Head-Fi.org › Forums › Help and Getting Started › Introductions, Help and Recommendations › Hello, newbie seeking answers!
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Hello, newbie seeking answers!

post #1 of 77
Thread Starter 

This is my first post!

 

I am not an audiophile, I have only got a pair of Shure 535 IEM that I use everyday with my iPod Touch. I bought it after reading reviews from here and elsewhere on the net. I hated it at first but I am now used to its sound signature and learn to live with it. This makes me wary of other's review as they tend to differ from my preferences.

 

I am currently looking for an open full-size headphone for home use. I wanted a good soundstage and a good amount of bass, so I narrowed it down to Beyerdynamic DT 990 premium. Initially I was going to buy JVC FX700 which I think has the same sound signature but I decided to go for a full size can because a good soundstage means an open design which will not isolate well, so there's no point using it outdoor. The DT990 requires amp (from what I read), I decided on Fiio E12 which seems powerful enough and is portable.

 

I read A LOT of reviews here before deciding on this combo, my other choices are: Beyerdynamic DT880/DT1350/T90 and Sennheiser Momentum/600/650.

 

I don't want to make the same mistake as the Shure, I really hope I made the right decision! The posts here are sometimes conflicting, some people commented on a particular headphone being sibilant while another said the treble is muffled. I am suspecting the hearing range of reviewers when they are comparing the headphones. This leads to some questions I wanted to ask this forum:

 

1. I have a graphic background, when doing professional graphic work we use high grade monitor screen that covers 90+% Adobe RGB colour space. (No computer screen today can cover the entire colour gamut possible in the world.) The monitor is also calibrated for accuracy. I was wondering if there is similar thing in the audio world? The audio equipment is calibrated so the music plays as it was intended? I have heard people often commented on a specific headphone being neutral and accurate, but if it is really neutral, shouldn't the frequency chart show a complete straight line? If some headphones are described as neutral sounding, shouldn't they all sound alike since they are neutral? So obviously they are colored? I believe the only way to get an accurate audio reproduction from headphone is some kind of calibrating program to compensate the deficiencies of the headphone. That means the manufacturer will have to supply a sound profile of the headphone (just like a computer screen with color profile) for the playing device to do the calibration. Since most people use iPod/iphone/tablet to play their music I think it is a feasible idea.

 

2. My hearing range is 26hz - 16.3khz. You can easily use an audio program to generate tones and test your own range. (Fact: People over the age of 24 can't hear above 17khz) The reason I mention this is because I suspected that reviewers have very different hearing range and the conflicting reviews are sometimes not due to subjective taste but their hearing ability. Would it be a good idea for reviewers to state their hearing range when they write reviews so we can better understand and weight their opinion?

 

Thanks for reading my blabbing. Have a good day!


Edited by pianissimos - 9/1/13 at 4:44am
post #2 of 77
Hello!

Welcome to Head-Fi! First thing first, what's with the SE535 that you do not like? Is it the hissing? As for the hearing loss, it's for sure not your problem if you tested it with your SE535! The SE535 have pretty roll off in the higher frequency.

If you are looking with more open sounding, I suggest you to look into PSB M4U1, AKG K550 and Sennheiser HD598. The Momentum have a rather closed sound smily_headphones1.gif

Hope it helps!
Billson smily_headphones1.gif
post #3 of 77
Thread Starter 

Hi and thanks for recommending PSB M4U1, I haven't heard of it until now. It looks very interesting, it's just a shame that this headphone is very ugly to me... It has TONS of good review everywhere.

 

What I hate about Shure 535 is the exaggerated mid. When I bought it, I was hyped up on it's warm musical sound, and then I tried it... I felt like I was listening to a gramophone. I can barely hear the bass and there's no treble. I thought if this is audiophile quality sound, then I will go back to my cheap commercial IEM. Now I use an equaliser on my iPod touch to reduce the mid, this way when I turned up the volume the bass and treble are more prominent. The good thing about 535 is the sensitivity and low impedance, you only have to turn the volume half way and it gets loud. It seems like 535 is built for EQ, because without equalizing it really sounds horrible.

 

Edit: I forgot to mentioned that Shure 535 has a frequency response of 18Hz - 19kHz, much more than I can hear!


Edited by pianissimos - 9/1/13 at 7:38am
post #4 of 77
Hi, pianissimos. I've had a similar journey. There was a time when I believed in a direct relationship between headphone price and sound quality. Scratch that - I mean between price and how much I would like it! I bought a set of Etymotic IEMs for $150. I wondered where all the bass was. Bass is good, right? People like bass! I've since learned that different headphones are made to suit different tastes, and there's no indication of this on the box. After that I got a pair of Klipsch S4s for $80 and absolutely loved them. I now own a pair of Shure SE215s and like them even more. Do I think I would be in heaven with the 535s? No way. If the manufacturer calls it "audiophile" or "reference" grade, I know that it's not my cup of tea. I look for a headphone that's like a good party guest - they bring the punch. That's a knee-slapper, right there. So, yeah, it's a matter of taste and you make a great point about how perception will differ across individuals. Discussing a subjective experience and expecting it to translate objectively seems like a ridiculous idea. It's fun, and it's better than nothing but, at the end of the day, you have to try it for yourself.

Maybe there's a business opportunity, there. With the big box stores going out of business, it's tough to go try out headphones. You could buy a bunch of headphones, put them in a crate, and ship them out to a customer who could then sample all of them for a price, basically rent them. This would save them a lot of time and money they would otherwise have to spend to achieve the same thing on their own. Does anyone already do this?
post #5 of 77
What you have discovered is how highly subjective headphone preference is, and how use testimonials are, at best, useful for ballparking the sound signature. I figure that after readings lots of testimonials and reviews, my conclusions are probably only about 80% accurate at best, and then even if what I feel a headphone will sound like is accurate, I still might be wrong about whether or not I will like it. Gotta listen to know for certain if a headphone or IEM is right for you smily_headphones1.gif
post #6 of 77

A bit off-topic but you've really scared me with that fact about people over 24. Am I going to lose my ability to hear higher frequencies? eek.gif

post #7 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by dqtl74 View Post

A bit off-topic but you've really scared me with that fact about people over 24. Am I going to lose my ability to hear higher frequencies? eek.gif

Eventually yes (a result of aging, coming gradually of course and not at the same pace for all). Nothing particular happens at 24. And there is very little above 15 khz at recordings to hear.

post #8 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by dqtl74 View Post

A bit off-topic but you've really scared me with that fact about people over 24. Am I going to lose my ability to hear higher frequencies? eek.gif

You will also eventually lose your ability to read without glasses. LOL
post #9 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by cel4145 View Post


You will also eventually lose your ability to read without glasses. LOL

Well since I already wear glasses anyway... biggrin.gif

 

So long as I can continue to enjoy music I'm good. dt880smile.png

post #10 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by dqtl74 View Post

Well since I already wear glasses anyway... biggrin.gif


So long as I can continue to enjoy music I'm good. dt880smile.png

Well, the very, very high frequencies sound more like mosquito buzz. So I wouldn't worry about missing out on so much when your hearing range drops to 15kHz. wink.gif
post #11 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by pianissimos View Post

This is my first post!

 

2. My hearing range is 26hz - 16.3khz. You can easily use an audio program to generate tones and test your own range. (Fact: People over the age of 24 can't hear above 17khz) The reason I mention this is because I suspected that reviewers have very different hearing range and the conflicting reviews are sometimes not due to subjective taste but their hearing ability. Would it be a good idea for reviewers to state their hearing range when they write reviews so we can better understand and weight their opinion?

 

Thanks for reading my blabbing. Have a good day!

Not really, and I'm sure I can hear some where up to there as well, and a notch lower [half blind] still most of what we want to hear is around 20-20k

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by dqtl74 View Post

Well since I already wear glasses anyway... biggrin.gif

 

So long as I can continue to enjoy music I'm good. dt880smile.png

Oh you wear glasses, then you might be legally blind like ME, which means my hearing is GOLDEN [cuz I can't see taste or smell worth a dmn q.q] 

 

That being said, 

 

I think the Dt 990 will work for me, it's one HECK of a bargin and yes it's calibrated to be very accurate [yet maintain a nice bass presance] honestly the E12 and Dt 990 combo will be very pleasureable, and if your used to focusing on mirco details using imaging software, you'll proably pick up on teh differeances between headphones pretty easy, in addition have fun and enjoy the hobby! 

 

Not to mention buying gear like tge Dt 990 and E12, both are items that will sell as fast as you bought them, so if you HATE it sell it and try another combo! 

post #12 of 77
It looks like the OP wanted something more neutral as he do not like losing anything or do not wish anything to be pushed forward. Maybe Grado, AKG K550?

Hope it helps!
Billson smily_headphones1.gif
post #13 of 77

I'm selling a K550 my self actually! 

post #14 of 77
Thread Starter 

I like the look of K550, people described it as a close can that sounds like an open one, is that true? What I worried about is the amount of bass, will the bass be better than the Shure 535?

 

I found a really good deal for Beyerdynamics T90, will it be suitable for me? There's not a lot of reviews for this one.

 

DT990 + E12 is still my preferred choice right now, I think I will buy them within 2 days if nothing better comes up.

 

Thanks for all the suggestions!

 

Edit: I just found out that DT990 was launched in 1988, this model was on the market for 25 years! 770/880/990 was BD's top range for 2 decades before they replaced it with the Tesla ones 2 years ago. That is incredibly slow, compared to today's yearly product launches.


Edited by pianissimos - 9/2/13 at 5:51am
post #15 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by pianissimos View Post

I like the look of K550, people described it as a close can that sounds like an open one, is that true? What I worried about is the amount of bass, will the bass be better than the Shure 535?

 

I found a really good deal for Beyerdynamics T90, will it be suitable for me? There's not a lot of reviews for this one.

 

DT990 + E12 is still my preferred choice right now, I think I will buy them within 2 days if nothing better comes up.

 

Thanks for all the suggestions!

I'd say avoid the T90 as your first headphone, and I've not heard the T90 but it's a touch above the Dt 880 and Dt 990 [in quality and price] , so for the price the Dt 990 Pro is a great choice as is the Dt 880 [the Pro Series Dt cans are the best for their price] both of those being half as much as the T90 

 

And yes the K550 does sound very open! {i'm selling one my self} and the isolation is wonderful, in addition I'm selling my old K550 and JDS Labs C5 combo, the c5 added a nice mid and bass presenace into the K550. For me the K550 had a great TIGHT bass, it was awesome for rock, folk, jazz and classical, but for EDM I still wanted a touch more bass, which is where the C5 comes into play, I choose the C5 because of it was able to retain mid and treble details even with the bass boost on, not to mention it has a touch more sound stage than the Fiio Amps

 

Still, the Dt 990 and E11 combo is an excellent one, that I used for a while my self! although rember there is no isolation with open cans [which might be a good or bad thing for you] 

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
Head-Fi.org › Forums › Help and Getting Started › Introductions, Help and Recommendations › Hello, newbie seeking answers!