at the focal point while blurring the rest of the frame (that's the filter in this EQ effects plug-in). Instead of these digital "stomp boxes," what you need is more like what you can find on a stack of Hi-Fi equipment from the 70's until the 80's, but in digital.

 

You need to get an app with a parametric (where you select the center freq) or graphic EQ (where they're all pre-set), but more importantly it should have other settings for this besides + or - in dB, most notably a Q-factor adjustment, which affects the width that will be affected. Go back to my post above, that's a very short guide and you can visualize that if you're looking at the right kind of EQ with the proper settings and interface.

 

 

-------------

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by chee006 View Post


I have tried googling but to no avail, I have read a page which tell me which one is high mid and low on the piano which does not help me at all even though I am a pianist because most of the songs I hear are way more complex with different instruments and vocals so it's next to impossible to tell which one is at what frequency, sadly I have no real life audiophiles to teach me either.

 

A recording is basically a completed mix, so yes all frequencies are there so unless you isolate each sound source (it's easier for a TV show crime lab to isolate ambient noise sources on a wiretap than to do this at home without the individual tracks used to make the Master), EQ effects are global. It's like having basic photo editing software, and you have a lens that for example causes the corners to have a purple cast on them. If your photo editing software can't isolate the corners, correcting the purple there means the rest of the frame will bias towards green the closer the corners are to the natural tone.

 

However, charts like this still have their uses regardless - it's just that when correcting playback using EQ you have to be aware that the effect is global:

 

Click here for the interactive version online.

post #9 of 9
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ProtegeManiac View Post

 

Just quote it several times over then delete sections as necessary, so you can have your reply directly under the part of the post you're replying to. I clicked on quote for this, highlighted it then pasted two times, then I deleted some sections so I can have it like how we do bullet points+comments on an office memo.

 

In any case, can you check specifically what Sony that is? It might have a thread here and other people might have experienced (and maybe have a solution) to that treble issue.

 

 

Can you elaborate on uncontrolled? Based on the whole quoted statement, my guess though is that the HD558's "better soundstage" and "solid overall" means it has a larger (wider, maybe also deeper) soundstage, precise imaging, and each note attack is solid (particularly the bass), and by contrast the Sony is very "bright" - all notes more forward, like they're all jumping at you from in front but in such a manner that it really feels more like you're being attacked by sound sources and you end up confused as to where they're coming from.

 

If that's correct, then the problem may be more along the lines of:

1) The IEM's sound and tips/fit combined - the IEM could be in your ear too deep, or you just need the kind ear tips that control high frequencies, like Comply tips; unlike when using the same on, say, Sennheiser IEMs, I think it can stand to lose a bit more treble.

 

2) Your preferences/perception - you really just don't like the Sony IEM's sound presentation. Remember that even with proper design objectives and processes speakers and headphones can sound very different, particularly in the low to mid-fi* price points, because this is where engineers' preferences for the most honest response, they have to work with a lot of compromises, most importantly being able to produce and sell at the profit margin the company wants, so they compromise on certain aspects, thus what makes what in forums is referred to as "signature sound."

 

Also, aside from the more psychological (ie how you negatively perceive this sound vs others), you might actually be more sensitive to high frequencies - some people lose high frequency hearing (range and volume) more than others as they age. My grandfather's old Sansui speakers in his office were too bright for me from his desk but he has no problems with them.

 

 

 

*In the very low price points many of them across different brands could be using the same drivers, so they sound alike, usually in a bad way (not all of them of course).

 

 

Just looked it up - this is NOT the kind of EQ you should be working with, no wonder you can't understand its interface even with the info I put in. It's basically a digital playback equivalent of guitar effects, like the stomp boxes I have by my foot - I can Metallica's "Unforgiven" on just my guitar and amp on basic settings, then when the solo is about to in, I hit the black-grey box for Distortion and my friend works the box with the long pedal (maybe also manipulate the flanger - that metal stick next to his strings) so he can dope the notes on the solo if he wants to, making the guitar sound more and more like it's crying. You can see the other stuff to the right on that page, they have all the other effects. I think this was primarily designed for recording, so you can dope the sound any way you want to without asking the primadonna band members for another take with different settings. It's basically the audio equivalent of a camera with in-camera special effects processing, like one with a "Miniature Mode" so it looks like you took a close-up photo of a diorama when all it did was take a wide angle shot, highlight contrast (and make it look sharp) at the focal point while blurring the rest of the frame (that's the filter in this EQ effects plug-in). Instead of these digital "stomp boxes," what you need is more like what you can find on a stack of Hi-Fi equipment from the 70's until the 80's, but in digital.

 

You need to get an app with a parametric (where you select the center freq) or graphic EQ (where they're all pre-set), but more importantly it should have other settings for this besides + or - in dB, most notably a Q-factor adjustment, which affects the width that will be affected. Go back to my post above, that's a very short guide and you can visualize that if you're looking at the right kind of EQ with the proper settings and interface.

 

 

-------------

 

 

A recording is basically a completed mix, so yes all frequencies are there so unless you isolate each sound source (it's easier for a TV show crime lab to isolate ambient noise sources on a wiretap than to do this at home without the individual tracks used to make the Master), EQ effects are global. It's like having basic photo editing software, and you have a lens that for example causes the corners to have a purple cast on them. If your photo editing software can't isolate the corners, correcting the purple there means the rest of the frame will bias towards green the closer the corners are to the natural tone.

 

However, charts like this still have their uses regardless - it's just that when correcting playback using EQ you have to be aware that the effect is global:

 

Click here for the interactive version online.

I'll try to see the box of that Sony IEM when I get back to my hometown the next time, yes you absolutely got it right about my meaning of uncontrolled. I dun think it's my IEM fit cause if i pull it out anymore it'll just fall off and there is no way of pushing in anymore. I have to agree that it may be that I dun like Sony signature, I have use the Sony MDR1 myself before and did not like it at all.  Feel it's more for watching movies than listening to Bohemian Rhapsody.

 

So exactly which EQ program do u wan me to download for my PC? 

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